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Full text of "Magazine of New England history"



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VOLUME I. 



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p^ges 79-82 are'i^Issing In vol. 3, 1892 



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VOLUME I. 



^EWPOf^T, ^. I. 

1891. 
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R.HAMMETT TILLEY, 

EDITOF^ AND PUBUSHEI^, 

NEWPORT, F^. I. 



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Contents. 



Adams Family, The, of Groton, Conn 239 

Announcements. — Burr Family, 192. Dutton Family, 
62. Higley Family, 63. History of Oxford, 
Mass., 192. Hoag, Hoeg, Hoegg Family, 221. 
Ladd Family, 63. Lamb Family, 64. Matters 
and Men in Newport, R. I., 1858-1891, 192. 
Moseley Family, 62. Parker Family, 63. Pullen 
Family, 63. Snow family, 192. Williams Fam- 
ily, 63. 

Baiigor, Maine, Early historj^ of . 1 

Book Notes. — About an old New England Church, 19. 
A Genealogy of one branch of the Warren Fam- 
ily, 256. An autobiographical sketch of Rev. 
Royal Crafts Spaulding, 256. An account of the 
Centennial Celebration of the Congregational 
"Church of Christ in Hinesburg, Vt., 256. An- 
nals of the Redwood Library, Newport, R. I., 255. 
Barrington on the Narragansett as a place of res- 
idence, 60. Eastern Worcester, its first settlers 
and their descendants, 255. Fra Lippo Lippi, 61. 
Fugitive Facts, 191. Genealogy of the Bigelow 
family of America, 256. Genealogical Records of 
the descendants of John and Anthony Emery of 
Newburg, Mass., 256. History and Genealogy of 
the Burgner family in America, 251. History of 
the Old South Church, Boston, 61. History of 
Salisbury, N. H., 252. Illustrated Popular Bi- 
ography of Connecticut, 256. New England Di- 



iv CONTENTS. 

rectory for 1891, 190. Notes and Additions to 
the Ilistory of Gloucester, Mass., 255. Salem 
Witchcraft in outline, 256. Soldiers in King 
Philip's War, 255. Some Phases in the Sexual 
Morality and Church Discipline in colonial New 
England, 255. The Goodwins of Hartford, 
Conn., 256. The grave of Myles Standish, 252. 
The Ladd Family, 255. The one hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the founding of St. James 
Parish, Birmingham, Conn., 255. The Sabbath in 
Puritan New England, 253. The Sayward Fam- 
ily, 256. The Wights, a record of Thomas Wight, 
of Dedham and Medfield, Mass., and his descend- 
ants, 61. Vital record of Rhode Island, 190, 254. 
. Worcester Town Records, 191. Year-book of 
the Society composed of descendants of men of 
the Revolution, 250. 

Boston, The Original Liberty Hall. 8 

Braintree, Mass., The Coddington School Lands 228 

Cartwright Family Genealogy, The Orient and Occi- 
dent, or the 208 

Centenarians in New Hampshire 241 

Coddington School Lands, Braintree, Mass 228 

Cook, Rev., Rozel, Record of Marriages of, 1784-1798, 

Montville, Conn 186-213 

Document with a history, A, 239 

English home of the Seventh-Day Baptist Clarke's of R.I. 202 
Extracts from the Letter Book of Samuel Hubbard, 

1641-1688. Continued , 172-193 

Graffort's Fort and Queen's Chapel,Portsmoutli, N. H... 16 

Grant, General, Ancestry of, 14 

Hillhouse, Rev., James, of New London, Conn., and 

his Family, , 92 

Historical Societies 121 

Hubbard,Samuel, Extracts from Letter Book of,1641-1688. 193 
Indian Names of Places on Long Island, N. Y., and their 

Correspondences in Virginia 154 



CONTENTS. V 

Long Island, N. Y., Some Indian Names of Places and 

their Correspondences in Virginia 154 

Masonian Proprietors' Records, New Hampshire 180 

Montville, Conn., Record of Marriages, by Rev. Rozel 

Cook, 1784 to 1798 186-212 

Montville, Conn., Record of the Second Chnrch of 

1722-1740 42 

New England Patents, Early, 183 

New Hampshire, Masonian Proprietors' Record. ....... 180 

New Hampshire, Centenarians in, 241 

Newport, R. I., Record of Marriages, by Rev. Gardner * 
Thurston, Pastor of the Second Baptist Chnrch of, 

1759-1800. Continued, 51, 124, 150, 243 

Notes. — A few Sunday Laws of the Plymouth Colony, 
149. A Curious Legacy, 161. A quaint epitaph 
in Attleboro, Mass., 185. A riot in East Green- 
wich, R. I., 1774, 217. An Historical Building 
Saved, 110. Beverley, Mass., Historical So- 
ciety, 110. Dover, N. H., 97. Dr. Asa Mes- 
ser, 22 L Early population of Plymouth Colony 
and Massachusetts, 50. Early laws in Massachu- 
setts relating to Eires, 160. Fortiiications on the 
Piscataqua river, 41. Founder of Harvard Col- 
lege, 109. Glass Making in Massachusetts, 179. 
In Memor}^ of Rev. Samuel Langdon, D. D., 1 12. 
In Memory of Rev. Dr. Mansfield, of Derby, 
Conn., 162. Mount Desert Island, Maine, 182. 
Portsmouth, N. H., Historical Society, 111. Silk 
Culture in Conn., 171. The first Marble Quarry 
in Vermont, 55. The Massachusetts Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution, 109. The 
Kenebec, Me., Natural History and Antiquarian 
Society, 109. The Grave of Rev. Warham Wil- 
liams, Waltham, Mass., 110. The Earle Family, 
111. The old town of Quincy, Mass., 123. The 
First English Settlement in New England, 149. 
The Name Massachusetts, 13, 159. The New 



VI CONTENTS. 



* 



England Courant, 160. The Piscataqua River, 
207. The Capture of Gen. Prescott, 216. The 
Williams Family, "Zl6. The United Train of 
Artillery, Providence, celebrates the adoption of 
the Federal Constitution by Six States in 1788, 
219. Rhode Island and the Constitution, 220. 
The Right of Francliise during the early history 
of Massachusetts, 227. Wages in 1638, 97. 
Window-weights cast into Bullets, 1776, 212. 
Woburn, Mass., 24. 

Patents, Early New England 183 

Paul, Sergeant John White, The part borne by, in the 

Capture of General Prescott, 1777 98 

Pearce, John, Mason, Portsmouth, R. I., Some descend- 
ants of 129 

Portsmouth, N. H., Graffort's Fort and Queen's Chapel. . 16 
Queries, Genealogical. — Crandall, 59, Choate, 114. 
Cook-Rushmore-Prior-Birdsall-Alling, 117. Ches- 
ter, 119. (^artwright, 224. Clarke, 225. Clapp, 
226. Eddy or Addy, 57. Ellery-Keith, 167. 
Elton, 226. Eaton, 115. Hopper, 165. Hutch- 
ens, 166. Johnson, 114. Jones, 115. Lamb, 
166. Lane, 113. Messer, 116. Myers, 116. 
Malbone, 167. McLafhn-Fellows- Wells, 165. 
Pullen, 58. Parker, 59. Reed, 120. Reynolds, 
163. Salsbury-Eddy, 114. Snow, 166. Sisson, 
225. Silsbee, 226. Taylor-Halcomb-Whitlock, 
225. Tompkins, 224. Weaver, 118. Weare- 
Lawton, 225. Waite, 167. Williams, 117. 
Wood-Kinsley, 116. 
Queries, Historical. — An invitation to settle in New 
England, 57. Colonel Elias Starr of (Connecticut, 
113. Diary of Parson Hasey, 222. Early Ger- 
man Emigration into New England, 222. Fort 
Independence, Boston Harbor, 56. Fire Engine 
in Boston, 1740, 163. Pastors, Teachers and El- 
ders in the New England Churches, 163. Prizes 



CONTENTS. Vii 

for Digging Graves, 168. Quinnatisset, Conn., 
57. Ringing the bells at three o'clock at St. Al- 
bans, Vt., 57. Some interesting English Queries, 
222. State Treasurer of New Hampshire, 1791, 
113. The Oldest Baptist Church, 113. The 
first Grammar School in Boston, 113. The first 
Church Services in New England, 222. 

Replies to Queries.— An invitation to settle in New 
England, 120. Chester, 167. EUery-Keith, 227. 
Pastors, Teachers and Elders in the New Eng- 
land Churches, 222. Quinnatisset, Conn., 120. 
The Malbone Family, 170. The Oldest Baptist 
Church, 167. 

Schoolhouse, The Old, 25 

The Original Liberty Hall, Boston, 8 

Thurston, Rev. Gardner, Pastor of the Second Baptist 
Church, Newport, R. I. Record of Marriages of, 

1759-1800. Continued, 51, 124,150,243 

Williams, Robert, of Roxbury, Mass., and his descend- 
ants, 64 

Williams, Roger, The parentage of 20 



]V[\gAZINE OfJ\(eW ^NGLANDjflSTORY 



Vol, 1. JANUARY, 1891. No. 1. 



Early History of Bangor, Maine. 



HE ancient proprietors of this city Avere the Penobscot 
i/]l"^ tribe of Indians. This was the most numerous and 
^J! ypowerful tribe in Maine. The Pentagoet, or Penob- 
^^ scot, river and country was their domain. The French, 
by main strength, took possession of the country soon after 
1 600, and named it Acadia. Later on, that part of North 
America east of Kennebec, or St. Georges, became known by 
that name. November 8, 1603, King Henry IV, of France, 
granted it to Pierre du Gast Sieur du Monts, who undertook 
to cohjnize it and subdue and christianize the ancient inhabi- 
tants. In 1604, he came over, accompanied by the famous 
explorer, Samuel ChampLain, and 'began a settlement at St. 
Croix near Cahxis. Champhiin made a voyage to the west- 
ward that j^ear, and came here in the month of September. 
He describes the river and country as beautiful; on one side 
of the river, here at Bangor, he found a forest of oaks, some 
of the lineal descendants of Avhich may be seen on the estate 
of Deacon William S. Dennett on Grove street ; on the other 
side. Brewer, he found numerous pines. The thousands of 
stumps, which, even now, may be seen, bear testimony to his 
description. The colony at St. Croix failed. Other settle- 
ments Avere attempted at Port Royal, now Annapolis, Nova 
Scotia, in 1606 and 1611, which were failures. In the expe- 
dition of 1611 were two Jesuit priests, Pierre Biard and En- 



2 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

crniond Masse, who remained. These priests that year 
voyaged to the westward, along the coast and came here to 
Kadesquit. In a letter from Port Royal, dated January 31, 
1612, Father Biard gives an account of his visit here. He 
says if this is not the ancient Norombega that he and others 
have been looking for, he cannot conceive where it is. He 
found here "the finest community of savages he had yet seen; 
there were eighty canoes and one shallop, eighteen cabins and 
as many as three hundred souls, the principal sagamore was 
Betsabes, a man discreet and very sedate ; and in truth, one 
recognizes in these savages, virtues, natural and political, 
which would make anyone blush, who is not shameless, when 
in comparison they consider a large part of the French who 
came into the region. 

In the meantime another expedition was got up in France 
by pious Catholics, and Madame de Guercheville, who had ac- 
quired the patent of Du Monts, determined to plant a colony 
in some other part of Acadia, where they could pursue these 
objects unmolested. By the advice of the Jesuit Fathers 
who came here, Kadesquit, now Bangor, was determined upon 
as the place where this settlement should be made. The ex- 
pedition sailed from France, March 12, 1613, and on its way 
here called at Port Royal, June 22, 1613, for those who were 
there. June 27th, they departed for Kadesquit, but were de- 
tained for several days, off Grand Manan, by a regular Pas- 
samaquoddy fog, and got sick and discouraged, and made the 
first land, which proved to be Mount Desert Island, probably 
at South West Harbor, and there the settlement was made. 
Father Biard says, the Providence of God prevented their 
going to 'Kadesquit as originally intended. And thus Ban- 
gor failed to become a French Catholic Colony and settle- 
ment. I may say here that long before the Pilgrims settled 
at Plymouth, the Catholic religion prevailed here, and prior 
to 1700, Catholic Chapels with bells thereon were heard at 
Old Town, Passadumkeag, Mattawamkeag, and we think 
Mount Hope. Controversies between France and England 
began to arise in the claim for territory. The French in a 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 3 

manner controlled the Indians ; and the white settlers to the 
westward were kept in a continued state of fear by their in- 
cursion. 

MAJOR BENJAMIN CHURCH 

Was sent to the eastward to fight the Penobscot Indians. 
In August and September, 1696, he came here and found no 
Indians. He then went to "The Bend," to Indian Old 
Town, and to Passadumkeag, where were Indian settlements. 
The Indians, nearly all of them fled, and he returned. 

CAPT. THOMAS WESTBROOK. 

The Indian and French troubles continued, and in March, 
1723, Massachusetts sent Capt. Thomas Westbrook eastward 
with troops to fight or drive off the Indians. He came here 
and found no Indians ; he then went to Old Town, Indian 
Island, but found no Indians there. He burned the fort, 
chapel, and priest's house, and twenty-tln-ee other houses, 
and then returned to the westAvard. 

GOVERNOR THOMAS POWNAL 

Came here in 1759, and built a fort at Fort Point. It was 
named Fort Pownal. He came to this place May 23, in liis 
sloop, and had trouble getting over Treat's Falls. He landed 
on the east side of the river, and with 136 men went above 
''The Bend." At tlie head of the Falls, there on the steep 
bank, he buried a leaden plate with the following inscription : 

"Province of Massachusetts Bay 

Dominions of Great Britain, Possession 

Confirmed by T. Pownal, Gov'r." 

He then erected a flag staff, hoisted the King's colors and 
saluted them. The next day he left and went down the river. 

From 1758 to 1769-70, this place was visited by fishermen 
and hunters only. In 1770, Jacob Bussell, who was the first 
settler, came here with his family, and his son Stephen and 
his wife, and Caleb Goodwin and his family. 

In 1771, Thomas Howard, Jacob Dennett, Simon Crosby, 
Thomas, John and Hugh Smart, Andrew Webster, Jr., Jo- 
seph Rose and David Rowell from Woolwich and Brunswick, 



4 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

With their faiiiilies, Solomon and Silas Hathorn from Worces- 
ter, Mass., and their families. In 1772, James Dunning with 
his family, came, and the same year Robert Treat from Bos- 
ton, by way of Fort Pownal. 

Other settlers followed. Deacom William Boyd from 
Bristol, 1791 ; Abraham Tourtelotte from Newport, R. I. ; 
Nath. Harlow and John Harlow, brothers, from Plymouth, 
Mass., about 1789-90; Robert Hichborn, Jr., 1794; Mark 
Trafton, William Hasey, Jonathan Lowder, Theodore Traf 
ton, William Forbes, 1799 ; Capt. James Budge, Nathaniel 
Mayhew. 

The early settlers were squatters. They supposed that the 
State owned their lands. Prior to 1800 the owners of the 
Waldo Patent made a claim on the State, by reason of the 
fact that re-surveys had taken away a part of the quantity 
which the Patent called for. To satisfy this claim the State 
gave the Waldo heirs the four townships, now Bangor, Her- 
mon, Hampden and Newbury, with a reservation of 100 acres 
to each actual settler. Prior to 1801 not a settler had a deed 
of his land. Possessory rights were invariably respected. 

March 5, 1801, the General Court passed a law giving to 
each actual settler prior to Jan. 1, 1784, one hundred acres of 
land for $8.70, and for each actual settler between that date 
and Feb. 23, 1793, one hundred acres for $100. Park Hol- 
land was appointed surveyor and ran out these lots in 1801, 
and by his survey the titles to the settlers' lots are now held. 
Outside of the settlers' lots the Waldo heirs were the owners, 
and conveyed their lands by other surveys. 

INCORPORATION.- 

The whole territory on the west side of the river, from 
Wheeler's mills in Hampden, up, was erected into a planta- 
tion in 1787, called Condeskeag Plantation. 

The town of Bangor was incorporated Feb. 25, 1791, and 
the first town meeting was held March 22, 1792. Andrew 
Webster, Jr., was elected Town Clerk. The records from 
that time to 1798-9 are lost. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 5 

I give some sketches of the professional and business men 
early in Bangor : 

MINISTERS. 

Several ministers came here early as missionaries. Rev. 
Seth Noble, a revolutionary soldier, was settled as a minister 
Sept. 10, 1786. Fie was a good preacher and was in- 
clined to be convivial in his habits ; but was liked and re- 
spected by the best people in this vicinity. He resigned 
Nov. 4th, 1797, and returned to Massachusetts. 

Rev. James Boyd, a minister of the "standing order,' 
came here in September, 1800, and staid until November, 
1801. He was reputed easy in his morals. 

Rev. Harvey Loomis was ordained minister of the First 
Parish church, Nov. 27, 1811. He was a sincere Christian and 
acceptable preacher. He died 1825, 

PHYSICIANS. 

Dr. John Herbert, from Deerfield, Mass., came here in 1774. 
He was a surgeon and chaplain in the British army. He left 
in 1779. His grandson, George Herbert, Jr., settled in Ells- 
Avorth as a lawyer in 1801. 

Dr. Phineas Nevers, a Revolutionary soldier, came here in 
1782, and died October, 1785. 

The next physician was Doctor Horatio G. Balch, who 
came about 1804. He is said to have cared more for politics 
tlian business. He was the second Representative from the 
town, 1807. He removed to Lubec before 1817. 

Dr. Hosea Rich came here in July, 1805. He continued in 
practice more than sixty years. He died January 30, 1866. 

LAWYERS. 

One Jethi'o Dalano, who was here in 1790, did much legal 
business and tried many cases before justices. I know but 
little of him except that he signed his name "Jethro Delano, 
Attorney." 

Oliver Leonard, from Norton, Mass., settled in Brewer, 
1796. Was Representative there several years. He moved 



r> MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

over to this city and died here. He was the first educated 
lawyer on Penobscot river. 

Allen Oilman came here in 1801 from Brewer village, 
where lie first located. He was the first mayor of Bangor, 
in 1834. After 1801, came William D. Williamson, after- 
ward o-overnor, Jacob McGaw, Samuel E. Button. 

MERCHANTS PRIOR TO 1800, 

Jedediah Preble came here in 1770-1 and settled above 
Trent's Falls. He was government Truck Master and mer- 
chant. He was said to be a Tory and very unpopular with 
the Indians. He built the first framed house in Bangor. He 
left about 1773. 

Major Robert Treat came from Boston in 1773 and settled 
first at the mouth of the Penjejawock stream, and afterward 
at Penobscot Falls, later known as Treat's Falls. He owned 
saw mills here and at Frankfort and Orland. He also built 
vessels, and, it is said, the first one on Penobscot river. Par- 
son Noble in his diary says : "Nov. 3, 1791, Mr. Treat's brig 
launched." Major Treat was an active, enterprising mer- 
chant and useful citizen. 

Joseph Junin, a Frenchman, came from Castine in 1790. 
He was an Indian trader. He was murdered in his store at 
City Point, February 18, 1791. 

Bulkley Emerson, from Kennebunk, came about 1795. He 
was the first postmaster of Bangor, 1801. 

William Hammond, Jr., from Newton, came about 1794-5. 
He built mills and did much to promote the interests of 
Bangor. 

Up to 1800 Bangor had not grown much. Brewer village 
was a formidable rival, and to some extent Hampden. Soon 
after 1800 it began to be seen that the natural situation of 
Bangor was better than any other town on the river, and a 
new emigration commenced, which brought here vigorous, 
enterprising, ambitious men, who gave it character and stand- 
ing. The most notable of these (not before mentioned) who 
came prior to 1819, were : Charles Plammond, Capt. William 



MAGAZIKE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 7 

Hammond, senior, Elisha Hammond, Jolin Pearson, Isaac 
Hatch, Silas Hatch, James Bartiett, John Barker, George 
Barker, Mark Trafton, Oliver Frost, Wiggins Hill, Luke 
Wilder, Samuel W. Hayes, Thomas Bartiett, John Ham, 
James Drummond, Moses Patten, Amos Patten, James B. 
Fisher, Philip Coombs, Robert Lapish, Edmund Dole, Abner 
Taylor, Thomas Bradbury, Newell Bean, William Dole, Ste- 
phen Kimball, Eliashel Adams, Deacon George W. Brown, 
Joseph Whipple, Samuel Sherburn, John Sargent, Col. Sam- 
uel Datton, Francis Carr, M. C, 1812; Joseph Carr, senior, 
James (]arr, M. C, 1812 ; James Thomas, first representa- 
tive from Bangor ; Michael Sargent, Caleb C. Billings, Tim- 
othy Crosby, William Lowder, Capt. Israel Snow, David W. 
Haynes, John Giddings, Stephen Giddings, and others. 

These men were the real founders of the town and the 
city. Except in one or two instances the first settlers moved 
away up the river. With this hurried sketch, I leave to 
others better qualified to write, tlie history of later Bangor. 

— J . B. Porter in Bangor Courier. 



Pamphlets and newspapers began, as early as 1765, to dis- 
cuss the question of slavery. And, as the country approached 
the crisis of the Revolution, masters, in many cases, volunta- 
rily emancipated their slaves ; and appeals began to be made 
to the courts, by those held in bondage, to be declared free. 
There were two such cases in Middlesex Co., Massachusetts, 
between 1768 and 1770, in which judgment was rendered in 
favor of the parties suing for freedom ; and another was de- 
cided in the same way in Essex Co., in 1773, which were re- 
ferred to rather as examples, than to indicate the number or 
localities of these actions. 



In the trade with Barbadoes, Surinam, and other Southern 
ports, no article of export was more profitable in early times, 
than horses. A Law was enacted, in Connecticut, in 1660, 
requiring that every horse sent out of the colony should be 
registered, with its marks, age and owner. 



8 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND FIISTORY. 



The Original Liberty Hall, Boston, Mass. 




HE "Book of Possessions" of Boston, 1635, tells us 
that the plot of ground on the east side of Washing- 
ton street, between Essex street and Beach street, was 
Y apportioned to Garrett Bourne for a house and garden. 

He took the oath and became a freeman, and built a house 
and occupied it in tiie following year, 1636. He set out a 
variety of shade trees about his house, many of which were 
elms. In 1646 be transplanted an elm a little distance 
northwest of his house. It was a chosen, selected tree, on 
account of its shape and vigor. Garrett Bourne "built and 
planted better than he knew." In about a century the house 
became noted as a tavern, and a little later on, as the meeting 
place of the sons of Liberty. In about the same time, that 
transplanted elm became famous as the Liberty Tree, as the 
sons of Liberty used to rally under its wide-spreading 
branches. It was under this tree that the first public act of 
resistance to British tyranny showed itself. At dawn, on the 
14th of August, 1765, an effig}^ of Andrew Oliver, the stamp 
officer, was discovered hanging to one of the larger branches. 
This caused great excitement. The sheriff was ordered by 
the colonial Governor Hutchinson to remove the effigy from 
the tree. Bat such was the intensity of public feeling, he 
declared he dared not do so. It was creating a local revolu- 
tion, and was removed by stratagem. The tree became fa- 
mous about 1760, and was named the Liberty Tree about this 
time. On Feb. 14, 1766, it was pruned by the order of the 
Sons of Liberty. 

Tlie ground about the tree had become sacred soil, and was 
designated as Liberty Hall, and really became the original 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 9 

stamping ground of the Revolution, in defiance of the "Stamp 
Act." In 1767 a flagstaff was erected, which went up 
through the branches, upon which was hoisted a flag as a 
signal for the assembling of the Sons of Liberty. In August, 
1775, the Tories, encouraged by their British allies, and led 
on by one Job Williams, armed with axes, made a furious at- 
tack upon the Liberty Tree, and it was ruthlessly cut down. 
This vandal act caused great excitement. At the close of 
the Revolution a liberty pole was erected on the stump of 
the old tree, which long served a-; a point of direetion. This 
pole having served during the second war with Great Britain, 
and having gone into decay, another one was erected about 
the time of the arrival of General La Fayette as the guest of 
the nation in 1824. 

In 1823-24 Mr. Ralph Haskins erected a four-story brick 
hotel precisely upon the same ground occupied by Garrett 
Bourne's house in 163G. He named it, in honor of the ex- 
pected guest. La Fayette Hotel. Major General La Fayette 
arrived at the residence of Governor Eustis in Roxbury, 
August 22, 1824, as the guest of M issachusetts, at about 
two o'clock on Tuesday morning. On the following fore- 
noon, seated in the private carriage of Governor Eustis, he 
was escorted to the Boston line on the Neck, and formally 
presented to His Honor Josiah Quincy and a few of the re- 
ception committee, who were there to escort him as the guest 
of the city. The city authorities had not been idle in the 
matter of the arrival of La Faj^ette. The City Council, 
under the active leadership of the mayor, (the elder) Josiah 
Quincy, made generous and appropriate arrangements, result- 
ing in a perfect ovation by the whole populace. 

Business was suspended, every possible preparation was 
made for liis reception that hospitality, gratitude and patri- 
otism could suggest. The citizens were respectfully invited 
by the committee of arrangements to co-operate with them. 
The grand result was that the whole city was in gay attire, 
the French and American flags were entwined in various 
places, every yard of ribbon and bunting in the city was used 



10 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

in decorating. That not proving sufficient, a very large 
amount of red and blue and bleached cotton was used. A 
very large procession was formed on Boston Neck, under the 
direction of Colonel Samuel D. Harris, who had more than 
fifty aids and assistant marshals to carry out his wishes. 
General La Fayette, seated in a barouche, accompanied by 
the mayor and drawn by four white horses, was now in po- 
sition. A signal gun was fired for the procession to be put in 
motion, agreeably to the order of arrangements. Instantly 
every public bell in Boston rang out peals of welcome. The 
Sea Fensibles, stationed on South Boston Heights, and the 
Columbian Artillery, stationed on Copp's Hill, fired salutes. 
The peals of welcome continued while the procession moved. 
A civic arch was erected across Washington street, where 
Dover street now exists, from the centre of which was sus- 
pended a scroll bearing the inscription, "Welcome, La Fay- 
ette." 

In front of the La Fayette Hotel on Washington street, 
now Brigham's Hotel, was erected a civic arch twenty-five 
feet high, designating where stood the Liberty Tree. The 
arch proper was decorated with French and American flags 
entwined. The pillars were elegantly decorated with flow- 
ers, elm garlands, evergreens, oak leaves, and red, white and 
blue bunting. 

From the centre was suspended a large scroll, bearing in 
large capitals in gold, "Washington and La Fayette. A Re- 
public Not Ungrateful." 

Upon tablets at either side, in golden letters, was the fol- 
lowing : 

( West side.) 

The fathers in glory shall sleep, 

That gathered with thee in the fight, 
But the sons will eternally keep 
The tablet of gratitude bright; 
We bow not the neck and we bend not the knee. 
But our hearts, La Fayette, we surrender to thee. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 11 

(^Uast side.) 

Of high renown, here grevr the tree 
Of elm, so dear to liberty; 
Your sires, beneath its sacred shade, 
To Freedom early homage paid. 

This day with filial awe surround 
Its root that sanctifies the ground, 
And by your fathers' spirits swear 
The rights they left you'll not impair. 

The densest crowd ever seen in Boston surrounded the 
arch. As the General approached, three times three rousing 
cheers were given. The ovation was such that the proces- 
sion came to a halt. La Fayette was much affected, well 
knowing that he was upon, the "stamping" ground of the 
Revolution, and in front of the stump of the Liberty Tree. 
A most pleasing incident occurred here during the stop of 
the General's carriage. A beautiful young girl, with a silk 
sash of red, white and blue draped across her shoulders, 
emerged from tlie door of the Lafayette Hotel, bearing a sil- 
ver salvor, on which were two goblets and a bottle of tlie red 
claret wine of France, of which she invited the general to 
partake. This he did with characteristic courtesy, and it is 
a notable fact that tlie first refreshment of which La Fayette 
partook in the new city of Boston was furnished him from 
the hotel bearing his name, now Brigham's Hotel. 

After this incident another and remarkable one took place : 
As La Fayette rode up Tremont street, receiving on all hands 
the homage and congratulations of the immense throngs that 
greeted him, he perceived, seated on a balcony of a house 
then called "Colonnade Row," Mme. Scott, the sometime wife 
of the sturdy old Governor John Hancock. She had been 
his hostess in the old Hancock mansion on Beacon street as 
far back as the year 1781, and now, after a lapse of forty- 
three years, was instantly recognized by the general. With 
the inborn courtesy of a Frenchman, La Fayette directed his 
conveyance to stop in front of the house, and rising, with his 
hand placed over his heart, made a graceful obeisance, which 
was gracefully returned. The lady in her maiden life was 



12 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

tliat Dorothy Qiiincy whose name and fame have been per- 
petuated by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes in his charming lit- 
tle poem, ''Dorothy Q." 

The procession had now come to Boylston street, and was 
ordered to halt. The pupils of the public schools, under the 
direction of their teachers, had been arranged in a double 
line on the Tremont-street mall, and were protected by peace 
officers. The children had been instructed during the past 
month to sing the national hymn of France, "The Marseil- 
laise." They were all provided with bouquets of bright 
flowers ; the girls were all dressed in white, wearing red 
sash ribbons and blue ribbons on their summer hats ; the 
boys were also attired in red, T^hite and blue, white pants, 
blue jackets, and a red ribbon on their hats. The moment 
La Fayette entered the mall, the children struck up, in good 
voice and time, that glorious anthem, "Marseillaise." The 
effect was electrical. 

The third incident of the day now took place, and, as was 
each of the others, entirely unexpected by the committee. 
A young girl threw her bouquet in front of La Fayette. 
Her patriotic act was instantly taken up and eYQvj child all 
along the line threw bouquets upon the mall, and La Fayette 
literally passed over a bed of natural flowers, strewn at his 
feet, and in his honor. It was the most affecting incident of 
the day. 

A battalion of light infantry was formed on Park-street 
mall, and passed in review by the general. As he entered 
the State House grounds a salute was fired by artillery posted 
on the high ground south of the Frog Pond. He paid a 
short visit of courtesy to the governor and council, after 
which he was escorted to his lodgings in the stately old-time 
residence of Thomas Amory, Esq., now standing at the cor- 
ner of Park and Beacon streets. Shortly after reaching his 
lodgings, he appeared on the balcony, having on either side 
of him, Governor Eustis and ex-Governor John Brooks, both 
of whom wore their old Continental uniforms. The Boston 
regiments of militia which had acted as escorts, passed in re- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. IS 

view, and the ceremonies Of the day were brought to a close. 
Mr. Frederick F. Hassam, the antiquarian, has lately pre- 
pared a pamphlet to be given away to public schools and li- 
braries, and the rest of the edition to such persons as may 
send him their addresses. The pamphlet contains the patri- 
otic story considerably more in detail than as given above. 
Mr. Hassam, who for many years was a well-known cutler on 
Washington street, is now a resident of Hyde Park. — Boston 
Tianscript. 



John Josselyn, an Englishman, came to this country in 
16j3, and afterwards wrote a book which was entitled "New 
England's Rarities Discovered : in Birds, Beasts, Fishes, 
Serpents, and Plants of that country. Together with The 
Physical and Chirurgical Kemedies wherewith the Natives 
constantly use to cure their Distempers, Wounds and Sores." 
It was pubUshed in London in the year 1672, and contains a 
large number of remedies to be found in i\\Q fauna and flora 
of the country. 



The name "Massachusetts*' first appeared in print in Capt. 
Smith's "Description of New England" in 1616. In his nar- 
rative he omits the final S when he means the place, but uses 
it when he refers to the inhabitants. The best authorities on 
the subject say that the name means "a hill in the form of an 
arrow's head." 



There has been some doubt as to whether John Dawson of 
Virginia and John Gardner of Rhode Island, ever attended 
any session of the Continental Congress. An investigation 
of the journal of Congress shows that Dawson attended on 
Monday, December 8, 1788, and Gardner on Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 15, 1788. 



The first mill for giinding corn, in New London, was 
erected in 1651. 



14 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Ancestry of General U. S. Grant 




ATTHEW GRANTi was born in England, October 
j[3|, 27th, 1601. He came in the ship Mary and John, 
with his family, in 1630, to Dorchester, Mass., and 
i'*^ thence, in 1635, among the first settlers to Wind- 
sor, Conn., where he spent the remainder of his life, dying 

December 16tli, 1681. His wife, Priscilla , was born 

in England, February 27th, 1601, and became the wife of 
Matthew Grant, November 16th, 1625. She died at Wind- 
sor, Conn., April 27th, 1644. 

Their son Samuel Grant,^ born at Dorchester, Mass., No- 
vember 12th, 1631, settled in Windsor, Conn., and married 
Mary Porter, who was born in England in 1638, and became 
the wife of Samuel Grant at Windsor, May 27th, 1658. 
Samuel Grant departed this life September 10th, 1718. 

Their son Samuel Grant,^ Jr., was born in Windsor, Conn., 
April 20, 1659, and married first, Anna Filley, Dec. 6th, 1683, 
who died at East Windsor, Conn., May 8th, 1710. His sec- 
ond wife. Miss Grace Miner, was the daughter of John and 
Elizabeth (Booth) Miner, and granddaughter of Thomas and 
Grace (Palmer) Miner, to whom he was married April 11th, 
1688. 

Their son Noah Grant^ was born at Windsor, Conn., De- 
cember 16th, 1693, and married Martha Huntington, daugh- 
ter of John and Abigail (Lathrop) Huntington, June 12th, 
1717. They became early planters of Tolland, Conn., where 
he died Oct. 16th, 1727. 

Their son Noah Grant^ Jr., was born at Tolland, Conn., 
July 12th, 1718. He enlisted in the early part of 1755, and 
in November of that year was engaged with Israel Putnam 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. IS 

in rebuilding and strengthening Fort Lyman, afterwards 
called Fort Edward. He was a Lieutenant in the scouting 
party with Rodgers and Putnam from the camp at Lake 
George, from October 29th to November 3d, 1755. He com- 
manded the garrison at Fort Edward from November 23d, 

1755, to March 26th, 1756, and was then discharged, and re- 
enlisted the same day, and was appointed Captain of tlie 7th 
Company in the then Second Connecticut Regiment. He 
was one of a scouting party of about sixty men, who went 
out from Fort William Henry about the eleventh of August, 

1756, under Lieut. Kennedy of the Regulars, who reduced 
the party to eight, sending the rest of them back to the Fort. 
Lieut. Kennedy returned September 20th, 1756, but Captain 
Grant has never been heard of since he parted with him 
"many days" before. Noah Grant, Jr., married Susanna 
Delano, at Tolland, Conn., Nov. 5th, 1746. 

Their son Noah Grant,^ Jr., was born at Tolland, June 20th, 
1748, and married the widow Anna (Buel) Richardson in 
1775, who died at Coventry, Conn., in 1789. For Ids second 
wife he married the widow Rachael Kelly, at Greensburgh, 
West Moreland County, Penn., to which place he had moved 
March 4th, 1792. 

Their son Jesse Root Grant,^ was born tliere in January, 
1794, and married Hannah Simpson, June 24th, 1821. 

And their son Gen. U. S. Grant^ was born at Point Pleas- 
ant, Ohio, April 27th, 1822, and was married to Miss Julia 
B. Dent, at St. Louis, August 22d, 1848, and died at Mount 
McGregor, New York, July 23d, 18^5.— Richard A, Wheeler 
in Narragansett Weekly. 



As early as 1715 the people of Nantucket were pursuing 
the whales upon the ocean in small sloops and schooners, 
making voyages of a few weeks' duration and bringing the 
blubber home and trying out the oil on shore. 



The first church in Cambridge, Mass., and Harvard Col- 
lege, both date from 1636. 



16 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Graffort's Fort and Queen's Chapel, 

PORTSMOUTH, N. H. 



tHE following is an exact copy of a document in the 
county registry at Exeter, N. H., showing the true site 
/ of Graffort's Fort, at Portsmouth, N. H.: 

To all people to whom these psents shal come John 
Penhallow of Portsmo In N-Hampse In N-Engld Esqr Send- 
eth Greeting know ye yt ye sd Jno Penhallow as Executr to 
ye Last Will & testament of his Honed father Samll Pen- 
hallow Esqr Deed for ye paymt of ye debts and Legacies of 
ye Deed & in Consideration of ye sum of Seventy Pounds 
Curtt money of N-Engld to him In hand before ye Ensealing 
& Delivery hereof wel and truly pd Thirty pounds tliereof 
by Henry Hope of Boston In N-Engld merchtt as a Gift and 
Benefaction towards ye Purchase of a lott of land as hereaf- 
ter Boundd for ye Building of a Church or Chaple thereon 
ye other part being forty Pounds pd by ye Honble Henry 
Sherbun Esqr Bening Wentworth Theodore Atkinson Joseph 
Peirce & Isaac Sumners all of Portsmo afbresd as a Comitte 
Chosen by ye Society or Benefactors and Subscribers for ye 
Building sd Church or Chaple Rectt of wch sd Sums ye sd 
Jno Penhallow doth hereby Acknowledge & himselfe thereof 
& therewith fully Satisfied & Contentd hath Given Grantd 
Bargaind Sold Aliend Enfeoffd Conveyd & Confii-md & by 
these psents doth fully freely & Absolutely Give Grant Bar- 
gain Sell Alien Enfeoff Convey and Confirm unto ye Comitte 
aforesd & their Successors forever all yt lot or peice of land 
Scituate Lying & being In Portsmo aforesd at a place Calld 
& known by ye name of Graffords Hill where ye ffort calld 
Graff ords ffort formerly stood being Buttd & Boundd as fol- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 17 

loweth Beginning at ye Corner where Bow Street & Toomb 
street meets fronting on ye East Side of Toomb street one 
hundred foot and then Easterly by a lot of land of Margaret 
ffoys, formerly Margt Vaughan Eighty foot then northerly by 
a tryangular peice of land of ye sd Margt ffoys ninety two 
foot to Bow street & so as yt ye sd Church lot may be ninety 
five foot front or Rear on ye sd Bow Street To haue & to 
HOLD ye aforesd Lot or peice of land Boundd as aforesd unto 
ye Comitte aforesd & their Successors & after unto ye War- 
dens of ye sd Church or Chaple & their successors forever 
to and for ye use and uses Benefit and Behoof of ye sd 
Church or Chaple their building and to be Built from hence- 
forth and forever & to & for no other use & uses Intents or 
purposes wtsoever ; & ye sd Jno Penhallow for himselfe his 
heirs Execs & Admrs doth hereby Covenant promise & grant 
and agree to & with ye aforesd Comitte & their successors 
(& ye) Wardens yt may succeed & their successors In maner 
& forme following yt is to say yt at ye time of ye Ensealing 
hereof by virtue of his sd father's Will & for ye paymt of 
his Debts & Legacies as aforesd he hath In himselfe full 
Power good Right &; Lawfull Authority to sell & Dispose of 
ye pmises in manner and forme aforesd & farther yt ye sd 
Jno Penhallow doth hereby Covent Promise Bind & Oblige 
himselfe his heirs Exers & Admrs from henceforth & forever 
hereafter to Warrant & Defend allye above Granted & Bar- 
gaind pmises & ye Appurtens thereof unto ye sd Comitte 
& their successors ye Wardens and their Successors against 
ye Lawfull Claims and Demands of all & Every pson & 
psons whomsoever. In witness wrof ye said Jno Penhallow 
hath hereunto sett his hand and Seal this 29th day of June 
Ano Dom : one thousd seven hundred and thirty two 1732. 

John Penhallow [SealJ 

Signd seald & dd in Presence of 

John Eyre 

Mark : H : Wentworth 



18 MAGAZINE OF KEW ENGLAM) HISTORY. 

Prove of N-Hampslie Portsmo Augt: 11th 1782 then 
John Penhallow Esqr Acknowledgd ye foregoing In- 
strument as his Act & Deed. 

Cor : Josh : Peircb 

Just Pacs 
Recordd According to ye Origll Augt ye 12th 1732. 

The foregoing document proves conclusively that Graf- 
fort's Fort, supposed by some to have stood on Market Square 
near the North church, really stood on the spot now occupied 
by St. John's Episcopal church. The church or "chappie," 
mentioned in this document, was, of course, Queen's Chapel, 
erected in 1732 and destroyed by fire Dec. 24, 1806. 

Graffort's Hill and Fort derived their name from Thomas 
Graffort, for a time member of the Provincial Council of New 
Hampshire. He w^as the second husband of Bridget, daugh- 
ter of Richard Cutt, and niece of President John Cutt. 

Bridget Cutt's first husband was Thomas Daniel, from 
whom Daniel street derived its present name. This street 
was previousl}^ called Graff ort's Lane. Capt. Thomas Dan- 
iel was in the Pascataqua region as early as 1652. He was 
appointed one of the magistrates for Dover and Portsmouth, 
August 9, 1676, and ordered with Mr. Marten of Portsmouth 
to impress such vessels as were needful to go to Black Point 
and Winter Harbor against the enemy. (N. H. Provincial 
Papers, I. : 346.) He was appointed member of the Council 
in 16b0, and again in 1682. His death occurred Nov. 13, 
16S2, in a time of general sickness and mortality. The loss 
of a man of so much importance was so greatly deplored 
that the Rev. Mr. Moody preached his funeral sermon from 
II. Samuel, 2:80 — ''There lacked of David's servants nine- 
teen men and Asahel.''^ — [Ibid, 1:374.) 

Bridget Daniel is spoken of as the executrix of Thomas 
Daniel's estate. May 12th, 1684. She married Thomas Graf- 
fort, Dec. 11, of the same year, but August 6, 1697, became 
once more a widow. 

It was the year of Thomas Graffort's death that his fort 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 19 

was made a prison. The sheriff having complained that the 
want of a prison in the province rendered him incapable of 
performing his office, it was ordered by the general assembly 
June 9, 1697, "that he forthwith take npye Fort on Mr. Tho. 
Grafford's hill at Portsmouth for that use, and see it fitted 
accordingly, ye charge thereof to be paid out of the treasury, 
and the owner to be allowed reasonable rent for the same." 
Forty shillings per annum were allowed. — {Ihid^ 8:49.) 

The General Assembly voted Nov. 9, 1699, "that a strong 
logg house be built in the Province for a Prison, of thirty 
foot long, fourteen wide, one story of seven foot high, two 
brick chimneys in the mids^ five foot each, to be done 
forthwith, strong and substantial, the Treasurer, the Over- 
seer, and the charge to be paid out of the next Province as- 
sessment : to be sett in Portsmouth in or near the Great 
Yovtr—lbid, 3:88.) 

Sheriff Gambling complaining twenty-five years later that 
the jail was not sufficient, it was voted by the General As- 
sembly May 30, 1724, "that the old prison in Portsmouth be 
sold for the benefit of the Province to the best advantage." — 
(^Ibld, 4:137.) This was accordingly done by John Gihnan 
and Theodore Atkinson, the committee appointed for that 
purpose. — Mary P. Thompson in P oi tsmouth^ N. H.^ Journal. 



The first meeting house in the North Parish of New Lon- 
London, Conn., was erected in 1722, on land given to the 
parish by John Merritt and Mrs. Mercy Raymond. It was 
35x45 feet, twenty feet lugh, and cost one hundred and forty 
pounds. When first erected, the only finish was an outside 
covering and floors- Tlie pews were built by individuals, 
and held as their property, transferable by a written agree- 
ment. This house remained in use until 1772, when it was 
abandoned, and a new house built on a new site. 



The office of sergeant-at-arms of the Legislature of Mass., 
was established by law in 1835. Previous to that time, Jacob 
Kuhn was messenger to the General Court from 1786. 



20 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 




The Parentage of Roger Williams. 

^ ITTLE is known of the origin and early life of the 
founder of the State of Rhode Island. He was, ac- 
^^^ cording to a current tradition, born in Wales. We 
f have, however, no record or verified statement to this 
effect. This tradition or conjecture was endorsed, if it was 
not first put forth, by Rev. Morgan Edwards, a Baptist 
preacher, who was born in Wales in 1722 ; emigrated to this 
country in 17dl, and died in 1795. The tradition was the 
more readily accepted, from the fact that Williams was a 
common family name in Wales, and several Welshmen, 
named Roger Williams, acted prominent parts in connection 
with the stirring scenes and events of the 16th centurj^, nota- 
bly Sir Roger Williams, whose military career is s@t forth in 
Motley's "United Netherlands." About twenty years ago 
this distinguished historian stated to the writer that he had 
failed to trace any relation between the family of this dough- 
ty Welshman and that of Roger Williams of Providence, and 
had no reason to believe that any such relation existed. 

For a long period the tradition of the Welsh origin of 
Roger Williams remained without an}'" manifest effort to re- 
fute it or to verify it by means of authentic records. The 
tradition came thus to be well established and to be repeated 
as a verified statement. The fact is readily recalled that, 
when the Roger Williams Monument Association was formed 
in Providence, in 1860, several Welshmen residing in other 
sections of the country actively participated in the move- 
ment, with the expressed object of seeing a fellow country- 
man duly honored. Since that time Welshmen and men of 
Welsh extraction, impelled by a like generous motive, have 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 21 

erected and dedicated in the city of Brooklyn, N. Y., a mon- 
ument in honor of Roger Williams, the founder of the State 
of Rhode Island, whom they understood to be their fellow- 
countryman.* In the library of the Rhode Island Historical 
Society is a picture 22x28 inches, containing 76 portraits, 
each duly labeled, and all the persons represented presumed 
(from the context) to be Welshmen. The picture was litho- 
graphed in Philadelphia in 1883 (not far from the time when 
the plan for the monument referred to above was drawn). 
The picture was presented to the Societ}^ in 1885, by Mr. 
Daniel L. Jones of Brooklyn, N. Y. The central portrait, 
resembling one of Franklin, is labeled Roger Williams (the 
name being the hitter's fac-simlie autograph). The whole 
picture represents, as explained by its donor, the champion 
of religious liberty greeted by a goodly concourse of generous 
fellow-countrymen. 

But this demonstration of patriotic sentiment has not pre- 
vented some research and investigation, with a view to ob- 
taininor a better knowledge of the man whose title to honor 
does not depend upon birthplace or family. A discrimina- 
ting and well-to-do Welshman, who has lately paid the debt 
of nature, spent a large amount of time and money in trying 
to find in his ancestral land, genealogical records that would 
justify his claiming Roger Williams as a fellow-countryman. 
Reuben A. Guild, LL. D., the respected and efficient libra- 
rian of Brown University, did well when he sought to re- 
move a cause of confusion and error by showing that two 

*This monument was erected by Daniel L. Jones, who was an original member of the 

Roger Williams Monument Association. The Brooklyn monument bears the following 

inscription : * 

Erected 

BY 

Daniel L. Jones 
F. R. 

COFFADWRIAETH 
A. M. 

Roger Williams 
Founder of Rhode Island 
Born in Wales 

1599 
Died in Rhode Island 
1683, 



22 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

college graduates, named Roger Williams, arrived in the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony within a few months of each 
other, and that the record of the one who arrived first had 
been taken for the record of the Roger Williams of Provi- 
dence, who arrived later. The paper referred to above is en- 
titled, "Roger Williams, Freeman of Massachusetts," and 
may be found in the proceedings of the American Antiqua- 
rian Society, Oct. 21, 1887. Having settled this point to his 
satisfaction, Mr. Guild pushed his inquiries into fields where 
he had, in the opinion of the writer, no firm footing. Laying 
aside the tradition or conjecture that Roger Williams was 
born in Wales, he set forth in a carefully prepared paper, con- 
siderations that led him to believe that the champion of relig- 
ious liberty was born in Cornwall, and was the son of William 
Williams of Rosaworthy, in the southern part of Cornwall. 

While further developments in this direction were awaited, 
Henry F. Waters, A. M., the distinguished genealogist of 
Salem, whose researches brought to light the family and 
early life of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College, 
and also the lineage of Washington, the Father of our Coun- 
try, discovered in the city of London unlooked-for letters and 
records that point to that city as the early home, if not the 
birthplace, and to James Williams of that city as the father 
of the great champion of religious liberty. These newly 
discovered pampers have been printed in the New England 
Historical and Genealogical Register. They are a kind of 
historic-genealogical material that requires no argument to 
be understood and appreciated. They speak for themselves, 
better than any words of ours. 

The fact that Roger Williams uniformly spoke of himself 
as an Englishman, has never been denied or satisfactorily 
explained by those who claim that he was either a Welsh- 
man or a Cornishman. He showed none of the provincial- 
isms, idioms, or peculiarities that are ordinarily noticeable in 
persons of Welsh or Cornish origin. If he had come from 
such an out-of-the-way region as Cornwall, which is the ex- 
treme southern point (Land's End) of England, we should 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. ^ 23 

expect to find some reference to the fact in his writings, es- 
pecially in connection with visits to his native land. On the 
contrary, he simply spoke of himself as an Englishman — as 
an Englishman "to the manor born"— and his uniform con- 
duct and utterances to this effect are in strict accord with 
his character as a man above all pretence, concealment or 
prevarication. 

A genealogist of unquestioned ability and good judgment, 
after reading Mr. Water's papers to which we refer, has 
given the following nine reasons for believing that Roger 
Williams of Providence was a son of James Williams of 
London : 

1st. — Mr. Roger Williams took short- hand notes in Lon- 
don when a youth — Roger, son of James, resided in London 
when a youth. 

2d. — Mr. Roger was beyond the seas in 1634 ; so was Roger, 
son of James. 

8d. — Mr. Roger had a wife in 1634; so had Roger, son of 
James. 

4th. — Mr. Roger had a daughter in 1634; so had Roger, 
son of James. 

5th. — Mr. Roger had a brother who was a Turkey mer- 
chant ; so had Roger, son of James. 

6th. — Mr. Roger had a mother living about 1629 ; so had 
Roger, son of James. 

7th. — Mr. Roger expected, on the death of his mother, to 
receive from 20 marks to 20 pounds per annum. Roger, son 
of James, received from his mother 10 pounds per annum. 

8th. — Mr. Roger had an own brother Robert ; so had Roger, 
son of James. 

9th. — Mr. Roger is said to have been related to the Angell 
family. Roger, son of James, had relatives of that name. 

There is no evidence that these facts are true of Roger of 
Cornwall or of Roger of Wales. 

In conclusion, the writer is of the opinion that while a dis- 
pute may still exist as to which of seven different cities is 



24 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

entitled to the honor of having been the birthplace of Homer, 
there is no occasion for further controversy as to which of 
the three sections of Great Britain named above, was the 
early home of Roger Williams. Wales and Cornwall must, 
I think, yield the palm of honor to London. A combination 
of facts and circumstances seems to prove beyond reasonable 
question, that James Williams of London was the father of 
Roger Williams, the founder of the State of Rhode Island. 
This question could be settled only by authentic records such 
as Mr. Waters has produced. — Amos Perry in Providence 
Journal. 



WoBURN, Mass. — Originally Woburn was called Charles- 
town Village, and the first house was built in 1641, just a lit- 
tle west of what is now Winchester, on the bank of the Aber- 
jona River, and occupied by Edward Converse and his suc- 
cessors for many years. Edward Johnson, one of the first 
grantees, who was a prominent citizen of the Colony, and 
one of the commissioners who discovered Winnepesaukee, 
the source of the Merrimack, tells in his rare and valuable 
book, called "Wonder Working Providence of Zion's Saviour 
in New England," of the organization of the present First 
Congregational church in 1642, the ordination of Mr. Thomas 
Carter as pastor, and the incorporation of the town the same 
year. The act of the General Court constituting the place a 
town is brief enough for a model ; it is as follows : — "Charles- 
town Village is called Wooburne." It is supposed that the 
name was derived from the abbey and park of Woburn, in 
Bedfordshire. It originally included what are now the towns 
of Winchester, formerly called South Woburn, Burlington, 
originally called Shawshine, and Wilmington, originally 
known as Goshen Village. 

Woburn has always been patriotic, and in "the old French 
War" sent 150 of her 1500 population as soldiers. In the 
Revolutionary struggle she was among the foremost. Two 
days before the battle of Lexington, a company of fifty "min- 
ute men" was formed, and at the alarm on the morning of 
April 19, 1775, nearly all of them hastened to Lexington. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 25 



The Old Schoolhouse. 



It stands by the wayside beneath an old tree, 

Where I frolicked in childhood, light-hearted and free; 

'Tis rude and time-worn, and the weather-stained door 

Is carved with deep crosses, and marked o'er and o'er 

With drawings and names by childish hands traced, — 

Here, a part of a man, with the head quite effaced, 

But with shape and proportion ne'er intended by nature. 

The body a child's, but a giant in stature. 

The half-open door to my view has disclosed 

The benches and desks still standing in rows, 

All duly notched, where some idle boy sat, 

And worn smooth where his elbows rubbed this way and that- 

The desk of the master, his inkstand and rule, 

Where he set all the copies while he eyed the whole school. 

On the desk close beside, where the ferule is laid, 

Confiscated apples and tops are displayed ; 

Unchanged do they seem, and still standing there, 

Are the pail and tin cup, and the master's arm chair ; 

And still in the centre, all eaten with rust, 

The old stove and it's pipe, thickly covered with dust, 

On the three legs is resting, the fourth, broke and gone. 

Is supplied by a brick for its weight to rest on ; 

The papers and ashes lie scattered about. 

The bits of old pens with the feathers notched out, 

The marks on the wall, the ink on the floor, — 

E'en the smoke on the ceiling's the same as of yore. 

Hark ! the voice of the child, thro' the half-open door, 

Who cons, in faint treble, his dull lesson o'er. 

And the other, who yawns with his arms o'er his head, 

And sighs as he wishes his lesson was said ; 

Still deeper and longer, and more weary his sighs, 

When he turns to the window his sleepy grey eyes, 



26 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

And sees in the field the lambs skipping at play, 
And envies their freedom this sweet summer day, 
And believes in his heart that happy he'd be, 
If he like the lambs, could only be free 
To gambol and frolic, to stand or to run, 
To lie down on the bank and bask in the sun ; 
But oh ! this high bench, where his little short legs 
Hang dangling, benumbed and lifeless as pegs, 
While vainly he tries to reach with his toes 
The too distant floor— Oh ; these are the woes 
Which many a child in his school-hour knows. 
But hark ! the stern voice of the master is heard 
To call for his task, of which he knows not a word, 
And his visions and dreams are dispelled all at once, — 
The high seat is exchanged for the block of the dunce. 
How his little heart swells, when he hears that to-day 
P'or blockheads and dunces there must be no play ; 
And when on the green a gay group is thronging 
To join in their sports, how that young heart is longing ! 
Half-blinded by tears, he bends o'er his book. 
Not daring t' encounter the master's stern look ; 
Tho' his eye 's on the page, his thoughts are away 
Where the boys on the green now frolic at play ; 
As sideways he peeps from his slyly-raised eye. 
His hand seeks his pocket, — the marbles roll o'er. 
And render his sorrows far worse than before ; 
His knife and his jews-harp, and countless tow strings. 
All a boy's precious store of juvenile things, 
But add to his troubles, while striving to hide 
The tears which will flow in spite of his pride. 
'' The dull, lazy drone of an idle great fly 
Now strikes on his ear so desolately, 
'Tis in vain he endeavours his lesson to learn, 
Some object distracts him, where'er he may turn. 
Tho' the master has ruled every writing-book through, 
Every page of them given a thorough review. 
Every copy has set, and piled them away. 
Still his task is unlearned, — not a word can he say. 
As his hat on his head the master then placed. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 27 

The poor little idler he solemnly faced — 

"And now, sir, your task !" — Oh, terrible sound ! 

How wildly the tone makes his young heart to bound ! 

And now bursts the grief he so long had suppressed. 

In a torrent of tears which his pride had repressed — 

'Twas bad enough quite, to be kept from his play, 

And shut up alone in the school-house to stay. 

But a dunce to be called, and a blockhead beside ! — 

He, his mother's own darling, his father's own pride ! 

The cup of his sorrows was quite full before — 

The view of the master has made it run o'er. 

These griefs are not light, tho' they 're fleeting, 'tis true. 

And I longed to rush in and entreat his rescue. 

But sadden'd I turned me, and sauntered along, 

Still hearing the shouts of the light-hearted throng. 

And I sighed as I thought of the poor little one 

Who sat on the dunce-block forsaken and lone. 

And I fervently prayed that the future might bring 

No sorrow more grievous his young heart to wring. 

[The above is sent to us from Burlington, Vt. It was 
first published in the Democratic Review in 1846. We re- 
publish it because it gives a faithful picture of the old coun- 
try schoolhouse, 'such as many of our readers attended in 
their New England homes. — Ed. ] 



The Puritans placed great value on the services of the citi- 
zen soldiers, and for every method for strengthening that arm 
of defence, and for their correct discipline, they were prompt 
to adopt stringent laws ; the law of 1631 was as follows ; 
*'It is ordered that every man who finds a musket, shall al- 
ways have ready one pound of powder, twenty bullets, and 
two fatlioms match, under penalty of 10s., and that every 
captain shall train his company every Saturday." 



The winter of 1637-1638, was an extremely severe and 
distressing season to the inhabitants of Boston. Snow to the 
depth of nearly five feet,^remained on the ground from Nov. 
4 till the following April. 



28 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



A Sketch of the First Church in Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, and its Ministers. 




HE foundation of the First Church in Salem is iden- 
tical with that of the town itself. The Massachusetts 
Company, — having sent over Captain John Endicott 
^ and others, in 1628, to carry on the plantation at 
Naumkeag — at a meeting of the company in London, April 
8th, 1629, appointed Mr. Endicott to be the governor, and 
Francis Higginson, Samuel Skelton, and Francis Bright, 
whom they had engaged as ministers, to be members of his 
Council. These, together with Ralph Smith, another minis- 
ter, and a large number of people, arrived at Naumkeag on 
the 29th of June, 1629. Mr. Smith soon went to Plymouth, 
and Mr. Bright, pursuant to the company's instructions, re- 
moved to Charlestown. Naumkeaof then received the name 
of Salem, a Hebrew word meaning peace, Mr. Higginson 
and others being "earnest to have it designated by a term sig- 
nificant of their enjoying freedom from civil and ecclesiasti- 
cal oppression." On the 20th of. July, members of the 
church voted to choose Mr. Skelton to be pastor, and Mr. 
Higginson to be teacher. It was an agreed principle with 
the founders of this church, "that the authority of ordination 
should not exist in the clergy, but should depend entirely 
upon the free election of the members of the church." In- 
stead of being titled Reverend, then and a considerable pe- 
riod afterwards, Congregational ministers were called 
Elders." 

We append a notice of the ministers of the church. 

1. Rev. Francis Higginson was the first pastor from 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 29 

1629 to 1630, when lie died. He was minister of one of the 
parish churches in Leicester, but, becoming a non-conform- 
ist, by his conscientious study of the scriptures, he was 
ejected from his living, and forbidden to preach in England. 
''He lived," says Dr. Bentley, "to secure the foundation of his 
church, to deserve the esteem of the colony, and to provide 
himself a name among the worthies of New England." He 
left a widow, Ann, and eight children. 

2. Rev. Samuel Skelton (1629 to 1634) was educated 
at Clare Hall, Cambridge, England, Jle survived Mr. Hig- 
ginson about four years, during which he was sole pastor, ex- 
cepting the two brief periods that Roger Williams was his 
assistant. He died "August 2, 1634. 

3. Rev. Roger Williams (1633 to 1636) was born in 
Wales in 1599. He emigrated to this country a resolute non- 
conformist, and arrived at Boston early in February, 1631 — 
six months after the death of Francis Higginson. The Saleui 
church invited him to settle as teacher and colleague with 
Mr. Skelton. He accepted their invitation, and became their 
minister on the 12th of April following. But the governor 
and magistrates interfered and made such opposition to his set- 
tlement, that he was induced to leave Salem before the close 
of the summer, and to become assistant to Mr. Ralph Smith 
in the ministry at Plymouth. The opposition from the civil 
authorities to his remaining in Salem, sprang from certain 
opinions divulged by Mr. Williams soon after his arrival. He 
thought that the ministers and people of Boston had con- 
formed, to a sinful degree, with the English church, and ought 
to declare their repentance ; that the royal patent could give 
them no title to their lands without a purchase from the na- 
tives ; that the civil power could not rightly punish breaches 
of the Sabbath, nor in any way interfere with the rights of 
conscience, — with other offensive opinions of less importance. 
After laboring among the people of Plymouth about two 
years with great acceptance and usefulness, he asked a dis- 
mission, in 1633, upon being invited by the church at Salem 



80 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

to return to them as assistant to Mr. Skelton. He returned 
accordingly, and was sole minister of the church till Novem- 
ber, 1635. At this time the renewed opposition of the mag- 
istrates, strengthened as it was by a treatise he had written 
against the patent, had come to a crisis, and Roger Williams 
was driven from Salem, and became an exile in the wilder- 
ness. He died in Rhode Island in 1683 in the 84th year of 
his age. 

4. Rev. Hugh Peters (1636 to 1641) was educated at 
Trinity College, Cambridge, England. He came to New 
England, Oct. 6, 1635. For some time after his arrival he 
divided his Sabbath labors between Boston and Salem. The 
church at Salem invited him to settle Avith them, and he be- 
came their pastor Dec. 21, 1636. He interested himself in 
reforming the police of the town. He stimulated industry 
and the spirit of improvement. A water-mill was erected, a 
glass-house, salt-works, the planting of hemp was encour- 
aged, and a regular market was established. Commerce re- 
ceived most earnest attention. He formed the plan of the 
fishery, of the coasting voyages, and of the foreign voyages. 
Being frequently absent, Mr. John Fisk, a worthy man from 
King's College, Cambridge, then residing in Salem, assisted 
him in his pulpit. He was assisted also the first year bj Mr. 
George Burdet, who had supplied the pulpit after the de- 
parture of Mr. Williams, and continued in Salem till 1637. 
Mr. Peters was thought a proper person to return to England 
and to represent the sense of the colony upon the laws of 
excise and trade, and with his two colleagues, left the colony 
on the 3d of August, 1641. In England he rose into high 
favor with Cromwell and Ids Parliament, who granted to 
him Archbishop Laud's library, with various rich donations 
from noblemen's estates. The extreme degree to which the 
hierarchy of England were embittered against Peters is in- 
dicated in the following sentences quoted from a letter from 
the Lord Bishop of Chichester to Isaac Walton, quoted by 
Walton, in his "Life of Dr. John Donne" : "Hugh Peters," 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 81 

says his lordship, "a man of loose morals, having been ex- 
pelled in the earlier part of his life from the university of 
Cambridge, became afterward an itinerant preacher in New 
England, Holland, and other countries, and was at length 
appointed one of Oliver Cromwell's chaplains, and a colonel 
in the army. In the pulpit he not unfrequently acted the 
part of a buffoon or merry- Andrew. He used to say that it 
would never be well till 150 — 'the three L's, the Lords, the 
Levites, and the Lawyers,' — were put down." He fell a 
mart3'^r to the cause he had so zealously espoused, on the 16th 
of October, 1660. Mr. Upham's high appreciation of Hugh 
Peters is well known. "Passion, prejudice, and interest," 
he says, in his 2d Century Lecture, "have all combined in 
heaping calumnj'' and reproach upon the character of Hugh 
Peters. But their day has passed, and justice will finally be 
done to the aspersed fame of the martyred and abused phi- 
lanthropist." 

5. Rev. Edward Norris, (1640 to 1659) who had been 
a clergyman in England, came to Salem in 1639, and joined 
the church here in December of that year. Not long after 
his arrival he was duly elected a colleague with Mr. Peters, 
and ordained March 18, 1640. After the departure of Mr. 
Peters, Mr. Norris was sole minister of the church about 
eighteen years. He died Dec. 23, 1659, aged about 70. 
"With Mr. Norris," says Dr. Bentley, "we close the history 
of the ministers of the first generation." 

6. Rev. John Higginson (1660 to 1708) was ordained 
pastor on the 29th of August, 1660, "with prayer and fast- 
ing and imposition of hands." At a meeting of the church, 
Sept. 10th, 1660, it was voted that every member of the 
church, (except the poor,) bring into the deacons half a 
crown so often as might be necessary for the expense ; and 
that on days of humiliation and thanksgiving a contribution 
should be taken for the poor of the church. A public fast 
was appointed for the following, among other purposes : 
"To renew our covenant and to add that clause of taking 



32 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

heed of the leaven of the Quakers." Mr. Charles Nicholet 
was ail assistant to Mr. Higginson in the ministry from 
1672 to 1676, and made himself very popular, and thus 
brought trouble upon Mr. Higginson, who could not agree 
with the people in thinking him worthy to be settled as his 
colleague. For the last twenty-five years of his life, he 
found in Mr. Noyes an associate and friend, in whom he took 
the most cordial satisfaction. Having been chaplain at Say- 
brook for a uMmber of years, Mr. Higginson was settled in 
the ministry at Guilford as colleague with Mr. Henry Whit- 
field, whose daughter he married. Thence he came to Sa- 
lem. He was born at Clay brock, England, August 6, 1616. 
He died in Salem, Dec. 9, 1708, in the 93d year of his age. 

7. Rev. Nicholas Noyes, (1683 to 1717) before preach- 
ing in Salem, had been thirteen years in the ministry at Had- 
dam. At a church meeting, lirst week of November, 1683, 
'^The church, having agreed, did by their vote choose and 
call Mr. Noyes to the office of a teacher in this church." Mr. 
Noyes sustained a high reputation for learning in theology 
and general literature. But with other great and good men, 
he was carried away by the witchcraft delusion. It should 
be remembered, however, that he had the magnanimity after- 
wards to confess his error and make all the reparation in his 
power. Mr. Noyes was never married. He died Dec. IS, 
1717, a few weeks after his lamented colleague, at the age of 
70. 

8. Rev. George Cur win (1714 to 1717) was the son of 
Hon. Jonathan Curwin. He was born in Salem, May 21, 
1683, and graduated at Harvard College in 1701. Having 
been for a number of years an assistant in the ministry with 
Mr. Noyes, he was ordained as pastor and colleague on the 
19th of May, 1714. He died Nov. 23, 1717. His ministry 
was short, but in the highest degree meritorious. He mar- 
ried, in 1711, Mehitable, daughter of Deliverance Parkman, 
a distinguished merchant of Salem. 

9. Rev. Samuel Fisk, (1718 to 1735) was the grandson 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 33 

of John Fisk, already mentioned as assistant to Hugh Peters, 
and afterwards minister of Wenham, and was graduated at 
Harvard College in 1708. He was ordained on the 8th of 
October, 1718. "On this ordination day the assembly met at 
the new church, which was now almost perfectly finished. 
This is the third house erected for the public worship of God 
on the same spot of land on which the first church was built 
in this town, and which was the first in the Province." Sim- 
ultaneous with the settlement of Mr. Fisk waa the formation 
of tJie second church bv members dismissed from the First 
Clinrch to settle Rev. Robert Stanton in the east part of the 
town. Dr. Bentley says of Mr. Fisk : — "He was a man of 
real abilities ; but his high thoughts of church authority pre- 
vented his usefulness, and he was dismissed from the First 
Church in 1735, and accepted a new house provided by his 
friends in the same street, westward on tlie north side of the 
street.* He was succeeded in the old church by Mr. John 
vSparhawk." 

10. Rev. John Spahhawk (1736 to 1755) was chosen 
on the 5th day of August, 17 36, — "at a meeting of the breth- 
ren adhering to the ancient principles of the First Church in 
Salem," as a "meet person to discharge the office of a Gospel 
minister among them." His oi-dination took place on the 
8th of the following December. He died April 30, 1755, in 
the 42d year of Ids age. He left three sons, Nathaniel, John, 
and Samuel, and four daugliters — Priscilla, married to Hon. 
Nathaniel Ropes ; Catharine, married to her cousin Natlianiel 
Sparhawk ; Jane, married to John Appleton ; Susanna, mar- 
lied to Hon. George King, of Portsmouth. 

11. Rev. Thomas Barnard (1755 to 1776) Avas the son 
of the Rev. John Barnard of Andover, and was born Aug. 16, 

*This church was on Essex street, nearly opposite the present Barton 
square church, which was destroyed in the great fire of 1774. In Felt's 
annals it is stated: — 1774, Oct. 6, Rev. Dr. Whitaker's meeting-house, 
custom-house, eighteen dwellings, fourteen stores, shops and barns, be- 
sides sheds and other outhouses, were burned. 



34 MACiAZlNE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

17l(]. lie was installed pastor of the First Church in Salem, 
Sept. 17, 1755. "Mr. Barnard having been taken off from 
his labors by the palsy," says Mr. Felt, "and his son Thomas 
having supplied his place, — the church had a fast, Oct. 31, 
1770, preparatory to the choice of a minister. Mr. Thomas 
Barnard, Jr., and Mr. Asa Dunbar, preached as candidates, 
and upon the choice of the latter, the minority, friends of 
the former, separated peaceably, and established the North 
Society, settling Thomas Barnard, Jr., as their minister. 
The First Church, "for the continuing of peace and brotherly 
love," made an equitable division with them of the "tempo- 
ralities of the church," though it could see no reasons for a 
separation, Mr. Dunbar being "admirably qualified for a 
Gospel preacher." Mr. Barnard died Aug. 5, 1776, aged 60 
years. 

12. Rev. Asa Dunbar (1772 to 1779) was born in 
Biidgewater, May 26, 1745, and was ordained as colleague 
with Rev. Thomas Barnard, July 22, 1772. Mr. Dunbar's 
services were interrupted by the bad state of his health, and 
in a few years he was induced to ask a dismission. 

13. Rev. John Prince, LL. D., (1779 to 1886) was born 
in Boston, July 22, 1751. He was ordained to the pastoral 
care of the First Church in Salem, Nov. 10th, 1779. In 
1817 a legacy of S3000 was received from the late Charles 
Henry Orne, merchant, a worthy member of the church, 
which, when accumulated to 15000, was to form a permanent 
fund for the support of the settled minister of the First 
Churcli. Miss Mehitable Higginson, the sixth in descent 
from the first minister, and the last in Salem to bear that ven- 
erated name, left at lier death a lastinoj memorial of her in- 
terest in the society of the First Church by a generous be- 
quest; also providing that a legacy of 1500 given to the 
Salem Athen<^eum on certain conditions, shoukl, "in case of 
the non-fulfilment of said conditions, go to the use of the 
ministerial fund of the First Congregational Society in 
Salem." In Feb., 1824, at a meeting of the First Congrega 



6850SS 

MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 35 

tional Society, in Salem, called for the purpose, it was voted 
that it was expedient to settle a colleague. Rev. Henry 
Coleman, having preached as a candidate, was earnestly de- 
sired by a considerable portion of the society. A majority, 
however, not being in favor of his settlement, his adherents 
seceded from the First Church, in 1824, and built for him 
the house in Barton square ; and he was installed as their 
minister, Feb. 25, 1825, — Mr. Upham having been recently 
ordained the colleague of Dr. Prince. This secession made 
the fourth religious society in Salem formed from the First, 
in a little more than one hundred years. Dr. Prince was 
liappy in his young colleague, who by his devoted attentions 
cheered and briglitened his latter days, and paid a just and 
eloquent triljute to his memoiy in a discourse preached at his 
funeral. Dr. Prince died on the 7tli of June, 183G, very 
nearly 85 years of age. 

14. Rev. Charles VVentworth Urham (1824 to 1844), 
son of the Hon. Josliua Upham, formerly of Massachusetts, 
and a graduate of Harvard College in tlie class of 1763, was 
born at St. Jolm, New Brunswick, May 4, 1802. He received 
his education at Harvard College. He accepted an invitation 
to settle as colleague pastor with tlie Rev. Dr. Prince, and 
was ordained Dec. 8, 1824. ^Ir. Upham resigned his pasto- 
ral office in December, 1844, from regard to his health, as did 
his predecessor, Mr. Dunbar; — the onl}^ instances of resigna- 
tion among the ministers of the First Church. In his excel- 
lent farewell address, in writing, which was entered upon the 
records of the Society, lie warmly expresses ''the gratification 
with which he contemplated their unanimity, kindness and 
generosity,"^ concluding ''with the most fervent wishes and 
prayers for the welfare of the Society, collectively and indi- 
vidually, and with the liveliest sensibility in the remem- 
brance of all their kindness, fidelity and sympathy. Mr. 
Upham was soon called into public life, and became succes- 
sively a representative of Salem in the General Court, a sen- 
ator from the County of Essex, and a member of the Con- 



36 MAGAZINE OF iSTEW P^NGLAND HISTORY. 

gress of the United States. He had also been Major of the 
city of Salem. 

15. Rev. Thomas Treadwell Stone (1846 to 1852) 
was born at Waterford, Me., Feb. 9, 1801. In June, 1846, 
he was chosen pastor of the First Congregational Society in 
Salem, and was installed on the 12th of July following. Mr. 
Stone's ministry terminated in February, 1852. He had 
greatly endeared himself to many persons in the society ; and 
all, it is believed, entertained for him a high respect, and the 
sincerest good wishes. One thousand dollars was contribu- 
ted at once by members of the society, and cordially presented 
to him upon the close of his ministerial connection with 
them. Mr. Stone afterward settled in the ministry at Bolton, 
Mass., and remained in connection with that church so long 
as he continued free from the physical infirmities of old age. 
Intellectually, we understand his mind remains clear and 
sound, notwithstanding that he is now far advanced toward 
the completion of his ninetieth year. 

16. Rev. George Ware Briggs (1853 to 1867) was 
born at Little Compton, R. I., April 8th, 1810, and was edu- 
cated at Brown University. He graduated. at the Theologi- 
cal School in Cambridge, with the class of 1834, and was set- 
tled in the ministry at Fall River, Sept. 24, 1834. He was 
installed at Plymouth, Jan. 3, 1838, as colleague pastor with 
the Rev. Dr. Kendall. On the 18th of Decembei-, 1852, he 
was invited to settle as pastor of the First Church. His in- 
stallation took place on the 6th of January, 1853. He re- 
signed his office April 1, 1867, and removed to Cambridge, 
where he was settled as minister of the Third Congregational 
Society, to which he still continues to minister. Dr. Briggs 
was always a particularly strong and interesting sermon 
writer and good pastor. He was settled in Salem during the 
period of the war to preserve the Union. His voice and in- 
fluence during that period, both as a minister and citizen, 
were strongly in favor of the Union cause. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 87 

17. Rev. James Teacy Hewes (1868 to 1875) was in- 
stalled Sept. 27, 1868. He resigned August 31, 1875, and 
went to Fitchburg. His health failed him, and he died Nov. 
21, 1882, in Cambridge, of consumption, at the age of 46. 
Mr. Hewes was a good speaker, possessed many popular qual- 
ities, and was a conscientious laborer in the ministry. 

18. Rev. Fielder Israel (1877 to 1889) was installed 
March 8, 1877, and died in office Jan. 4, 1889. Mr. Israel 
was born in Baltimore, June 29, 1825. He was in that city 
at the outbreak of the rebellion, and upheld the side of loy- 
alty to the nation at a time when the secession feeling was 
rampant there. He was reared in the Methodist faith and 
became a preacher in that body. He afterwards grew more 
in sympathy with the Unitarians, and was installed as minis- 
ter of the First Church, March 7, 1877. Mr. Israel was a 
man of broad and liberal views, and was personally of a 
broad and genial nature. He was an able and interesting 
preacher ; and tliere was no mistaking his kind heart, his 
genuine interest in luimaiiity, and his earnest desire to do his 
Master's will. 

[The above recently ap[)eared in tlie Salem, Mass., Ga- 
zette, in connection with an account of the installation of 
its new minister. Rev. Mr. Cressly. The article was compiled 
by Hon. Caleb Foote, from a pamphlet written by the late 
Daniel A. White, Es(p, who was for many years a leading 
member of the First Church. — Ed.] 



The Times have Changed. — ''From an old manuscript 
recently brought to light," notes the New Bedford Standard, 
''it appears that on the 2oth of the fifth month, 1822, the 
popuUition of Nantucket was 7266, composed of 1423 fami- 
lies, with 911 dwelling houses. At this time there were 36 
oil and candle factories and 7 rope-walks in successful opera- 
tion. The maritime list enumerates 80 ships, 6 brigs. Id 
schooners, and 59 sloops, all actively emplo^'^ed. Scarcely a 
vestige of the Island's former industries and maritime im- 
portance remain, and the population is less than half what it 
was in 1822." 



38 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



A Document with a History. 




__il.HERE was lately found, among a packet of old bills, 
receipts and other personal papers on their way to a 
junk shop, a document that is historic, not because of 
"^ the name that is attached to it, but because it may be 
said to have led up to the bloodiest tragedy of the Revolu- 
tion. The results of a great struggle are not always wholly 
the outgrowth of the actions of those who occupy public at- 
tention by their places in, or under the government. This 
was essentially so with regard to the Revolution. Its tri- 
umph was due to many causes, and one that is now acknow- 
ledged to have been largely instrumental in swaying public 
opinion in Great Britain, was the depredations of the Ameri- 
can privateers which preyed on the commerce of that coun- 
try. The merchants of London, Bristol, and other British 
ports, who found their cargoes failing to reach the people to 
whom they were consigned, because the privateers of Con- 
necticut, Massachusetts and other colonies diverted them to 
the uses and advantages of the patriots, became so emphatic 
in their demands for peace, that their voices penetrated to the 
councils of the Ministers of King George, and forced Lord 
North and his colleagues to listen. . 

Perhaps no place was more active in this privateer business 
than New London, Conn., whose people had long been noted 
for their enterprise in ocean traffic, and whose captains were 
brave, daring and ready in expedient. But while many ves- 
sels were fitted out in New London, and sailed under cap- 
tains who were identified with the place, the names of Hard- 
ing, Hinman, Leeds, Starr, the Sal tons tails and others being 
among the number, the money and enterprise that made their 



MAGAZINE OF KEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 39 

deeds possible, was contributed by people scattered all through 
the inland towns and villages of the east, as well as those lo- 
cated on the seaboard. Among these, Adam Babcock, of 
Westerly, seems to have been very prominent, because he 
spurred others on to assist, and made extraordinary exertions 
from his own resources in this direction. He appears to have 
traveled between different localities, and to have sought in 
all, help for his enterprises ; and during the years 1780 and 
1781, to have been largely instrumental, while remaining in 
Boston, in fitting out in New London the privateer brigantine 
Minerva, which sailed on a cruise early in the June of the 
last-named year, capturing, just south of the coast, the ship 
Hannah, said to have been the most valuable prize taken dur- 
ing the war, and whose seizure created such a turmoil among 
the merchants of Great Britain, that the descent on New 
London, which terminated in the burning of that place by 
Arnold, and in the massacre of the troops in Fort Griswold, 
September 6, 1781, was determined on. 

Thus the letter of instruction which follows, becomes, as 
previously stated, historic, for it is the instructions of the 
owners of the Minerva, sent to the commander of that ves- 
sel before she sailed on the cruise that resulted in the capture 
of the Hannah : 

Boston, May 27, 1781. 

vSiR : — The private armed Brig:t. Minerva, mounted with sixteen six- 
pounders, which You are commissioned to command on a Cruise against 
the enemies of the United States of America — being now completely 
equipped and ready for Sea — you will embrace the first favorable Wind 
to get out, taking every proper precaution to avoid the British fleet, 
should they be off your port as here-to-fore. 

Your cruising ground we leave the choice of to You. only would observe 
that it is our Wish You should not cruise off either New York or Charles- 
town — the clanger appearing much greater than the prospect of advantage 
in that quarter. If You are fortunate eno' to take any prizes. You 
will order them into this port. Should they by distress of Weather ar- 
rive at any out port You will direct the prize masters to give me informa- 
tion by express of their situation and follow such directions as I may 
think best for our Interests with regard to such prize. 

With my best wishes for Your success, victory and safety^ I am, in be- 
half of the Owners of Five-Eighths of the P. Brigt. Minerva, 

Your most affectionate Friend and Brother, 

Adam Babcock, 



40 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

P. S. On coming- home off Your Cruise I would advise you to keep 
well to the eastward so as to come in thro' the Vineyard Sound, where 
you can get the needed information of the situation of the British fleet. 
As soon as you get to New London you will lose no time in clearing the 
vessel for a second trip. 

Once more sincerely Yours, 

A. B. 

Dudley Saltonstall, Esq., Commdr. of the private arm'd Brigt. Miner- 
va, laying at New London. 

This is, then, tlie letter that sent the Minerva to sea, and 
while there she captured the Hannah. For this capture, and 
because the place had indeed become a thorn in the side of 
British commerce, it was determined to punish it, and thus 
avenge the capture of the Hannah, and all previous wrong- 
doing of the kind. The expedition of Arnold, the burning of 
New London and the bloody baptism of Fort Griswold followed. 
These might have taken place had the Hannah sailed into 
New York in safety, but that they so quickly succeeded the 
uproar her capture caused in the mercantile circles of Great 
Britain, is significant. That the capture and destruction of 
New London was not intended as a force to recall Washing- 
ton and his army from before Yorktown, is proved by the im- 
mediate departure of Arnold — the same express that carried 
the news of the enemy's capture and destruction of the town 
bearing the word of his retreat, thus showing that there was 
no necessity for Washington's return. 

Another fact brought prominently before us by this docu- 
ment, is the action of Dudley Saltonstall. Appointed the sec- 
ond Captain on the first navy list,he took an active part in the 
expedition under Commander Hopkins to New Providence. 
When the navy was reorganized, he became number four in 
the list of captains. In command of the Trumbull, 28, he 
fought a spirited action, and made valuable prizes, trans- 
ferred to the Warren, 32, he was in command of the naval 
part of the expedition sent to destroy the British posts on the 
Penobscot river, in Maine. The publicity given by the press 
to the purpose of the expedition, gave the enemy informa- 
tion which led to its failure, and the destruction of the fleet 
under Commodore Saltonstall by a superior IWce, commanded 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 41 

by Sir George Collier. For this result, Commodore Salton- 
stall was in no way to blame ; it was a circumstance of war, 
unfortunate, but not to be avoided : yet the Continental Con- 
gress, with its usual want of justice in such matters, dis- 
missed Commodore Salstonstall. He did not, however, sulk 
in his tent, but immediately entered the privateer service, 
and proved as spirited and energetic in this duty as he had 
been in the Regular Navy. 

Thus the document is not only linked to the burning of 
New London, and the tragedy enacted in Fort Griswold, but 
it is also linked to the name of a man who served his coun- 
try in her hour of peril, and served her well. — TJioma^ S. Col- 
lier in the Collector. 



Fortifications on the Plscataqua River.— Fortitica 

tions on the Piscataqua river, N. H., were begun by the 

original pro})rietors, who sent over several cannon, winch 

tlieir agents placed on the north-east point of Newcastle, at 

the north of the great-liarbor called Fort Point. They laid 

out ground about a ''bow shot" from the waterside to a higli 

rock, on which it was intended, in time, to build a principal 

fort. In 1666, it was decided by commissioners to build a 

fort on tlie east side of Great Island, where the former one 

was built, and which was to inclose the great rock and all the 

easterly part of the island. The customs and imports on 

goods imported into the harbor were to be applied to the 

maintenance of the fort, and the trainbands of Great IsLand 
and Kittery Point were discharged from all other duty, 
to attend to the service of it under Richard Cutts, who was 
appointed captain. At a town meeting of Kittery, Me., held 
in June, 1666, it was voted ''that every dweller and liver in 
this town, over sixteen years of age, shall work at the fort 
one whole week." 



On July, 31, 1830, a great hail storm visited Newton, 
Mass. Many stones weighed from lialf a pound to a pound. 
Much glass was broken, and a special tax became necessary 
on the pews of the First Baptist meeting house to repair the 
extensive damage. 



42 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Record of the Second Church in the North Parish 

of New London, (now Montville) Conn., 

from 1722 to 1740. 



CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY A. BAKER, ESQ. 



Baptisms bg f^cv, tJanoes ]-lillhouse. 
1722. 

May. — Charles, son to Charles Campbell. 

" Cuy, son to George Richard. 

June. — James, son to Jonathan Noble. 

" — Thomas Scarritt, adult. 

*' — Jonathan Minor, " 
July 29. Ebenezer Williams, adult. 

" Hannah, daughter to Ebenezer Williams, 

"• Sai'ah, '' " " " ■ 

Aug. 5. Stephen, son to Josiah Baker. 

" Sarah, daughter to " 
Sept. 2. Jonathan Wickwire, adult. 

Alpheus, son to Jonathan Wickwire. 
Katherine, daughter to Jonathan Wickwire. 
Oct. 7. Agnes, daughter of James Dixon. 
Oct. 28. Peter Wickwise, adult. 

" Patience Wickwise, wife of Peter. 

" Ann Brown, wife of James. 

" Ann, daughter to James Brown. 

" Lydia Malsworth, wife of Philip. 

'• Lydia, daughter to Philip Malsworth. 

" Sarah, • " "' " " 

" John, son " " ^ 






MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 43 

Oct. 28. Philip, son to Philip Mais worth. 

" Jonathan, '' " " " 

" Richard, '' " " " 

" Mary, dan. " " " 

Nov. 11. Thomas, son to John Viber. 

" 18. Katherin Horton, adult. 

'' " Patience Rowse, " 
Dec. 16. Israel Dodge, " 

" John Dodge, " 

" Ann, daughter to John Dodge. 

" Hannah, daughter to John Dodge. 

" Thomas Dodge, adult. 

" David, son to Thomas Dodge. 

" William Dodge, adult. 

" Samuel Dodge, " 

" Elizabeth Dodge, wife of Thomas. 
Dec. 30. Dorothy, daughter to Robert Denison. 

1722-3. 

Jan. 1^0. Jonathan; son to Sanuiel Avery. 
Feb. 10. Joslnia Comstock, adult 

" Mercy Horton, adult. 

" Agnes, daugliter to Mathew Atchison. 

Feb. 17. Mary Comstock, adult. 

" Daniel Comstock, '' 

" Benjamin '' " 

" Juela Morgan, " 

*' Sarah Morgan, 

" James, son to Samson Horton. 

" Sarah, daughter to Samson Horton. 

" Jonathan, son to Kinsley Comstock. 
Mch. 10. Jolm, son of John Dodge. 

1723. 

Mch. 24. George Minor, adult. 
Aaron Fargo, '" 

Deborah, daughter to Robert Denison. 
Sarah, daughter to James Scarrot. 






i. 

ii 



if, 



44 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Mcli. 24. Sanili, daughter to James Johnson. 

Apr. 10. Jonathan, son of Jonathan Morgan. 

Abigail, daughter to Johnathan Morgan. 
Phebe, daughter to Jonathan Moi'gan. 
Katherine, daughter to James Hall. 

14. Christian Fairbanks, wife of Samuel. 

14. Ann Chappell, adult. 

Apr. 21. John, son to Stephen Maples. 

Stephen, son to Stephen Maples. 
Waitstill, daughter to Benjamin English. 
28. John, son to John Steel. 

Nov. 25. Ezekiel, son to Ebenezer Williams. 
1723-4. 

Mch. 15. Peter, son to Peter Wickwire. 
1824. 

Apr. 3. Lebeaus, son to Samson Horton. 

" Jeremiah, son to Peter Comstock. 

May 24. Mary, daughter to Jonathan Christy. 

" Thomas, son to James Dixon. 

Aug. 30. Jerusha Plorton, adult. * 

Sept. 21. Christopher Wickwire, adult. 

" Ichabod, son to Christopher Wickwire. 

'' Salmon, '' " " '' 

'' Nathan, " " '' " 

"- Elizabeth, dau. " " " * 

1724. 

Sept. 21. Mary, daughter to Christopher Wickwire. 

Oct. 4. John, son to James Hall. ■ 

Nov. 22. James, son to Samuel Irving. 

Dec. 20. Joseph, son to Jason Allen. 

" Sarah, daughter to John Viber. 
1724-5. 

Jan. 10. Thomas Fargo, adult. 

Mch. 14. James, son to Charles Campbell. 
1725. 

Apr. 13. James, son to James Johnson. 



Magazine of new England history. 



45 



Apr. 17. 
June 5. 

^' 20. 



a 



(; 



cfc 



Aug. 8. 



41 






21. 


Sept. 


25. 


Oct. 


30. 


Nov. 


14. 


172£ 


»-6. 


Feb. 


6. 


1726. 


Oct. 


23. 


a 




Nov. 


20. 


Dec. 


11. 


a 


18. 


1727 


• 


Apr. 


^0. 


i(. 




May 


7. 


i,i 


14. 


u 


28. 


June 


25. 


July 


1. 


!,(, 




;i 


16. 


Oct. 


8. 


1727- 


-8. 


Mch. 


3. 


172^ 


I 


June 


9. 



Mary, daughter to Matliew Atchison. 
Sarah, daughter to Stephen Maples. 
William, son to William Minor. 
Jonathan, son to William Minor. 
Mary, daughter to William Minor. 
Grace, daughter to William Minor. 
John, son to William Whiting". 
Elizabeth, daughter to John Dodge. 
Thomas, son to Thomas Dodge. 
Mary, daughter to Samuel Avery. 
Nathan, son to John Stoll. 
Joseph, son of Kinsley Comstock. 
Dorothy, daughter to Ebenezer Williams. 

Agnes, daughter to John Anderson. 

James, son to Christopher Wick wire. 
Elizabeth, daughter to Robert Denison, Jr. 
John, son to James Dixon. 
Margaret, daughter to Jolm Viber. 
Square John, son to James Ilillliouse. 



Samuel Fox, adult. 
Margaret Fox, wife of Samuel. 
Maiy, daughter to Adonijah Fitcli. 
John, son to Matlievv Atchison. 
Samuel, son to William Whiting. 
Ephraim, son to Samuel Avery. 
Joel, son to John Dodge. 
James, son to John Anderson. 
Ruth, daughter to Samuel Atwell. 
William, son to Stephen Maples. 

Edward, son to Joshua Raymond. 

George, son to Peter Wick wire. 



46 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

William, son to James Hillhouse. 
William, sou to William Whiting. 
Otis, son to Johu Thompson. 
John, son to Josiah Baker. 

Dorotliy, daughter to McClarion. 

Jedediah, sou to John Nobles. 
Zebediah, son to Jolui Nobles. 

Clai'isa, daugliter to Ebenezer Hortou. 
Sarah, daughter to Adonijah Fitch. 

Martha, daughter to Peter Comstock. 
Sarali, daugliter to Joseph Comstock. 
Ann, daughter to Daniel Tuttle. 
Jeremiah, son to Gideou Comstock. 
Mary, daughter to Nathaniel Comstock. 
Christopher, son to Joshua Raymond. 
Lydia, daughter to Alexander Baker. 
Caleb, son to William Whiting. 
Daniel, son to John Dodge. 
Mary, daughter to Abraham Aver3^ 
Mercy, daughter to Stephen Nobles. 

Zebediah, son to Christopher Wickwire. 
Ann, daughter to John Viber. 
Mary, daughter to Robert Denison. 

James Abraham, son to James Hillhouse. 
Stephen, son to Ebenezer Horton. 
James, son to James Otis. 
James, son to William Dixon. 
Stephen, son to Jason Allen. 
Thomas, son to Abraham Avery. 
Ann, daughter to John Mason. 
Achia, daughter to l*eter Wickwire. 
" 8. Benjamin, son to Samuel Atwell. 



Aug. 


26. 


Aug. 


26. 


Oct. 


10. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


13. 


Oct. 


17. 


Oct. 


17. 


1728-9. 


Jan. 


20. 


Mch. 


16. 


1729. 


Apr. 


6. 


June 


8. 


(.1. 


8. 


J une 


29. 


July 


20. 


c. 


27. 


1.1, 


27. 


Aug. 


3. 


Sept. 


25. 


cc 


25. 


Dec. 


11. 


1729-30. 


Mch. 


22. 


ii. 


22. 


ii. 


22. 


173C 


). 


May 


16. 


ik 


24. 


July 


12. 


Ci 


12. 


Aug. 


31. 


Oct. 


18. 


1,1, 


26. 


Nov. 


8. 



1780-1. 


Feb. 


14. 


(C 


14. 


1731 


• 


Apr. 


25. 


May 


23. 


Sept. 


26. 


a 


26. 


173-2 


• 


Jan. 


5. 


June 


29. 


44 


29. 


J uly 


1. 


44 


1. 


44 


1. 


Sept. 


2. 


44 


9 


44 


2. 


44 


2. 


44 


9 


44 


2. 


44 


2. 


Nov. 


4. 


.4 


10. 


44 


18. 


1733. 




May 


27. 


June 


24. 


4w 


24. 


44 


24. 


Aug. 


26. 


Sept. 


9. 


44 


9. 


44 


21. 


44 


21. 


44 


21. 



Magazine of jsiew England history. 47 



Elizabetli, daughter to Joseph Bradford. 
Lucretia, daughter to Samuel Raymond. 

Elizabeth, daughter to Daniel Tuttle. 
William, son to William Wliiting. 
Johanija, daughter to Ebenezer Williams. 
Mary, daughter to Peletiah Bli.ss. 

Mary, daughter to John Mason. 
Elizabeth, wife of Isaac Avery. 
Margaret, daughter to Isaac Averj^ 
Jemima, daughter to John Dodge. 
Ephraim, son to Ephraim Wells. 
Margaret, daughter to Samuel Fox, Jr. 
James Morgan, adult. 
Susanna Morgan, wife to James. 
James, son to James Morgan. 
Benjamin, son to James Morgan. 
Lucretia, daughter to James Morgan. 
Elizabeth, daughter to James Morgan. 
Stephen, son ta Samuel Comstock. j 
Ebenezer, son to Ebenezer Horton. 
Hannah, daughter to Abraham Avery. 
Ebenezer Rogers, adult. 

Sarah, daughter to Samuel Fox, Jr. 
Ainia, daughter to Samuel Atwell. 
JerusliM, daughter to Samuel Atwell. 
Jabez, son to Ebenezer Williams. 
Mary, daugliter to James Otis. 
Samuel Rogers, adult. 
Prudence, daughter to Samuel Rogers. 
Grace Rogers, wife of Daniel. 
Esqr. Joseph, son to Adonijah Fitch. 
Elizabeth, daughter to Elisha Mirick. 



\ 

48 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Sept. 21. Kstlier, daugliter to Elisha Miiick. 
1734. 

June K). Anna, daugliter to Thomas Fargo. 

" 80. William, son to Joseph Bradford. 

Oct. 16. Joseph, son to Peter Wickwii'e. 

Nov. 3. Sarah and Martha, dau's to Nathaniel Comstock. 

Dec. 22. Sarah, daughter to Gilbert Lilly.' 

1735. 

June 8. William, son to Patten. 

Sept. 28. Elizabeth, daughter to Adonijah Fitcli. 

Nov. 28. Anna, daughter to Samuel Johnson. 

'' 28. Rachel, daughter to Daniel Fitch. 

1736. 

Feb. 1. Rachel, daughter to James Hillhouse. 

Mch. 5. Abigail Patton, adult. 

April 9. Elizabeth, daughter to James Otis. 

'' 17. William, son to Alexander Patterson. 

'^ 17. Martha, daughter to Alexander Pattei'son. 

1737. 

Dec. — Daniel, son to Daniel Fitch. 

Samuel, son to John Bradford. 

1738. 

June — Mary, daughter to Gilbert Lilly. 

1740. 

April — Mary, daughter to Daniel Fitch. 

May — Joiui, son to John Bradford. 

June — Margaret, daughter to Alexander Johnson. 

Aug. — James, son to Samuel Johnson. 



JVIarriagcs bg f^ev. dames J^Illl^ouse frotiQ 1724 to 1740. 
1724. 

May 19. Sylvester Baldwin and Elizabeth Avery. 

Nov. 5. John Thompson and Mary Otis. 

" 5. John Denison and Patience Grazell. 

" 9. John Anderson and Margaret Dixon. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 49 

1724-5. 

Jan. 12. Phinily Hallack and Margaret Young. 

Feb. 24. Jonathan Church and Abigail Fairbanks. 

1725. 

Mch. 25. Edward Rogers and Sarah Gorton. 

Oct. 27. James Morgan and Susanna Rogers. 

1727. 

May 15. Josiah Weeks and Levina Stebbens. 

" 27. John Perkins and Lydia Malsworth. 

Nov. 25. Patrick McClellen and Dorothy Otis. 

Dec. 25. Thomas Dixon and Mary Morgan. 

Nov. 14. Elisha Mirick and Grace Rogei's. 

" 21. John Way and Mary Hohnes. 

1727-8. 

Feb. 12. James Fitch and Anna Denison. 

" 12. Nathaniel Comstock and Margaret Fox. 
1728. 

April 4. Daniel Tuttle and Sarali Comstock. 

May 25. Thomas Collit and Mary Rogers. 

"^ 30. James Camp and Sarah Malsworth. 
1728. 

June — James Otis and Sarali Tudor. 

Julv 4. Jolm Brown and Dorotliv Noves. 

Sept. 17. Jolui Mason, Jr., and Mar}^ Copp. 

1729. 

Apr. 15. John Anderson and Susanna Morgan. 

1730. 

Nov. 12. Samuel Fox, Jr., and Abigail Harris. 

1734. 

Mch. — Abraham Simons and Rebecca Chapman. 

'' 27. Joseph Atwell and Martha Comstock. 

April — Rev. Joseph Lovet and Anna Holmes. 

May 3. Jabez Lathrop and Delight Otis. 

Aug. 21. Phalan and Abigail Wliitney. 

Dec. 15. Samuel Jolmson and Atwell. 



50 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

1734-5. 

Jan. 29. Cai'ey Latliam and Dorothy McClellancl 
1735. 

Apr. 3. William Frink and Abigail . 

Aup". 4. Jonathan Harris and Rachel Otis. 

1736. 

Dec. 15. John Bradford and Esther Sherwood. 
1738. 
Dec. 21. Alexander Johnson and Susanna Fox. 



Early Population of Plymouth Colony and Massa- 
chusetts. — The first regular Census of the entire popula- 
tion, either of the Colony or Province of Massachusetts was 
made in 1765. 

The popnlation of the Plymouth Colony was much less 
than that of Massachusetts. Estimated to have numbered 
51 persons in Noveml)er, 1621, 100 in 1622, and 180 in 1624, 
it had increased in 1633 to nearly or quite 400, and in 1637 to 
about 550 persons Sufficient grounds exist for the conclu- 
sion that in 1654 the population of this colony was 2,941, and 
that in 1665 the popidation had increased to about 5,310. 
From other data, again, we learn that in 1673 the nvimber of 
inhabitants was 9.410. 

The population of Massachusetts — not including the Ply- 
mouth Colony, wliich maintained a distinct government until 
1691 — was, in 1629, only about 500, eight years later, in 
1637, nearly 7,900, and in 1639, 8,600. 

During fifteen years previous to 1643, 21,200 passen- 
gers had come over from England to this colony ; but, about 
the year 1640, emigration nearly ceased, concurrently with 
the change of affairs in England, and many of the first settlers 
returned thither. Accordingly, computations based on relia- 
ble data show that the entire population of the colony was, in 
1654, only about 16,026, and again in 1665, not exceeding 
23,467. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 51 




Record of Marriages, by Rev. Gardner Thurston, 
pastor of the Second Baptist Church, New- 
port, R. I. 1759-1800. 

EV. GARDNER THURSTON was pastor of the Sec- 
ond Baptist Chiircli, Newport, R, I., from 1759 until 
^, May, 1800. During tliis time lie married 1105 couples, 
keeping a faithful record of eacli marriage. We are 
indebted to Mrs. Edward Seabury, of Ncav Bedford, Mass., 
for the following copy of tlie original record. All the pai'ties 
mentioned, unless otlierwise specified, were of Newport, R. I. 
— [Ed. 



Tliomas Roofers and Rebeckah Shearman; 
Jolni Shearmand and Ann Lyon. 
Joseph Sheffield and Elizabeth Clagget, 
Joseph Phillips and Hannah Sanford. 
Thomas Eyres and Amey Tillinghast. 
John Hudson and Mary Wever. 
Natlianiel Langley and Deborah Caswell. 

John Jep and Ann Sabines. 

Comfort Allin and Miriam Mill ward. 

John Dunham and Elizabeth Phillips. 

Amos Peterson and Catharine Warrin. 

Jose})h Peckham and Susannah Mumford. 

William Tilley and Elizabeth Rogers. 

Jonathan Maxon and Lidia Clarke. 

Enos Peckham, Middletown,R. I., and Ann Hovey 

NcAvport. 
John Wyatt and Martha Magrah. 
William Gardner and Mary B asset t. 



1759 


. 


June 


rr 
i . 


bW 


17. 


Ifc 


21. 


cc 


28. 


Jnly 


12. 


C^ 


12. 


1,1, 


22. 


Aug. 


9. 


a 


19. 


Sept. 


20. 


Oct. 


7, 


ii. 


14. 


1,1, 


28. 


Nov. 


15. 


ki 


18. 


i,i 


22. 


Dec. 


5. 



52 MAGAZINE OP NEW ENGLAND HIST^ORY. 



Thomas Tew and Ann Clarke. 
Joseph Sims and Maryan Curtis. 
Josiali Rogers and Elizabeth Rogers. 

Paul Braiddison and Jean Sabins. 

Orbid Wing and Sarah Green. 

Alexander Gillis and Ann Sabins. 

Audley Clarke and Margaret Rowland. 

Barnet Hill and Mercy Rogers. 

Alexander Mullin and Mary Chapman. 

Robert Leonard and Ann Stonal. 

Ebenezer West and Weight Carr. 

Thomas Huse and Elizabeth Walker. 

William Earl, Portsmouth, R.L, and Sarah Chase, 

Freetown. 

I 

Gideon Lawton and Lucy Howland. 
James Clarke and Mary Rogers. 
William More and Peace Burden. 
Giles Barker and Mary Tew, Middle town, R. I. 
Samuel Tripp, Portsmouth, R. L, and Sarah Tomp- 
kins, Middletown, R. L 
Samuel Wedon and Abigail Langworthy. 
Thomas Chadwick and Dorothy Eldridge. 
Daniel Austin and Ann Austin. 
Benjamin Congdon and Catharine Ta3dor. 
John Gardner and Mary Gardner. 
John Colverd and Mehitibel Thurston. 
William Spenier and Sarah Chase. 
James Carpenter and Avis Tillinghast. 
Othnial Tripp and Sarah Creapon. 
Daniel Shrieve and Mary Green. 
Joseph Tillinghast and Mary Cranston. 
John Hicks and Ann Thompson, 
Caleb Jeffries and Jerusha Dyre. 
James Anderson and Ann Champlin. 



1751 


). 


Dec. 


6. 


(,i 


15. 


ti 


23. 


1760 


» 


Jan. 


17. 


a 


17. 


u 


23. 


Feb. 


7. 


n 


10. 


a 


14. 


a 


21. 


i(. 


22. 


Mch. 


2. 


a 


9. 


a 


10. 


a 


13. 


(( 


16. 


Apr. 


13. 


J une 


15. 


July 


3. 


ii, 


13. 


Aug. 


3. 


Aug. 


9. 


i,i 


U. 


ii 


14. 


Sept. 


IL 


a 


15. 


(,i 


29. 


Oct. 


1. 


a 


9. 


n 


9. 


1,1, 


17. 


(( 


20. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 53 

George Gey and Hannah Smith, 

Daniel Wilcox and Sarah Clarke. 

William Greenman and Susanna Gardner. 

William Joy and Mary Phillips. 

Jonathan Caho6n and Ruth Phillips. 

John Davenport, Tiverton, and Sarah Weeden, 

Portsmouth. 
John Bridges and Elizabeth Gardner. 
John Battey and Ann Dayton. 

Gideon Tomlin and Mary (jrant. 

David Nichols and Elizabeth Docotay. 

Joseph Anthony and Elizabeth Sheffield. 

Philip Bazell and Susanna Moses. 

Amos Sheffield and Mary Herrington. 

William Wilson and Catlierine Tliurston. 

Jethro Spooner and Jeruslia Barkei*. 

Robert Cozzens and Jean CaswelL 

James Talford and Margery Stanton. 

Walter Clarke and Abigail Phillips. 

Samuel Little Billings and Elizal)eth Vinson. 

Thomas Ninneofrett, the Indian Sachem of Charles- 

town, R. I., and Mary VVhitefield, Newport. 
Thomas Goodman and Sarah Campbell of Newport. 
William IVIorgan and Mar}^ Richardson. 
William Pollock, of South Kingstown, R. I., and 

Sarah Pate, of Newport. 

14. Alexander Huling, of North Khigstown, and 
Sarah Freeborn, of Newport. 

15. Jolni Springer and Judith Holding, of Newport. 
'' 18. James Clarke and Anne Moses, of Newport. 

'' 21. Sumner Smith and Mariba Havins. 

"- 28. Zebedee Grinnell, of Little Compton, and Sarah 
Rider of Newport. 
June 7. John Sheldon and Mary Sabins. 
July 12. Charles Willit and Barshaba Rogers, of Newport. 



Oct. 


23. 


u 


27. 


Nov. 


27. 


ii, 


30. 


Dec. 


3. 


a 


11. 


a 


18. 


a 


28. 


1761 


^ • 


Feb. 


3. 


a 


15. 


Mch. 


11. 


a 


15. 


a 


18. 


u 


19. 


!,(, 


26. 


April 


[ 4. 


kfc 


19. 


(,i 


19. 


a 


21. 


1,1, 


23. 


May 


7. 


i,i, 


10. 


<,i 


12. 



(C 



(fc 



July 


12. 


a 


19. 


Aug, 


. 9. 


(( 


20. 


(i 


iw«y. 


Sept. 


5. 


a 


17. 



54 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Gideon Tanner and Mary Ling, of Newport. 
John Carr and Mary Arnold, of Newport. 
Thomas Price and Mehitible Chase. 
Pinnies Gilbert and Sarah Clarke. 
Jeremiah Phillips and Pheby Phurchase. 
Thomas Hill and Mary Wilber. 
Ichabod Congdon, of New London, and Mary 

Fowler, of Newport. , 

Oct. 15. Benedick Smith, of Jamestown, and Patience 

Easton, of Newport. 
Nathan Luther and Judah Tucker. 
William Slocum, of Jamestown, and Mary Bill, 

of Newport. 
Thomas Brooks and Elizabeth Hull. 
Daniel Critts and Elizabeth Pluntington. 
James Smith and Catharine Edmonds. 
Charles Young and Patience Brayton. 
John Grindall Gardner and Abigail King. 
George Brown and Mercy Mortimore. 
John Rogers and Mary Walshire. 
William Ladd and Sarah Gardner. 

John Caswell and Hannah West. 

John Price and Mary Bentley. 

Robert Taylor and Mary Lion. 

Richard Story and Elizabeth Carr. 

John Card and Sarah Hoar. 

Samuel Young and Ann Smith. 

Benjamin Barns and Asa Remington. 

Edward Keeney and Patience Chad wick. 

James McDonald and Lidia Mollinena. 

Charles Dyre and Mary Hazard. 

John Witson and Elizabeth Millard.- 

James Rogers and Hannah Smith. 

John Walford and Ann Little. 

William Grinnell and Lidia Tillinghast. 

Jas. Martin and Elizabeth Brown, of Middletown. 



a 


25. 


44 


29. 


Nov. 


5. 


44 


15. 


44 


15. 


44 


20. 


44 


29. 


Dec. 


13. 


44 


24. 


44 


27. 


176i 


> 


Jan. 


1. 


44 


3. 


44 


10. 


'.4 


28. 


Feb. 


IL 


Mch. 


9. 


44 


17. 


April 


[ 1. 


44 


13. 


44 


22. 


May 


16. 


44 


26. 


June 


6. 


44 


17. 


»i 


21, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 55 

Benj. Trowbridge and Eunice Thomolin. 
William Wilbour and Ann Wilbour. 
Thomas Manning and Martha Pryor. 

Thomas George and Freelove Bennett. 
Pel eg Sherman and Patience Sherman. 
Joshua Godfry and Mary Coopper. 
John Meckins and Ann Powers. 
William Rider and Mary Shearman. 
Constantine Hammett and Mary Young. 
Peleg Barker and Mary Stevens. 
Nathaniel Potter and Priscilla Lawton. 
Green Rogers and Elener Green. 
Charles Spooner and Mary Gaidner, of Pouts- 
mouth, R. I. 
Joshua Albro, Newport, and Caroline Dring, Ports- 
mouth, R. I. 
Caleb Coggeshall and Pheby Card, Middle- 
town, R. I. 
14. Nehemiah Rhodes, Cranston, R. T., and Abigail 

Thomas, Newport. 
20. Benjamin Vose and Sarah Clarke. 
2-i. James Milward and Pheby Card, Newport. 
Dec. 5. John Sparks and Abigail Carter. 

" 5. Jess' Lilibridge and Margaret Summers. 
" 23. Paul White and Phebe Lewis. 

(To be Continued.) j*^'^ 



July 


11. 


(( 


21. 


Aug. 


1. 


Sept. 


5. 


(( 


27. 


a 


27. 


a 


27. 


Oct. 


10. 


a 


13. 


a 


21. 


Cl 


24. 


(( 


25. 


a 


28. 


a 


28. 


Nov. 


14. 



a 






The first marble (juarry opened in Vermont was at Dorset, 
in 1785, six years before the State was admitted into the 
Union. People came hundieds of miles to get the crude 
slabs for fire-place stones and other domestic uses. In 1808 
a second quarry was opened, and subsequently many others, 
including those of Sutherland Falls, West Rutland and Cen- 
tre Rutland. The channeling ])i'ocess, now familiar to mining 
engineers, was introduced in 1841 ; the first derrick for hoist- 
ing the blocks, in 1848; the first tunneling, in 1859. In 
1818 the first attempt at sawing marble was made, but it wa§ 
many years before the experiment proved successful. 



56 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Queries. 



]4istorical. 

1. Fort Independence, Boston Harbor. — Some time 
ago I found the following notice among some papers and let- 
ters belonging to my grandfather, a native of Boston, Mass. 
I would like to know if the stone mentioned is still in exis- 
tence. 

Chicago^ III. T. H. 

^' AFTER the destruction of Castle William (now called 
Fort Independence) by the British, the following lines were 
found engraven on one of the stones among the ruins of that 
beautiful fortress: 

anno decimo tertio 

Regni GULIELMI, Tertit, 

Mag: Brit: Fr: et Hib: REGIS Serenissimi, 

HocMUNIMENTUM 

Ex EJUS Nomine, WILHELMI Castellum: 

nuncupatum fuit inceptum; 

Anno Secundo 

Regni ANN^, Mag: Brit: Fr: et Hib: 

REGIN^ Serenissimi, 
Perfectum Annoq: Domini MDCCIII. 

a tribuno 

WOLFANGO WiLHELMO RoMBRO, 

Regiatum Majestatum, 

Septentrionali America, 

Architecto Militari Palmario Constructum. 

Translation. — In the 13th year of the reign of William 
the third, the most serene Prince of Great-Britain, France, 
and Ireland, this fortification was begun, (being called CAS- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 57 

TLE WILLIAM, from his name) was finished in the second 
year of the reign of the most serene Ann, Queen of Great 
Britain, &c., and in the year of our Lord, 1703. Built by 
Capt. William Wolfangus Romer, an able engineer to 
their Majesties in North-America." 

2. QuiNNATissET, CoNN. — Where can I find an account of 
the town, or village, of Quinnatissit, Conn.? I think it is 
mentioned in a description of Eliot's memorable visit to 
Woodstock, Conn., in 1674. G. R. 

3. An Invitation to Settle in New England. — Who 
was the author of the following lines: — 

"So farewell England old 

If evil times ensue, 
Let ^ood men come to us. 

We 1} welcome them to New." 

I find them quoted in an old book, printed in 1713. 

C. ILL. 

4. Ringing the Bells at three O'clock. — In a pam- 
phlet before me, giving a description of the St. Albans, Vt., 
raid, in 1864, I read: — "Several strangers boarded at the 
hotels for a few days, and learned the habits of the people. 
When the bells rang at 3 o'clock, on the 1 9th of October, 
these men entered the banks in parties and robbed them of 
their funds, while otliers of the band arrested every citizen in 
the street," &c. I have twice written to parties in St. Albans, 
asking for information on the subject, but received no reply. 
Will not some one of the readers of the Magazine tell us why 
the bells rang at 3 o'clock on that day. Is it one of tlie cus- 
toms of the place? If so it will be interesting to know some- 
thing of its origin. Qu.ero. 



Genealogical. 

5. Eddy or Ady. — William Ady and Hannah Smithy were 
married in Bristol, R. L, July 19, 1697. She was the daughter 
of Richard and Joyce Smith, who came from Boston and set- 
tled in Bristol in 1680. When and where was the said William 
Ady or Eddy born? When and where did he die, and where 



58 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

was he buried? What is his ancestry? (Notes. William and 
Hannah (Smith) Eddy had the following children born in 
Bristol: Joseph, b. Aug. 26, 1699, William, Elizabeth and 
John, b. June 17, 1707. Joseph m., Ruth Belcher of Brain- 
tree, Mass., daughter of Grecjory and Elizabeth (Ruggles) 
Belcher, Oct. 10, 1728.) 
Providence, R. I. Edson Salisbury Jones. 

6. Notice to Town Clerks. — If every Town Clerk in the 
New England States who sees this notice, will examine his 
town Records of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, and will send, 
me a copy therefrom of every entry of a Pullen birth, death 
or marriage, he may find; I will remit his fee bill for making 
copy, on receipt of same. 

Memphis, Tenn. Chas. L. Pullen. 

7. Pullen.— A. In the records of the City of Boston, 
Mass., I find the following: 

Abraham Pullen and Mary Ward were married September 
17, 1703. 

Joseph Pullen and Elizabeth Dennis were married Novem- 
ber 29, 1716. 

John Pullen and Mary Marjory were married July 10, 1713. 

Richard Pullen and Elinor Andrews were married Decem- 
ber 6, 1705. 

I would like to obtain some trace of the descendants of any 
one or all of them. 

B. In 1744 there was living in Attleboro, Mass., a Mr. 
Jas. Pullen. Wanted : the place and date of his marriage to 
Miss Lydia Woodcock, which occurred prior to his settling in 
Attleboro, Mass. 

C. William Pullen, a son of John Pullen of Swansea, 
Mass., and Marcy Randall of North Providence, R. I... the 
daughter of Henry Randall of said town, were married in 
North Providence, R. I., April 23, 1786. Wanted; the names 
of their children, places and dates of birth, places and dates 
of marriage and places and dates of death. 

Memphis, Tenn, Cha§. L. Pullen, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 59 

8. Parker. — Information would be gladly received re- 
garding the family of Artemas Parker, who, at about 
1810, moved to the State of Vermont. This is all that 
is known of him by the undersigned. He had a large family, 
of whom one son was named Rodolphus. 

10 Hawley St., Worcester. Theo. Parker. 

9. Rev. John Crandall. — In the winter of 1888-9, A. P. 
Crandall of Palmyra, N. Y., in connection with the writer 
published a '^Genealogj^ of abranch of the Crandall Family," 
copies of which may be found in many of the Historical and 
Genealogical Societies of New England. In this publication 
the chain of descent runs back unbroken to Rev. John Cran- 
dall, a Baptist minister, who followed Roger Williams to 
Rhode Island because of the general persecutions of the Mas- 
sachusetts colonies, on account of creed. So far we have not 
been able to trace his career beyond 1635-6. From what port 
he sailed, at what port he landed, and the date; the location 
and character of his ancestry in the old Country (Wales), all 
these items of interest to the present generation, have been a 
matter of study and investigation with no tangible results. 
The colonial records show that the Rev. John Crandall and 
his children ligured largely in church and state at Newport, 
Providence and Westerly, R. I , and it seems strange that so 
far we have been unable to find any record l)eyond 1635. 
The destroyed records of Salem might have solved some of 
these points — as yet we have no clew. Any light which can 
be given of him previous to l()o5, will be most gratefully re- 
ceived, and any trouble involved in the research, here or 
abroad, will be })r()perly remunerated. Genealogists will 
please take notice. 

Chattanooya, Ten a. W. I. Crandall. 

10. ('RANDALL. — lolin (a'audall Jr. of Newport, R. I., had 
by his wife Elizabeth Gorton, five children, namely: John, 
Peter, Samuel, Elizabeth and Mary. Can any one give dates 
of birth of these and tell whom each married. 

E. G. Davis. 



60 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Book Notes. 



[Publishers and authors wishing a notice in this department should send 
copies of their publications to R. H. Tilley, Newport, R. I.] 



Barrington on the Narragansett as a place of 
Residence is the title of a finely illustrated book, compiled 
and published by the Rural Improvement Association of the 
town of Barrington, R. I. The purpose of this sketch of the 
town is to direct attention to Barrington as a place of resi- 
dence. Among the illustrations are "View near Congrega- 
tional Church ;" ''View at Rumstick ;" "View from Anna- 
womscutt ;" "View at Nayatt ;" "View near Barrington 
River;" "Episcopal Church ;" "View from Prince's Hill ;" 
"View from Nayatt ;" the new "Town Bnilding f ' "View in 
Brownsville ;" "Town Beach ;" "Barrington Ridge ;" the 
"R. R. Stations at Drownsville, Nayat, and Barrington Cen- 
tre ;" "New Meadow," and others. Price, $1. Copies of 
this beantifully printed and very handsomely illustrated 
work may be had on application to O. S. Anthony, Secretary 
of the Association, Drownsville, R. I. 

The Wights : A Record of Thomas Wight, of Ded- 

HAM AND MeDFIELD, AND OF HIS DESCENDANTS. — This is a 

carefully prepared genealogy by William Ward White, con- 
taining 357 pages. Published in Milwaukee, Wis., 1890 
It contains a record of ten generations of the Wights of 
America, and a chapter on the Wights not connected with 
the family of Thomis. It also includes a valuable list of au- 
thorities, and numerous fac-similes of the signatures of early 
members of the family. 



magazine of new england history. 61 

Some of the Descendants of John and Elinor Whit- 
ney, WHO SETTLED IN WaTERTOWN, MASS., IN 1635. — Mr. 

William L. Whitney, the compiler of this work, has made it 
as complete and thorough as could be desired by any mem- 
ber of the family, although it does not purport to be com- 
plete. It contains 101 pages, published at Pottsville, Penn., 
1890. From it we learn that the name Whitney is of Saxon 
origin, and that there is a Parish of Whitney in Oxfordshire, 
Eng. In early days of English history, the family seat was 
in Herefordshire. The book contains a carefully prepared 
index. 

Fra Lippo Lippi. — Margaret Vere Farrington has written 
a romance founded on the life of Fra Lippo Lippi, the Italian 
painter, who lived from 1412 to 1469. A very pretty book, 
containing fourteen pliotogravure illustrations, printed on 
thick paper, has been made of this art story. Lippi is intro- 
duced as a Carmelite monk who has been selected to make 
decorations in the convent chapel of Santa Marghartia at 
Florence, in the days when tlie Holy of Holies was turned 
into a picture gallery, often painted by unworthy hands, and 
when artists, in painting Madonnas, did not hesitate to repro- 
duce the features of women well known to lead unseemly 
lives. The romsince is connected witli a beautiful young 
novice, who is of noble birth, but is about to take vows and 
leave the Avorld. Lipj)i confesses his love, and on tlie day 
she sliould have taken vows they disappear togetlicr. The 
book contains 225 pages. Printed by the Knickerbocker 
Press, New York. G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1890. 

History of the Old South Church, Boston, iMass. — 
The third edition of this valuable work has recently been is- 
sued by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., Boston. Mr. Hamilton 
Andrews Hill, the author, has been exceptionally fortunate, 
not only in his theme but in laboring for and with a cluirch 
whose ample means and cultured taste have made possible, 
and approved, so elaborate and well illustrated a record of 
rich annals. The two large octavo volumes which contain 
the History of the Old South Church, from the year 1669 to 



62 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

1884, print in full, for about a century and a half, the records 
of the cliurcli. The portion extending fi'om 1821 to tlie 
present day contains only the more noteworthy events of the 
pastorate of the various ministers of the Old South. When 
writing the earlier history of the church, Mr. Hill was fortu- 
nate enough to have liis attention called to an old manuscript 
in the library of Yale University, relating to the Old South 
Church, prepared by a committee of the church in 1693 or 
1 694, g-ivinof a relation of the circumstances which led to the 
formation of this society. This document, the church records 
ali'eady spoken of, with extracts from the diaries of John 
Hull, Samuel Sewall, and Joseph Sewall, and. investigation 
in tlie libraries of the New England Historic-Genealogical 
Society, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Boston 
iVtlienaeum, tlie Boston Public Library, the University Li- 
brary at Cambridge, the Congregational Library, Boston, 
and tlie Seminary Library at Andover, together with advice 
and aid from many high authoiities on the subject in ques- 
tion, have enabled Mr. Hill to give his book a degree of com- 
pleteness which leaves nothing to be desired. Not only doc- 
uments, but also fac-similes accompany tlie work, with two 
full-page etchings, several steel portraits and numerous care- 
fully executed engravings on wood —8 vo. #10.00. 



A99oar;)Ccn9e9ts. 

[In this department compilers of local or family history may insert a 
notice of their intention to publish. If publishers and authors will send 
their circulars to the editor, a notice will be made up in the office and 
published free of charge.] 



The Button Family. — Mr. VV. Tracy Eustis, No. 19 Pearl 
St., Boston, Mass., is compiling a Genealogy of the Descend, 
ants of John Button, who was in New England in 1630. 

The Moseley Family.— Mr. W. Tracey Eustis is at 
work on the Mosely family, descendants of Thomas Moseley? 
who landed in Borchester, Mass., in 1635. Send information 
and orders to him at No. 19 Pearl St., Boston, Mass. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLANB HISTORY. 6S 

V 

Ladd Family. — Mr. Warren Lacld, 677 County St., New 
Bedford, Mass., is compiling a genealogy of the descendants 
of Daniel Ladd of Haverhill, Mass., Joseph Ladd of Ports- 
mouth, R. I., John Ladd of Charles City County, Va., and 
John Ladd of Burlington, N. J. The book will be published 
by E.Anthony & Sons, New Bedford, and will contain about 
300 pages. Price, ^S. Send orders to Mr. Ladd. 

HiGLEY Family. — At a reunion of the Higley family, held 
in Simsbury, Conn., Aug. 20 and 21, 1890, a committee con- 
sisting of Warren Higley, of New York city, Edwin H. Hig- 
ley, of Groton, Mass., and Albert C. Bates, of East Granby, 
Conn., were appointed to publish the history of the family, 
which had, for some time, been in course of i)reparation by 
Mary Coffin Johnson, the family historian. Tlie book will 
be a fine octavo volume of about 450 pages, printed on good 
paper, illustrated and bound in ap[)ropriate and attractive 
style. The edition will be limited to MOO copies, and sold to 
subscribers at $5.0u per cop}'. Send orders to Hon. Warren 
Higley, 120 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Williams Family. — Prof. Edward Higginson Williams, 
Jr., 117 Church street, Bethlehem, Penn., has been engaged 
for twenty-two years in compiling the records of the descend- 
ants of Robert Williams, of Norwich, England, who sailed 
thence for New England, April 8, 1687. The work is to be 
a complete statistical recoi'd of each child of the Williams 
})arentage, and of the children and grandcliildi-en of the fe- 
male members of the family. 

Parker Family. — Mv. Theodore Parker, 10 Hawlev St., 
Worcester, Mass., lias made researches for several years, re- 
garding the Parker famil}^ in America, having in preparation 
the genealogy of the Parkers of Lexington, Mass. He cor- 
dially invites all interested to correspond with him. 

PuLLEN Family. — Mr. Charles Pullen, of Memphis, Tenn., 
has, for the past two years, been engaged in the preparation 



64 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of a Genealogical history of the Pullen family in America* 
He will be j)leased to correspond with all interested. 

Lamb. — I am gathering material for a genealogy of 
the Lambs of the United States who are of New Eng- 
land descent. Would like to hear from any genealogist 
who finds the name in original records. Will reciprocate by 
something, if possible, on his family from a collection of obit- 
uaries, local histories, old newspapers, &c. 

Wt^st field, N. Y. Fkank B. Lamb. 



WA^ITS. 



[This department is open to subscribers only.] 



I>ancroft's History of the United States. — I desiie 
to purchase Vol. 4, of Bancroft's History of the United 
States, Centenary edition. Boston : Little, Brown & Co., 
1876. A good price will be paid for a fair copy. 

Newport, R. 1. R. H. TiLLEY. 

Newport County History. — I wish to exchange one 
copy of the Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island for one 
copy of the History of Newport County (R. L,) I'ecently pub- 
lished. 

. Providence, R. 1 , Box 81. J. O. Austin. 



^fe- 



JVI^GAZINE OfJ\(eW ^NGLANDjflSTORY 

Vol. 1. APRIL. 1891. No. 2. 

Robert Williams of Roxbury, and his 

Descendants. 



BY EDWARD H. WILLIAMS, JR., OF BETHLEHEM, PENN. 




HE following is an attempt at the early family record 
of Robert Williams, of Roxbury, a record that has 
proved puzzling to all who attempted to unravel its 
intricacies. The author of the "Williams Family" 
(1847), gave him a brother Nicholas; two wives, Elizabeth 
Stratton and Martha Strong ; four children, Samuel, Isaac, 
Stephen and Thomas, and two unknown grandchildren, 
(named in his will) Deborah Totman and Elizabeth Robin- 
son. A coat of arms was attriljuted to him, and a probability 
expressed that he came from an ancient family of Williams, 
of Flint, named by Thoresby (Ducatus Leodiensis), though 
no attemj)t was made to trace his ancestry, beyond citing a 
family tradition that he came from Norwich, England. 

Savage (Genealogical Dictionary) adds a wife Margaret, 
widow of John Fearing of Hingham, Mass , and children, 
Mary, wife of Nicholas Wood (on the assurance of Mr. Clap), 
and John (from tlie record of his death, intestate, and the 
possible entry in the Roxbury church record, where a daugh- 
ter Elizabeth is admitted to membership), though he notes 
that the parent may be Robert rather than John. He doubts 
the existence of wife Martha and son Thomas, as no mention 
of them occurs in any of the Roxbury records. He also 



66 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

doubts the age attributed to the first wife Elizabeth Stratton, 
and this doubt will present itself to each one who compares 
her age, as given by the record, with the dates of the births 
of her three youngest children, and with the age of Robert 
as given later on. 

W. H. Whitmore (American genealogist) notices the book 
of 1847, above given, and states that the right to use the coat 
of arms is not proven. Others have touched upon various 
branches of the family in magazine articles, pamphlets, and 
one small book ; but, with the exception of the brochure of 
Mr. Weld French, nothing has been added to the facts noted 
above. 

After nearly a quarter of a century of interest in the sub- 
ject, the following seems to have been the status of the first 
four generations of the family of Robert Williams. As a 
history of the steps by Avhich the facts have been obtained 
would be too extended for a magazine article, a mere skeleton 
of the record will be given. The data will be discussed in 
the forthcoming family record. As one or two of the state- 
ments here made are not yet fully proven, this article aims to 
draw attention to them, so that their defects maybe rectified, 
or the statements themselves disproved. 

1. Robert^ Williams seems to have been born in Eng- 
land in 1608 (Embarkation record and the record of Rev. 
William Williams, of Hatfield, agree on this point). He 
was a "Cordwynar" of Norwich Co., Norfolk, England, 
for at least a short time before sailing, April 8, 1637, in the 
*'John & Dorethy of Ipswich," Wm. Andrews, Master, "Fo. 
newengland to Inhabitt." It is probable that he came of the 
extensive family of the name near Norwich, which reaches 
back to a considerable antiquity, and which has probably 
given others of the name to New England. His first wife, 
Elizabeth Stalhan, may also have come from the neighbor- 
hood, as similar records have been found. She died at Rox- 
bury, Mass., July 28, 1674, "aged 80 years." Robert Wil- 
liams married, second, at Hingham, Mass., Nov. 3, 1675, 
Margaret, widow of John Fearing of Hingham. She died 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 67 

at Roxbury, Dec. 22, 1690. The third wife, Martha Strong, 
or Story, is either a myth, or he married Martha, widow of 
Deacon William Parke, as the dates of death and the ages of 
the two Marthas are identical. The first supposition is more 
probable. Robert did not bring his brother Nicholas with 
him, but did bring four children, Elizabeth, Deborah, John 
and Samuel, and two servants, Mary Williams, aged 18 years, 
and Anne Williams, aged 15 years. Mary was the second 
wife of Nicholas Wood, before mentioned, and Anne was 
probably his third wife and survived him. (See his will.) 
Robert Williams died at Roxbury, Sept. 1, 1698, aged 86. 
Nicholas Williams died there Aug. 27, 1692. 

After a study of Thoresby, Burke, and other writers on the 
English gentry, the conclusion is forced that Mr. Whitmore 
was right in his comment, and that the coat of arms in the 
work of 1847 belongs to the family of Mathew, and did so 
belong before the origin of the "Ancient family of Williams 
or Flint." Sir George Williams took the arms of Mathew 
with the name, as is commonly the case ; but, even if the 
coat were that of Williams, there is nothing to show that 
Robert was of the Flint family. The chances are that he 
will be found to have belonged to as ancient a family near 
Norwich, as has been stated. As searches are now being- 
made, and as tlie matter is still in embryo, notliing will be 
said regarding what has already been proved from wills and 
records in England. The children were all by the first wife. 
They were : 

Elizabeth^, b. in England ; 

Deborah^ b. in England ; 

John^, b. in England ; d. at Roxbury, Oct. 6, 

1658, unmarried and intestate ; 
Samuel^ b. in England, 1632 ; 
Isaac^ b. at Roxbury, Sept. 1, 1638 ; 
Stephen^, b. at Roxbury, Nov. 8, 1640 ; 
Thomas^. Probably authentic, from similarity 

of name to many in England. Date of birth 

and death unknown. Family tradition states 

that he died in youth. 



2. 


I. 


3! 


11. 




111. 


4. 


IV. 


5. 


V. 


6. 


VI. 




VII. 



68 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

2. Elizabeth^ Williams. Admitted to the church at 
Roxbury in 1644. She was the mother of Elizabeth Robin- 
son, as none of the other children could have been the parent 
of that grandchild. Elizabeth Robinson was probably the wife 
ofWm. Robinson of Concord-Newton-Watertown. Jonathan 
Robinson, son of the above, left a copy of the will of Richard 
Cutter among his papers, endorsed "For the two Robinson 
grandchildren of the deceased," which seems to show that 
Elizabeth Robinson was the daughter of Richard Cutter of 
Cambridge. Richard Cutter had two wives, and a daughter 
Elizabeth by each. Bond gives a diite of death of the first 
one ; but the "Cutter Family" a later publication, says that 
the date of her death is unknown. There have been instan- 
ces of the same name having been given to a second child 
when the first of the name was living. If Bond be right in 
saying that Mary, daughter of Jonathan and Mary {French) 
Hyde, was the wife of Nathaniel Hammond, there were two 
Marys in the family alive at the same time, as the Supreme 
Court records show that Mary, wife of Eleazer Williams, 
was daughter of Jonathan Hyde by his second wife Mary, 
daughter of John Rediat. The two cases will be exactly 
parallel. If, therefore, Elizabeth Robinson, above, be the 
daughter of Richard Cutter, she must have been by the first 
wife, as the second Elizabeth was but two years old at the 
date of birth of the eldest Robinson child, and the first wife 
of Richard must have been Elizabeth Williams, daughter of 
Robert. They were married in 1644. Elizabeth^ died at 
Cambridge, March 5, 1662. Her age was unknown, but 
given as "about 42," which would make her older than her 
husband, who died June 16, 1693, "about 72." Children : 

7. I. Elizabeth^, b. July 15, 1645 ; 

II. SamueP, b. Jan. 3, 1647 ; d. unmarried ; 
in. Thomas^, b. July 19, 1648; according to one ac- 
count he "died soon"; to another he married 
Abigail , had 4 ch. and d. prob. 1693 ; 

8. IV. William^, b. Feb. 22, 1650; 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 69 

9. V. EphraimS, b. 1651 ; 
10. VI. Gershoni'^, b. June, 1653 ; 
VII. MaryS, (or Marah.) 

3. Deborah^ Williams married in tlie early part of 
1648, John Turner of Roxbury, next-door-neighbor, but one, 
to her father, as his second wife. Their first child was born 
and their first two children were baptized at Roxbury. They 
probably removed to Medfield in 1649, as they are found at 
that place as original proprietors in the next year. Part of 
their Roxbury estate was sold to Deacon William Parke of 
Roxbury. Deborah^ died at Medfield in 1676, and John in 
1705, having previously mari'ied a third wife named Alice. 
Children ; 

Deborah'^, baptized Jan. 14, 1649 ; 

John^, b. March 3, 1651 ; 

Isaac'^, b. 1654 ; 

Mary3, b. Nov. 18, 1658; 

SamueP, b. 1661; d. unmarried, at Medfield; 

Saralr"^, b. 1663 ; 

Abigail'^ b. 1667 ; • 

Hannah'^, b. 1670 ; d. unmarried, at Walpole. 

4. SajNIUEL^ WiLLiAisis, shoemaker, deacon, etc., lived at 
Roxbury; married March 2, 1654, Tlieoda, eldest daughter 
of Deacon William and Martha (Holgrave) Parke, of Rox- 
bury, and sister of Martha, who mariied his brother Isaac. 
Theoda was born July 26, 1637, and, after the death of Sam- 
ueP, Sept. 28, 1698, married Stephen Peck (not Park, as 
given by Savage ; see gravestone at Roxburj'-, and Se wall's 
diary for note of her funeral), and died August 2, 1718. 
Children : 

I. Elizabeth'^ b. Feb. 1 ; d. March 10, 1655 ; 

17. II. SamueP, b. April 27, 1656 ; 

III. Martha*^, b. April 29, 1657 ; d. Feb. 6, 1661 ; 

IV. ElizabetlP, b. Feb. 11, 166U, m. Stephen, 3d son 



11. 


I. 


12. 


11. 


13. 


III. 


14. 


IV. 




V. 


15. 


VI. 


16. 


VII. 




VIII. 



18. 


VI. 


19. 


VII. 


20. 


VIII. 


21. 


IX. 


22. 


X. 


23. 


XL 




XII. 



70 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of Stephen, Jr., and Anne ( Chickering) Paine 
of Rehobotli, b. Nov. 23, 1654 ; d. March 12, 
1710; she died, s. p. before August, 1707 ; 
V. Theoda3, b. July 27, 1662 ; d. of small pox Feb. 
8, 1679 ; 

John3, b. Dec. 10, 1664 ; 

Ebenezer^, b. Dec. 6, 1666 ; 

Deborah^, b. Nov. 20, 1668; 

Martha-^ b. May 19, 1671 ; 

AbigaiP, b. July 12, 1674 ; 

Parked b. Jan. 11, 1677; 

Unnamed^ infant, b. and d. April 17, 1680. 

6. IsAAC^ Williams ; weaver, captain, deacon, etc., at 
Newton, Mass., married Martha Parke, mentioned before, 
1660. She was b. March 2, 1642, and d. at Newton, Oct. 
24, 1674, whither they removed immediately after marriage, 
and settled on 500 acres purchased by her father from Major 
Samuel Shepard. Isaac married second, Nov. 13, 1677, Ju- 
dith, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (^Smith) Hunt of Re- 
hobotli, and widow of Nathaniel, son of Thomas Cooper of 
the same, by whom she had had three children. She died in 
1724, and Isaac^, Feb. 11, 1707. Children : 

I. Isaac^, b. and d. March 7, 1661; 
Isaac^ b. Dec. 11, 1661 ; 
Martha^ b. Dec. 27, 1663 ; 
William^, b. Feb. 2, 1665 ; 
Johns, b, Oct. 31, 1667 ; 
Eleazer^, b. Oct. 22, 16o9; 

Hannah^, b. Oct. 8, 1671, married (2d wife) John, 
son of Job and Elizabeth {Fuller) Hyde of 
Newton, born February 1, (Bond), Dec. 1, 
(Jackson), 1681-2; died before 1739; she d. 
8. p. April 28, 1739. 
29. VIII. Elizabeths, b. Oct. 8, 1671 (twin.) 

IX. Thomas^, born Dec. 23, 1673. Jackson says that 
he sold, 1708, his part of his father's estate ; 



24. 


II. 


25. 


HI. 


26. 


IV. 


27. 


V. 


28. 


VI. 




VII. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOBY. 71 

but East Cambridge records do not show this 
to be a fact. As he did not join in the pro- 
test to his father's will, and as he is not men- 
tioned in it, he probably died before his father. 
There Avas, however, a Thomas Williams at 
Newton, later, who by wife Lydia ( Child) had 
a daughter Lydia, b. July 22, 1754. It may 
have been his son. 

Children by the second wife : 

I. Peter^, b. August 31, 1680 ; d. unmarried, 1732 ; 

30. II. Sarahs, b. Oct. 2, 1688 ; 

31. III. Mary^ b. Oct. 2, 1688 (twin) ; 

32. IV. Ephraim3, b. Oct. 21, 1691. 

6. Stephen^ Welleams: farmer, captain, etc.,at Hoxbury, 
m. 1666,Sarah,daugliter of Joseph and Mary (Thomson) Wise 
of Roxbury, b. Dec. 19, 1647 ; d. 1728 ; he d. Feb. 15, 1720. 
Children: 

8arah'\ b. August 13, 1667; 

Mary^ b. Dec. 20, 1669 ; 

Elizabeth^, b. Oct. 1, 1672 ; 

Bethia^, b. April 26, 1676; 

Stephen^ 1). August 27, 1678 ; 

Robert^, b. July 13, d. October 30, 1680 ; 

Joseph^, b. Feb. 24, 1682 ; 

John'S, b. January 16, 1684 ; 

Henry^, b. April 9, d. August, 1686 ; 

Graced b. April 2, 1688; 

Catharine'^ b. April 2, 1690; d. June 14, 1707; 

Thomas^, b. July 27 ; d. September 1, 1694. 

7. Elizabeth'^ Cutter (Elizabeth'^, Robert^). Married 
(probably) William Robinson. The first two children were 
born at Concord ; the rest at Newton ; Elizabeth'^ died at 
Newton : W^illiam at Watertown. They lived at Newton on 
a farm of 200 acres immediately adjoining that of Isaac^ 
Williams. The homestead came to his son William^; thence 



33. 


I. 


34. 


II. 


35. 


III. 


36. 


IV. 


37. 


V. 




VI. 


L o. 


VII. 


39. 


VIIL 




IX. 


40. 


X. 




XL 




XII. 



72 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

to gmndson Joliii^; thence to Jonathan^ Williams {haac^^ 
Isaac^ Isaae^, Robert'^). Children: 

I. Elizabeth^ b. at Concord ; 
II. Hannah*, b. at Concord, July 13, 1671; d. at Cam- 
bridge, October 5, 1672 ; 

III. Williams b. at Newton, July 10, 1673 ; wife's name' 

Elizabeth, who d. in 1747 ; he d. 1754, and 
named in his will, brothers Jeremiah and Robert, 
late of Newton ; 

IV. MaryS b. August 7, 1676 ; 
V. Davids b. May 23, 1678 ; 

VI. Samuels b. April 20, 1680; 

VII. Jonathan*, b. April 20, 1682 (according to Jackson, 
though the will of the father makes Samuel and 
Jonathan twins) ; settled at Lexington ; (See 
Hudson) ; 
VIII. Roberts b, unknown; alive in 1754. 

8. William^ Cutter (Ulizaheth^, Robert^). Carpenter 
Cambridge : married Rebecca Rolfe, who died November 23? 
1751, aged 90 ; he died April 1, 1723. Children : 

I. Elizabeths b. March 5, 1681 ; 
II. Richards b. November 13, 1682 ; married Mary Pike 
at Woodbridge, N. J., where he resided ; 

III. Mary,* b. February ; died April 2, 1685 ; 

IV. Hannahs b. May 20, 1688 ; 

V. JohnS b. October 15, 1690 ; Deacon, married Lydia 
Harrington; died January 21, 1776 ; 
VI. RebeccaS b. January 18, 1693 ; 

VII. Williams b. 1697 ; baptized September 16, 1700 ; 
married Anne Rice, who died May 19, 1753 ; 
VIII. Samuels b. June 14, 1700 ; married Anne Harring- 
ton ; died September 27, 1737 ; 
IX. Sarahs baptized October 18, 1702 ; 
X. Ammi RuhamahS b. May 6, 1705 ; Harvard College, 
1725 ; minister to North Yarmouth, Me. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 73 

9. Ephraim^ Cutter (Elizabeth'^, Robert^}. Glazier at 
Charlestown and Watertown-farms ; married Betliia, daugh- 
ter of Nicholas and Mary ( Williams) Wood of Medfield, 
February 11, 1679. She died September 18, 1731, in her 72d 
year. Children : 

I. Ephraim*, b. August 9, 1680, at Brookfield ; 

II. Jonathan*, b. May 5, 1685 ; 

III. Bethia*, b. December 2, 1686 ; 

IV. Mary*, died young ; 

V. Hannah*, b. July 22, 1690 ; 
VI. John*, b. July 28, 1700. 

10. Gershom'^ Cutter {Elizabeth?', Robert^). Married 
Lydia, daughter of Thomas and Isabel Hall of Charlestown, 
March 6, 1678 ; died April 2, 1738. Children : 

I. Gershom*, b. June 1, 1769 ; married Mehitable Ab- 
bott, June 11, 1701 ; 
II. Lydia*, b. September 14, 1682 ; 

III. Hannah*, b. November 26, 1684 ; 

IV. Isabel*, b May 9, 1687. 

11. Deborah^ Turner {Deborah^, Robert^). Married 
November 18, 1668, Jabez, son of John Totman (written 
Tatman in^ the records of the time) of Iloxbury, b. Novem- 
ber 19, 1641 ; d. April 16, 1705 ; Deborah2 died May 31, or 
June 1, 1689. He married, second, somebody by the name 
of Davis. Cliildren : 

I. Joanna*, b. September 28, 1670 ; d. unmarried. 

II. Deborah*, baptized August 10, 1673 ; 

HI. Elizabeth*, b. December 9, 1675, '^died of ye pox" 

November 30, 1678 ; 

JV. Unnamed infant*, b. and d. August, 1678; 

V. Mary*, baptized December 26, 1680, d. Aug. 8, 1681 ; 

VI. Mehitable*, baptized May 2, 1682 ; 

VII. Sarah*, b. November 9, 1683 ; d. June, 1684 ; 

VIII, John*, b. October 13, 1685 ; wife's name, Mary. 



74 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

12. JoHN''^ Turner {Deborah?-^ Robert^). Soldier in 
Mosely's conipany? Settled in the south part of Medfield ; 
married 1677, Sarah, daughter of Edward and Lydia {Rock- 
wood) Adams, of Medfield, b. May 29, 1660. He died in 
1710. Children: 

T. Deborah*, b. and d., 1679 ; 

II. John*, b. 1681 ; married 1703, Mary, daughter of 
John and Mary (Metcalf) Fisher of Medfield ; 

III. Stephen*, b. 1684 ; married 1712, Judith, daughter 

of John and Mar}^ (Metcalf) Fisher ; 

IV. Edward*, b. 1688 ; married 1745, Mercy, daughter 

of Joseph and Mercy Wight of Medfield ; s.p.; 
Y. Ebenezer*, b. 1693 ; married Esther, daughter of 
Joseph and Mary ( Wight) Clark, of Medfield. 

13. IsAAC^ Turner (Deborah'^ Robert^). Married 1682, 
Rebecca, daughter of John and Rebecca ( Wheelock) Crafts, of 
Roxburj^, b. August 28, 1660. After the death of Isaac^ in 
1694, she married John Rockwood in 1708. Children: 

I. Rebecca*, b. 1682; married James, son of Nathaniel 
and Mary (^Frlzzell) Allen of Medfield ; 
II. Elizabeth*, b. 1684. 

III. Samuel*, b. 1686, married 1711, Mary, daughter of 

Josiali and Mary (Twitchell) Rockwood of Med- 
field. He died at Medfield in 1755 ; 

IV. Isaac*, b. 1688 ; 
V. Philip*, b. 1689. 

14. Mary^ Turner (Deborah^^ Robert^). Married John, 
son of John and Joanna Parker of Newton ; b. at Cambridge, 
December 15, 1651 ; died at Newton, October L713. She d. 
March, 1715. Children : 

I. John*, b. August 17, 1687 ; first wife, Esther ; sec- 
ond wife, Hannah Pierce of Weston ; d. 1672 ; 

II. Mary*, b* March 3, 1690 ; married Robert Fuller of 
Needham ; 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 75 

III. Deborahs b. February 11, 1693 ; 

IV. Sarah^ b. March 24, 1695 ; died unmarried 1724 ; 
V. Thomas*, b January 9, 1699, removed to Worcester. 

15. Sarah^ Turner {Deborah? Robert^). Married (sec- 
ond wife) 1696, John, Jr., son of John and Jane \_Da7n0n 
(Medfield Records), Dummer (Savage)] Plimton of Medfield, 
born June 16, 1650, died January 13, 1704. She died 1738. 
Children : 

I. Sarah*, born 1700 ; died 1706 ; 

II. Elizabeth*, born 1702, married Jonathan, son of Mi- 
chael and Elizabeth (^Bowen) Metcalf of Medfield. 
He died 1725. 

16. Abigail^ Turner {Deborah^, Robert^). Married 
Samuel, son of Seth and Mary {Thurstoii) Smith of Medfield, 
born 1665, died 1698, and she married second, 1706, Joseph, 
3d son of Joseph, Jr., and Mary {Allen} Clark of Medfield, 
born June 14, 1664. She died 1756. Children by first mar- 
riage : 

I. Mary, born 1690 ; 

II. Samuel, born 1693, married Hannah, daugliter of 
Ebenezer and Hannah {Clark) Mason of Med- 
field. He died 1719. 

Children l)y second marriage : 

I. Abigail, born 1711, married 1730, Henry, son of 
Henry and Mary (Adams) Smith of Medfield. 
She died at Walpole. 

17. Samuel^ Williams {SamneP, Robert^). Roxbury, 
married February 24, 1680, Sarah, daughter of John, Jr., and 
Sarah \_{Brewer) Bruce] May of Roxbury, born September 8, 
1659, died December 29, 1712. He married second, April 
28, 1720, Dorothy, daugliter of Thomas, Jr., and Dorothy 
( Whiting) Weld of Roxbury, born April 2 or 28, 1664, and 
widow of William Denison of Roxbury. He died August 8, 
1735. Children: 



76 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

I. Samuel^ b. April 6, 1681, married Deborah, daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Bethia Scarborough, of Rox- 
bury ; 
II. Theoda^ b. December 8, 1682, married Samuel, 
brother of Deborah just mentioned ; 

III. John^ b. December 1, 1684, married Sarah, daughter 

of Joseph and Sarah {Faxon} Weld of Roxbury ; 

IV. Unnamed infant^ born and died January 1, 1687 ; 
V. Sarah^ b. May 19, 1688, married John, son of John 

and Hannah ( Curtis') Polly of Roxbury ; 
VI. Ebenezer*, b. August 12, 1690, married Penelope, 

daughter of John and Hannah (^Talcott) Chester 

of Wethersfield, Ct. ; 
VII. Elizabeth*, b. January 12, 1693, married (2d wife) 

Samuel, son of Samuel and Martha ( Woodhridge) 

Ruggles of Bellerica, Mass.; 
VIII. Eleazer*, b. February 20, 1695, married Sarah, dau- 

of Thomas Tileston, of Dorchester, Mass. ; 
IX. William* b. April 24, 1698, married Sarah, daughter 

of Joseph and Joanna ( Winchester) Stevens of 

Roxburv; 
X. Martha*, b. August 10, 1701, married Thomas, son 

of John and Anne {Lake) Cotton of Brookline, 

Mass. ; 
XI. Unnamed infant*, died July 25, 1704. 

18. Rev. John'^ Williams {SamueP, Robert^). Minister 
at Deerfield, Mass. ; married July 21, 1687, (Nhn. Rec), 
Eunice, daughter of Rev. Eleazer and Esther ( Warham) 
Mather of Northampton, Mass., b. August 2, 1664; killed by 
the Indians March 1, 1704. He married second, her cousin 
(whereat some comment) Abigail, daughter of Thomas and 
Abigail (^Warham) Allyn, of Windsor, Conn., born October 
17, 1672, died June 21, 1754. He was seized with apoplexy 
June 8, and died on the morning of June 12, 1729 ; captured 
February 29, 1704, with the rest of the citizens of Deerfield, 
and taken to Canada. Daughter Eunice remained among 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 77 

the Indians, and some of her descendants are probably living 
at Caughnawaga, Canada. Children by first wife : 

I. Eleazer*, b. July 16, 1688, married Mary, daughter 
of Rev. Nehemiah and Sarah (^Jackson) Hobart 
of Newton, first minister to Mansfield, Conn. ; 
XL Samuel^ b. January 24, 1690, died, unmarried, June 
30,1713; 
III. Esther*, b. April 10, 1691, married Rev. Joseph, son 
of Isaac and Deborah {Perkins^ Meacham of 
Coventry, (^onn. ; 
lY. Stephen*, b. May 14, 1693, married Abigail, daugh- 
ter of Rev. John and Martha [(^Gould) Selleck] 
Davenport of Stamford, Conn. He married 2d, 
Sarah, daughter of David and Sarah (Stebbins) 
Chapin of Chicopee, Mass., and widow of Na- 
thaniel, son of Natljaniel and Mary (^Ferry) Burt 
of Longmeadow, Mass. ; minister at Longmeadow ; 
V. Eliakim*, b. May 1, 1695, died April 15, 1696 ; 
VI. Eunice*, b. September 16, 1696, married and re- 
mained among the Indians at Caughnawaga, 
Canada ; 
VII. John*, b. January 19, 1698 ; killed by Indians Feb- 
ruary 29, 1704; 
VIII. Warham*, b. September 16, 1699, married Abigail, 
daughter of George and Anna {Tisdah) Leonard 
of Norton, Mass. ; minister at Waltham, Mass. ; 
IX. Jeruslia*, b. Sept. 8, 1701, died September 11, 1701 ; 
X. Jemima*, b. January 15, 1704 ; killed by Indians 
February 29, 1704. 

Children by second wife : 

I. Abigail*, b. September 27, 1708 ; married first, Ebe- 
nezer, adopted son of Mahuman and Mary Hins- 
dale, of Hinsdale, N. H. ; second. Col. Benjamin 
Hall of Wallingford, Conn. ; tliird, Col. Ebene- 
zer, son of Robert and Sarah {Hull) Silliman of 
Fairfield, Conn.; 



78 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

II. JolmS b. November 23, 1709, died June 9, 1714 ; 

III. EliakimS b. Feb. 6, 1711, died infant; 

IV. Elijah*, b. November 13, 1712 ; married Lydia, dau. 

of Capt. Henry and Lydia {Hawley^ D wight of 
Hatfield ; second, Margaret, daughter of Col. 
William and Catharine (^Breiver') Pyncheon ; 
V. Sarah^ b. September 28, 1716, died unmarried at 
Waltham, February 19, 1736. 

19. Ebenezer^ Williams {Samuel'^, Robert^). Stoning- 
ton ; married January 24, 1687, Mary, daughter of Isaac and 
Martha {Parke) Wheeler of Stoninoton, Conn., born Novem- 
ber 22, 1669, died Jan. 3, 1709 ; second, July 12, 1711, Sarah, 
daughter of Nathaniel and Mary (^French) Hammond of 
Newton, born August 3, 1675 ; d. September 5, 1751; (W. 
F., February 13, 1747, (R. A, W.) ; he died Feb. 13, 1747. 

Children by first marriage : 

I. Theoda*, b. October 29, 1687, died Jan. 19, 1694 ; 

II. Unnamed child*, b. September 17, died 20, 1691 ; 

III. Mary*, b. January 7, 1694, died January 8, 1704; 

IV. Samuel*, b. February 3, 1696, married Jemima, dau. 

of Thomas and Mary (^Hinsdale) Sheldon of 
Northampton, Mass. ; second, Mary* Williams 
[JEleazer^, Isaae^, B-ohert'^) ; 
V. Ebenezer*, baptized June 25, 1699, d. infant; 
VI. Theoda*, b. January 3, 1701, died unmarried; 
VH. Silence*, b. December 8, 1703, married Oliver, son 
of Josiah Grant ; 
VIII. Ebenezer*, b. October 21,1705, married twice ; no 
children ; 
IX. Elizabeth*, b. October 21, 1705 (twin), married Jon- 
athan Smith ; 
X. Martha*, b. April 3, 1708, married Jeremiah Smith ; 

Children by second marriage : 

I. Unnamed son*, b. June 10 ; died 19, 1713 ; 
II. Unnamed son*, b. May 12 ; died June 13, 1714 ; 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 79 

III. Nathaniel*, b. July 24, 1715, married Amy, daugh- 

ter of Major Israel and Anna (^Breed) Hewitt of 
Stonington ; second, Abigail Eldredge of the 
same ; 

IV. Elisha^ b. January 12, 1719, married Thankful, 

daughter of Joseph and Prudence (Minor) Deni- 
son ; second, Eunice Williams (Nehemiah^^ Elea- 
zer^^ Isaac^, Rohf^rt^) ; third, Esther, daughter of 
Jonathan and Esther (Denison) Wheeler, of 
Stonington ; fourth, tlie widow Eunice Baldwin. 

20. Deboeah^ Williaisis (Samuel'^, Robert^).. Married 
Joseph, son of Peter and Sarah (Tucker^ Warren of Boston ; 

settled at Roxbury. He was born Feb. 19, 1C63 ; died July 
13, 1729. She died October 6, 1743. Children : 

I. Samuel"*, b. August 13, 1694, died in a few days ; 
\[. Joseph^ b. Febinary 2, lu96, married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Samuel and Mary ( Calef) Stevens of 
Roxbury, and was the father of Gen. Joseph 
Warren of Bunker Hill fame, Dr. John Warren 
of Boston, and others ; 

III. Ebenezer'*, b. January 26, 1699 ; 

IV. Sarah^.'b. July 27, 1702; 

V. JohnS b. September 18, 1704 ; 
VI. Hannah^ b. March 31, 1707. 

21. Martha^ Wflliams (SamueP, Robert). Married 
Jonathan, son of Jonathan and Clemence (Hosmer) Hunt of 
Northampton, Mass., b. June 20, 1666, died July 1, 1738. 
She died March 21, 1751. Children : 

I. Theoda'*, b. November 22, 1694, died unmarried ; 
II. Jonathan"*, b. April 24, 1697, married Thankful, 
daughter of Jerijah and Thankful {Stebbins) 
Strong of Northampton ; 
HI. Martha* b. April 18, 1699, married Rev. Thomas, 
son of David and Sarah (Btssell) White of Bol- 
ton, Conn. ; second. Col. Thomas, son of Samuel 
and Ruth (Rice) Welles of Glastonbury, Conn; 



80 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

IV. Elizabeth*, b. March 2, 1701, married Ebenezer, son 
of Ebenezer and Sarah Pomeroy of Northfield,' 
Conn. ; 
V. Samnel^ b. 1703, married Anna, daughter of John 
and Esther ( White) Ellsworth of Windsor, Conn. 

VI. Mary"*, b. November 14, 1705, married Col. Seth, son 
of Ebenezer and Sarah Pomeroy of Northfield, 
Conn., who was made senior Major General at the 
beginning of the Revolution, but resigned on ac- 
count of the ill-feeling caused ; 
VII. Joseph*, b. July 12, 1708, married Rachel, daughter 

of Henry Wolcott of Northampton, Mass. ; 
Vlir. John*, b. August 31, 1712, married Esther Wells of 
Northampton. 

22. Abigail^ Williams QSamuel'^, Robert^'). Married 
May 26, 1698, Experience, son of Samuel and Hannah 
(^Stanley) Porter of Hadley, Mass , b. August 5, 1676, died 
at Mansfield, Ct., where they removed after the births of all 
their children, August 28, 1750. She died April 20, 1765. 
Children born at Hadley : 

I. Theoda*, b. August 15, 1699, married Amos, son of 
Henry and Anna {Ames') Wallbridge of Norwich, 
Conn. ; 
II. Hannah*, b. March 25, 1701, married William, son of 
Daniel and Hannah [(X^'z^zs) Crow] Marsh of 
Hadley, Mass. ; second. Major Joseph, son of 
Samuel, Jr., and Martha {Burge) Storrs of Mans- 
field, Conn. ; 

in. Experience*, b. December 15, 1702 ; married Abigail 
S afford ; 

IV. John*, b. Dec. 27, 1704, married Abigail, daugh- 
ter of John and Elizabeth (Cross) Arnold of 
Mansfield, Conn. : 
V. Abigail*, b. March 19, 1707, married Nehemiah Es- 
tabrook ; 

VI. Nathaniel*, b. August 26, 1709, married Elizabeth, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 81 

daughter of Samuel and Mary {Huchins) Storrs 
of Mansfield, Conn. ; 
VII. MarthaS b. January 11, died February 18, 1712 ; 
VIII. Eunice*, b. December 30, 1712, married Huckins, 
son of Samuel, Jr., and Martha {Burge) Storrs of 
Mansfield ; 
IX. Mehitable^ b. July 30, 1715, married Thomas, son of 
Robert and Bethia {Ford) Barrows of Plymouth, 
Mass., and Mansfield, Conn. ; 
X. Martha*, b. November 21, 1717, married Cornelius, 
son of Thomas and Mehitable Storrs of IVIaiis- 
field. 

23. Parke^ Williams {Samuel'^, Robert^). Married 
1698, Priscilla, daughter of John and Bathsheba Payson of 
Dorchester, Mass., b. July 28, 1674, died at Lebanon, Conn., 
April 5, 1746. He died there October 81, 1757. After the 
birth of his children at Roxbury, he removed to Lebanon, 
Conn. Mr. A. H. Wright has shown that Ebenezer*, placed 
as a son of Parke^ in the "Williams Familj^," was a son of 
Isaac^ (Isaac^, Robert^'). How the error came to be intro- 
duced into the first printed record is unknown, as the MSS. 
notes of Mrs. Pitkin give Parke^ ^^^ly t^'^s children who here 
follow : 

I. Samuel^ b. July 29, 1699, married Deborah Throop ; 
II. Bathsheba^ b. August 28, 1701 ; 
HI. Jolm^ b. June 6, 1706, of Sharon, Conn.; 

24. IsAAC^ Williams {haac\ Robert^')., Of Newton 
till 1734, then at Roxbury, married 1685, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Jonathan and Mary (^French') Hyde of Newton, b. 
September 4, 1659, died June 26, 1699 ; married 2d, 1709, 
Mary, widow of Nathaniel Hammond, who is said by Bond to 
have been the sister of his first wife. He married third, 
Hannah , and died June 27, 1739. Children: 

I. Isaac*, b. November 1, 1686, married Martha, daugh- 
ter of Joshua and Abigail (Tarbell) Whitney of 
Watertown ; 



82 MAGAZrNE OF KEW ENGLAND HISTORY. - 

II. Jonathan*, b. November 5, 1687, not named in bis 
father's will, and probably, as Jackson says, dead 
before that time ; 

III. Mary^ b. (there is something wrong about the date 

of the birth of this child. Jackson gives Febru- 
ary 27, 1688, and the compiler of the Williams 
Family is equally wrong with Feb. 27, 1680 \ m. 
November 25, 1713, Benjamin, son of John and 
Hannah Payson of Roxbury ; 

IV. John*, b. April 30, 1689, m. Mary, daughter of Jo- 

seph and Ann (^Chaplin) Goad of Roxbury ; 

V. William*, b. September 19, 1690, remained at New- 
ton and married there Experience, daughter of 
Joseph and Deliverance {Jackson) Wilson, of 
Newton. In 1728 went to Watertown; in 1738 
to Mansfield, Conn. Two of the sons went into 
Vermont when that State was first opened. The 
compiler is descended from the seventh child ; 

VI. Ebenezer*, b. October 16, 1691, married Mary, dau. 
of Andrew and Elizabeth Vetch of Lebanon-Gosh- 
en, Conn. The descendants of this marriage 
have been fully given in the work of A. S. 
Wright, Esq. ; 
VII. Samuel*, b. February 11, 1693, married Abigail, 
daughter of William and Leah {Fisher) Godard 
of Sherborn, Mass. ; married 2d, Abigail, daugh- 
ter of Eleazer and Dorothy (^Badcock) Wood of 
Natick, and granddaughter of Nicholas and Mary 
( Williams') Wood of the same ; 
VIII. Martha*, b. September 12, 1694, married Jacob Pay- 
son of Roxbury ; 

IX. Daniel*, b. October 22, 1695 (Jackson) 1696 (Wil- 
liams Family), married Hannah, daughter of 
John and Mary (^Chelny) Holbrook of Roxbury; 
X. Elizabeth*, b. September 23, 1697, d. unmarried. 

25. Maetha^ Williams {Isaat^, Robert^). Married 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 83 

John, son of Peter and Elizabeth (^Smith) Hunt of Reho-- 
both, and brother of the second wife of her father, b. October 
15, 1656; died October 21, 1716; lived at Rehoboth, where 
she died October 2, 1701. Children: 

I. Peter^ b. February 27, 1683, married Abijath Bo wen ; 

married 2d, Anna, daughter of Samuel and Abi- 
gail {F/issell) Paine of Woodstock, Conn; 

II. Mercy*, b. January 10, 1687, d. unmarried ; 

III. Deborah^ b. May 27, 1692, m. Joseph Barber ; 

IV. Judiths b. April 14, 1695, died before 1703 ; 

V. Hannah*, b. June 19, 1697, married Henry Healy ; 
Vr. Ephraim*, b. August 23, 1700, marled Sarah, dau. 
of Jathniel and Sarah (^Smith) Peck of Reho- 
both ; married 2d, Rachel Nichols. 

26. William^ Williams (Isaac^, RoaerO-). Mhiister at 
Hatfield, Mass., married July 8, 1686, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Rev. Seaborn and Dorothy (Bradttreet) Cotton of Hamp- 
ton, N. H., born August 13, 1665, died May 7, 1698 ; married 
2d, August 9, 1699, Christian, daughter of Rev. Solomon 
and Esther [( TFrt?'Aam) Mather] Stoddard of Northampton, 
Mass., b. Aug. 23, 1676, died April 23, 1764. He died Aug. 
31,1741. Children: 

I. Williams b. April 30, d. May 5, 1687 ; 

II. William*, b. May 11, 1688, married Hannali, daugh- 

ter of Solomon and Esther [{Warham) Mather] 
Stoddard, and sister of his father's second wife ; 
married 2d, Sarah, widow of Rev. James Stone of 
Newton-Holliston ; 

III. Martha*, b. October 8, 1690, married Edward, son of 

Samuel and Mehitable ( Crow) Partridge of Hat- 
field-Hadley; 

IV. John*, b. March 7, 1697, died July 29, 1697. 

Children by second wife : 

I. Solomon*, b. January 4, 1701, married Mary, daugli- 
ter of Hon. Samuel and Joanna {Cook') Porter of 
Hadley, Mass. ; 



84 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

II. ElizabetlA b. June 7, 1707, m. (3d wife) Samuel,son 

of Joseph and Samh (Strong) Barnard of Salem, 

Mass. ; 

TIL Is^ael^ b. November 30, 1709, married Sarab, daugh- 
ter of Col. John and Hannah (Talcott) Chester 
of Wethersfield, Conn. ; 

IV. Dorothy*, b. June 20, 1713, married Jonathan, Jr., 
son of Jonathan and Abigail {Stehhlns) iVshley 
of Deerfield, Mass. ^ 

27. John3 Williams {Isotac^, Robert^). Stonington, 
Conn. ; married, January 21, 1688, Martha, daughter of 
Isaac and Martha {Parke) Wheeler of Stonington, b. Feb- 
ruary 6, 1670, died December 17, 1745. He died November 
15, 1702. Children : 

I. Isaac^ b. April 10, 1689, married Sarah, daughter of 

John and Phebe {Lay) Denison of Stonington ; 
II. John*, b. Oct. 31, 1692, married Desire, daughter of 
George, Jr. and Mercy {Grorham) Denison of 
Stonington ; married 2d, Mary, widow of Christo- 
pher Helme of Kingston, R. I.; married 3d, Pa- 
tience ; 

III. Martha* b. August 3, 1693 ; 

IV. Deborah*, b. April 2, 1695, married Nehemiah* Wil- 

liams {Eleazer^^ Isaac^^ Robert^) ; 
V. William*, b. March 29, 1697 ; 
VI. Nathan*, b. December 11, 1698 ; 
VII. Benajah*, b. August 28, 1700; 
VIII. Eunice*, baptized August 16, 1702. 

28. Eleazer^ Williams {Isaac'^, Robert^). Newton- 
Lebanon-Stonington ; married Mary, daughter of Jonathan 
and Mary {Rediaf) Hyde of Newton, Mass. (Sup. Ct. Rec. 
Vol. 1700-1714, p. 294, year 1713), b. unknown, though she 
must have been the first child of this second marriage, as the 
following children came so closely together that she could 
not have been a subsequent child and yet have been old 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 85 

enough to have married and had children in 1696 ; she died 
at Stonington in 1762, said to have been 89 years of age ; he 
died in 1725. April 12 and May 19 are each given as the 
date. Children: 

I. Nehemiah^ b. February 4, 1696, married Deborah* 
Williams (Johyi^^ Isaac^^ Robert^) ; 
II. Martha^ b. March 11, 1700, died 1703 ; 

III. Mary*, b. January 28, 1704 ; m. 2d wife, Samuel* 

Williams (Ehenezer^, SaonueP^ Robert^') ; 

IV. Priscilla*, married David Lester (from Hon. R. A. 

Wheeler). 

29. Elizabeth^ Williams (Isaac"^, Robert^). Newton, 
Mass., Canterbury, Conn. ; married January 3, 1700, Jon- 
athan, son of Job and Elizabeth (Fuller) Hyde of Newton, 
b. May 2, 1684. She died 1743. Children T 

I. Isaac*, b. November 11, 1700, m. Elizabeth, daughter 
of Comfort and Mary [Stone) Starr of Dedham, 
IMass. ; 
II. Jonathan*, b. 1703, married widow Abigail Hyde ; 
HI. Enocli*, 1). November 14, 1704 ; 
IV. John*, b. October 24, 1706 ; 
V. Ephraim*, b. August 3, 1707 ; 
Aa. Nathaniel*, b. November 29, 1708 ; 
VII. Elizabeth*, I). November 6, 1711 ; 
VI H. Ebenezer*, h. at Canterbur3^ 

30. Sarah'^ Williams (^Ima<P; Rtbert^). Hatfield-Had- 
ley, married October 9, 1718, John, son of Daniel and. Han- 
nah \^{Lewi») Crow] Marsh of Hatfiekl, b. March 9, 1679, d. 
September 2, 1725 ; married second, July 28, 1732, James 
Grey of Hadley. She died June 1, 1759. By 1st marriage : 

I. Martha* Marsh, b. 1719, married Moses, son of Jona- 
than and Sarab (^Parsons) Graves of Hatfield ; 

II. Anne* Marsh, b. , married Elisha, son of Icha- 

bod and Mary (Beldlng) Allis of Hatfield; 

III. John* Marsh, b. 1723, died July 3, 1726 ; 

IV, Judith* Marsh, b. February, 1725, d. Nov. 1, 1726, 



86 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

By her second marriage : 

1. James^ Grey, b. September 24, 1733 (Boltwood 
gives 1753, which must have been a typographi- 
cal error) ; 
IT. John* Grey. 

31. Mary^ Williams {Isaac\ Robert^). Newton, Mass.; 
married Joseph, son of Jonathan and Mary (French) Hyde of 
Newton, b. May 27, 1672, d. April 24, 1759. She died Mch. 
31, 1749. Children : 

I. Esther*, b. April 24, 1707, m, Jonas Livermore of 

Watertown ; 
II. Amos*, b. Nov. 16, 1714; 

III. Joseph*, b.-Nov. 16, 1714 (twin) married Susannah, 

daughter of Daniel and Mary ( Cooledge) Liver- 
more of Watertown ; 

IV. Ichabod*, b. August 24, 1717, m. Mary Hoskins ; 
V. Eunice*, b. May 26, 1720, married Thaddeus Bond 

of Needham ; 
VI. Hannah*, b. April 21, 1724, married Jonathan, Jr., 
son of Jonathan and Experience Dyke of Newton. 

32. Ephraim^ Williams (haac^^ Robert^). Newton- 
Stockbridge, Mass.; married April 1, 1714, Elizabeth, dau. 
of Abraham and Elizabeth (Blscoe') Jackson of Newton, b. 
August 8, 1680, d. April 12, 1718 ; married second. May 21, 
1719, Abigail, daughter of Capt. Josiah and Abigail 
(Barnes) Jones of Watertown, b. September 14, 1694. He 
died at Deerfield, Mass., August 1754. All his children, 
born at Newton. By first marriage : 

I. Ephraim*b. February 23, 1715 ; killed in battle near 
Lake George, N. Y., September 8, 1755. His 
estate went to found Williams College ; 

II. Thomas*, b. April 1, 1718, m. Anna, daughter of 

Timothy and Hannah (^Sheldon) Childs of Deer- 
field ; m. second, Esther^ Williams ( William^^ 
William^, Isaac% Robert^) ; 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY 87 

By second marriage : 

I. Abigail'*, b. April 20, 1721, m. Rev. Juhn, son of 

Jonathan and Mary Sergeant of Newark, N. J. ; 
m. 2d, Gen. Josiah, son of Capt. Henry and Lydia 
{Hawley^ Dwight of Great Barrington, Mass. 

II. Josiah^ b. April 17, 1723, married Hannah Sergeant 

of Newark, N. J. ; 

III. Elizabeth*, b. July 2d, 1725, d. 1729; 

IV. Judith*, b. July 18, 1728, m. Rev. Ezra Thayer of 

Ware ; 

V. Elizabeth*, b. Nov. 18, 1730, m. Rev. Stephen, son of 

Judge Zebulon and Mary {Delano') West of 
Stockbridge. No children ; 

VI. Elijah*, b. Nov. 15, 1732, m. Sophia^, daughter of 

Oliver^ and Anna'^ ( Williams- Willi am^^ William^, 
Isaac^, Robert^) Partridge of Hatfield-Stockbridge. 
Oliver'^ Partridge was son of Edward and Mar- 
tha* ( Williams- William^^ Isaac^^ Robert^) Partridge 
of Hatfield ; 
VH. Enoch*, b. March 3, 1735 ; d. 1738. 

33. Saraei^ Willfams {Stephen^, Robert^). Roxbury, 
Cambridge; married Robert, son of John Sharp of Roxbury, 
bapt. July 23, 1666, married 2d, Thomas Nowell of "Boston, 
or near there" (Trask), d. al)out 1694, married 3d, Solomon, 
3d son of Solomon, Jr. and Mary {Danforth) Phi[)ps of Cam- 
bridge, b. Jaiuiary 10, 1674, she d. Apiil 22, 1707. Children 
by first marriage: 

I. Robert* Sharp, bapt. Dccendjcr 19, 1687; 
H. Sarah* Sharp, b. August 12, 1689, married Jonathan, 
son of Walter and Sarah (^Meane) Hastings of 
Cambridge; 
Children by third^marriage : 

I. Samuel* Phipps, married Eleanor Gardiner of Rox-_ 
bury; 

II. Elizabeth* Phipps, married Jolni Abbott; 

III. Sarah* Phipps. 



88 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

34. Mary^ Williams {Stephen^ Robert^). Ipswich; mar- 
ried November 28, 1688, Samuel, son of John and Ann 
Choate of Ipswich; married 2d, September 16, 1716, Samuel 
Story of the same. Children all by the first marriage: 

I. Mary*, b. December 31, 1690; 
II. Samuels b. January 10, 1692; 

III. Sarah*; 

IV. Stephen*; 
V. William*; 

VI. Elizabeth*; 
VII. Margaret*, married Benjamin, son of Benjamin and 

Abigail (^Harris) Crafts of Roxbury; 
VIII. John*. 

85. Elizabeth^ Williams (xS'iepAf'^^ /^o^grfi). Roxbury; 
married Benjamin, son of Benjamin and Ann (^Payson) Tuck- 
.er of Roxbury, b. March 8, 1670, d. October 8, 1728; she d. 
September 11, 1740; children all born at Roxbury, but the 
parents may liave died at Leicester, as the father was on the 
list of original proprietors of that place, though nothing has 
as yet been found to show that he was there; but some of his 
children settled there in his right. Children : 

I. Sarah*, b. November 2, 1696, married John, son of 
John and Hannah (^Portise) Weld of Roxbury; 

II. Ann*, b. January 7, 1699; 

III. Elizabeth*, b. June 30, 1701, married Daniel, son of 

Joseph and Sarah (^Faxon) Weld of Roxbury; 

IV. Benjamin*, b, March 5, 1704, married Mary, daugh- 

ter of Daniel and Rebecca ( Garfield) Warren of 
Watertown; 
V. Stephen*, b. September 23, 1706, married Hannah 

Parkes; 
VI. Henry*, b. March 3, 1709; 
VII. Katharine*, b. May 11, 1711, married Thomas Ran- 
dall of Dorchester; 
VIII. Samuel*, b. July 15, 1716, married Hannah, daugh- 
ter of Peter and Sarah Silvester. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 89 

36. Bethia^ Williams (Stephen^, Robert^). Sudbury; u^ 
married May 17, 1698, Eleazer, only child of Benjamin and 
Mary {Brown) Rice of Sudbury, Mass., b. May 1, 1671, d. 
June 21, 1724, she d. July 6, 1721. Children : 

I. Mary*, b. 1699, married Henry, son of John and 

Grace {Rice) Lokerof Sudbury; 
II. Sarah*, b. 1701; 

III. Bethia*, b. June 2, 1708; 

IV. Elizabeth*, b. September 8, 1705; 
V. Katharine*, b. August 12, 1707; 

VI. Ebenezer*, b. November 24, 1709, married Anna, 
daughter of Charles and Rachel ( Wheeler) Rice; 
VII. Grace*, b. January 23, 1712, mariied Charles John- 
son of Southboro; 
VIII. Abigail*, b. June 17, 1714, married Daniel, son of 
EdAvard and Abigail (Hall) Bugbee of Roxbury; 
IX. Ann*, b. January 26, 1717. 

37. Stephen^ Williams (Stephen'^, Robert^). Roxbury; 
married June 18, 1700, Mary, daughter of Samuel and Susan- 
nah {Payson) Capen of Dorchester, Mass., b. September 23, 
1679, d. before 1739, as he married 2d, February 14, 1738, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. John and Elizabeth (MwoODan- 
forth of Dorchester, b. January 12, 1693; she was widow of 
Capt. William Lowder of Dorchester; he d. May 18, 1768. 
Children : 

I. Stephen*, b. March 9, 1702, married Sarah Payson 

of Roxbury; 
II. Samuel*, b. October 19, 1708, probably married at 

Dorchester Sarah Searles and d. at Pomfret, Ct; 

III. Susannah*, b. October 13, 1706, married John, son of 

John and Mary Robinson of Dorchester; 

IV. Edward*, b. March 26, 1709, he may have married at 

Dorchester Sarah Trott ''Tertia vel natu minima" 
(Dorch. Rec); 
V, Henry*, b, January 24, 1711, married Mary^ daugh- 



90 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

ter of Benjamin and Mary^ ( Williams-Isaac^ 
Isaaa^^ Robert^') Payson of Roxbury ; 
VI. Catharine^ b. April 12, 1714, married Capt. John, 
3d, son of John, jr., and Sarah {Tilden} Ruggles 
of Milton, Mass.; 
YII. Mary^, b. April 14, 1719, married Benjamin, son of 
John and Prudence (^Bridge') May of Roxbury. 

38. Joseph^ Williams (^Stephe'n?, Robert^). Roxbury; 
married May 22, 1706, Abigail, daughter of John and Mary 
(^Torrey) Davis of Roxbury, b. Februaiy 13, 1687, d. Decem- 
ber 23, 1771; he d. August 17, 1720 and she married 2d, Jan- 
uary 11, 1733, Edward, son of John and Martha (^Devotion) 
Ruggles of Roxbury. Children : 

I. Joseph*, b. April 10, 1708, married Martha, daughter 
of Henry and Martha (Deming) Howells of Bos- 
ton, Mass.; married 2d, Hannah ( Whiting)^ widow 
of Thomas Dudley of 'Roxbury; 
II. Mary*, b. July 14, 1710, married Samuel, son of John 
and Sarah ( Gardner) Gore of Roxbury; 

III. John*, b. September 17, 1712, married Elizabeth'^ 

Williams {John'^^ SaynueP^ SamueP, Robert^) ^ mar- 
ried 2d, Bethia (^Parker)^ widow of Caleb Sted- 
man, jr., of Roxbury; 

IV. Sarah*, b. September 27, 1714, she may have married 

Ebenezer Scott of Milton, Mass.; 
V. Stephen*, b. October 27, 1716, d. August 21, 1720; 
VI. Jeremiah*, b. October 5, 1718, married Catharine, 

daughter of Edward and Catharine {Scarborough) 

Payson*, of Roxbury. 
VII. Abiel*, b. October 17, 1720, married Timothy, son of 

Edward and Jemima Foster of Dorchester, Mass. 

39. JoHN^ Williams {^Stepheri^, Robert^). Roxbury 
married March 15, 1716, Dorothy, daughter of Nathaniel and 
Margaret {Weld) Brewer of Roxbury, b. June 19, 1697, 
Children ; 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 91 

I. Nathaniel, b. August 16, 1717, wife's name probably 
Jane; 

II. John^, b. December 27, 1719, married Anna, daugh- 

ter of Thomas and Mary {Clap) Bird of Dorches- 
ter; 

III. Dorothy^, b. January 14, 1721, married Capt. Ralph, 

son of John and Mary (^Cheiny) Holbrook of 
R ox bury; 

IV. Margaret*, b. February 19, 1723, married Thomas 

Griggs, probably son of Ichabod and Margaret 
Griggs of Roxbury. 

40. Grace^ Williams (Stephen^, Robert^). Dedham; 
married 3d wife, December 29, 1718, Dea. John, son of Jon- 
athan and Hannah (Keiirick) Metcalf of Dedham, b. March 
20, 1678, d. October 6, 1749; shed. November 11, 1749. 
Children : 

I. Katharine^ b. August 12, 1719, d. infant; 
II. Katharine^ b. June 27, 1721, d. June 12, 1746. 

III. Mehitable*, b. September 18. 1723, married Jona- 

than, son of Josiah and Elizabeth (^Avery) Fisher 
of Dedham ; 

IV. SaraliS b. June 19, 1725, d. September 3, 1749; 

V. Stephen*, bapt. March 15, 1726, "at ye house ye life 

of ye child not being expected", d. infant; 
VI. Timothy*, b. December 2, bapt. in private, December 
8, d. December 12, 1728; 
VII. Timothy*, b. Jn\y 14, 1730, married Hannah, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Hannah ( Curtis) Guild of Ded- 
ham; 
VIII. Grace*, b. November 12, 1731, d. August 13, 1749; 
IX. Stephen*, b. March 10, 1733; 
X. Unnamed son*, 1735. 



92 MAGvVZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Rev. James Hillhouse of New London 

AND HIS FAMILY. 



CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY A. BAKER, ESQ. 




EV. JAMES HILLHOUSEi came to New England 
early in the last century. His father, John Hillhouse, 
of Free Hall, was the eldest son of Abraham Hill- 
house, who resided at Artikelly. His uncle, James 
Hillhouse, was one of the commissioners to treat with Lord 
Mount joy, in the memorable defense of Derby, against the 
forces of King James JI, and was Mayor of Londonderry in 
1693. This Abraham Hillhouse was among the signers of 
an address to King William and Queen Mary on the occasion 
of the relief of the siege of Londonderry, dated 29th July, 
1669. 

Rev. James Hillhouse was educated at the famous Univer- 
sity of Glasgow in Scotland, and afterwards read divinity at 
the same college, under the care of Kev. Mr. Simson, then 
Professor of Divinity there. He was ordained by the Pres- 
bytery of Londonderry in Ireland, and appears to have re- 
sided at or near the ancestral home until the death of his 
father in 1716. The estate descended to his elder brother, 
Abraham. His mother died a few months later, in Januarv 
of the following year. Not long after that date he came to 
seek a home on this side of the Atlantic. He is supposed to 
have come with other Presbyterian emigrants from the north 
of Ireland, who in 1719 established themselves in New 
Hampshire, where the towns of Derby and Londonderry and 
the Londonderry Presbytery are the permanent memorials of 
that migration, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 93 

At the close of the year 1720, Rev. Mr. Hillhouse appears 
at Boston, committing to the press a sermon which he had 
written a few years before on the occasion of his mother's 
death, but does not appear to have been preached. This 
work, though entitled ''a sermon," was more properly a 
treatise in a volume of more than one hundred and forty 
pages. Cotton Mather speaks of its author as "a valuable 
minister," and "a worthy, hopeful young minister lately ar- 
rived in America." 

At a parish meeting of tlie North Parish of New London, 
(now Montville), held on the otli day of February, 1721-2, it 
was voted "that Mr. Joseph Bradford be a committee to go 
to the Governor, Mr. Saltonstall, and request him to write to 
Rev. James Hillhouse to ascei'tain it he could be obtained as 
pastor of the church." 

The official acts on the part of Mr. Bradford were speedily 
performed, and the Governor's request accepted. 

On the 3d day of October, 1722, Rev. Mr. Hillhouse was 
duly installed pastor of tlie church in tlie North Parish of 
New London. 

The same year in which a call was extended to Rev. Mr. 
Hillhouse to become tlieir pastor, the inhabitants of the Nortli 
Parish petitioned the court for certain privileges to encourage 
them in settling a minister. The court, for the encourage- 
ment of settling a minister and building a meeting house, 
then granted them freedom from country taxes for the space 
of four years, and five hundred acres of land to be laid out 
for the use of the ministry. Two hundred and fifty acres of 
the land granted by the court was at once conveyed by deed 
to Rev. James Hillhouse. On this land Rev. Mr. Hillhouse 
erected a dwelling house, which was occupied by some of the 
family for three generations. 

Rev. James Hillhouse was born about 1687, and was mar- 
ried on tlie 18th day of January, 1726, to Mary, daughter of 
Daniel Fitch, one of his parishioners. She was a grand- 
daughter of the Rev. James Fitch, the first minister at Nor- 
wich, Conn. Mr. Hillhouse continued pastor of the church 



9-i MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

over which he was installed about sixteen years, and the 
fruits of his hibor still remain. He was a man of great sa- 
gacity and lield strongly for his rights. He died young in 
the ministry, and his early death was probably hastened by 
the care and perplexity attending his troubles and lawsuits 
brought upon him by a lack of due deliberation and hasty 
action on the part of a portion of the members of his church. 
He died 15th of December, 1740, and was buried in the rear 
of the church, which stood on ''Raymond Hill." His wife 
survived him, and was afterwards twice married. She died 
the 25th day of October, 1768, aged sixty-two years. 

Esquire John Hillhottse^, the eldest son, was born 
14th December 1726, and died 9th April, 1735. 

William Hillhouse^, the second son, born 17th August, 
1728, married 1st November, 1750, Sarah Griswold, daughter 
of John Griswold and sister of the first Governor Griswold 
of Connecticut. He settled on the paternal estate in Mont- 
ville, and continued his residence there until his death. He 
Avas greatly trusted and honored by his fellow citizens. He 
was one of the most prominent men in his native town, and 
a leading patriot in the Revolution. At the age of twenty- 
seven he represented his town in the Legislature of His Maj- 
esty's Colony of Connecticut, and was, by semi-annual elec- 
tions, continued in that trust, till having become honorably 
known and esteemed throughout the State, he was chosen in 
1785 an assistant in the upper House. He was also for many 
years a Judge of the County and Probate Court. He was 
also a Major in the second regiment of Cavalry, raised by the 
State for service in the war of the Revolution. At the age 
of eighty, then in the full possession of his powers, he de- 
clined a re-election to the council and withdrew from public 
life. His journeys to Hartford and New Haven, and other 
places of business, were always performed on horseback. 
He was tall, spare, swathy, with heavy, overhanging eye- 
brows, quaint in speech, and remarkable for a simplicity of 
manners, combined with an impressive dignity. His wife 
died 10th March, 1777. He afterwards married Delia Hos- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 95 

mer, 24th May, 1778, and diedl2tli June, 1816. Judge Wil- 
liam Hillhouse by his first Avife, Sarah Griswold, had ten 
children. 

James Abraham Hillhouse^ third son of Rev. James 
Hillhouse, married a lady of French descent, whose grand- 
father fled to this country at the revocation of Nantz. She 
survived her husband and died in 1822 at the age of 89 
years. Mr. Hillhouse was educated at Yale College, where 
he graduated in 1749, and was appointed tutor one year af- 
terwards. He entered the profession of law about 1756 at 
New Haven, and was soon distinguished at the bar by his 
forensic abilities, as well as by his learning. In 1772 he was 
elected one of the twelve assistants, who, with the Governor 
and Lieutenant Governor, were the Council, or Senate. 
Three years afterward, at the noon of life, being only fort}'- 
six years of age, he was removed by death, leaving a name 
long held in remembrance among his townsmen. His Chris- 
tian life and conversation were truly exemplary, adorned 
with the graces of meekness, charity and humaness. He 
died childless, and his spacious mansion and its beautiful sur- 
roundings in New Haven, and growing possessions, were 
without a lineal heir. 

James Hillhouse^ the second son of Judge William 
Hillhouse^ was born Oct. 20, 1754, and married Jan. 1, 1779, 
Sarah Lloyd, daughter of James Lloyd of Boston. She died 
about one year after. He then, on tlie 10th day of October, 
1782, was again married to Jiebecca Woolsey. He was, 
while in youth, adopted by his uncle, James Abraliam Hill- 
house, of New Haven, who gave him an education. He 
graduated at Yale College in 1773, and was a lawyer of a 
high reputation. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws 
there in 1823. He was Treasurer of the College fifty years, 
and the first appointed Commissioner of the School Fund of 
Connecticut, which he held for two years from 1789 to 1791. 
He was elected a representative to Congress in 1791, and 
was afterwards sixteen years a member of the United States 
Senate. He died Dec. 29th, 1832, aged 78 years, surviving 



96 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

his wife nineteen years, leaving five children and six grand- 
children. 

David Hillhouse^, the third son of Judge William Hill- 
house2, born May 11 th, 1756, married Oct. 7, 1781, Sarah 
Porter, daughter of Col. Elisha Porter of Hadley, Mass. 
She was a granddaughter of Rev. David Jewett, the succes- 
sor of Rev. James Hill house. 

Mr. David Hillhouse with his family removed to the State 
of Georgia. He afterwards published a newspaper at Colum- 
bia, in South Carolina. They had six children. Their 
youngest daughter, Sarah, married Felix H. Gilbert of Geor- 
gia, and had one daughter, Sarah Hillhouse, born in 1806, 
who married April 29th, 1823, Adam L. Alexander. They 
had twelve children; a son married the daughter of Hon. 
Robert Toombs of Georgia. 

At the time Rev. James Hillhouse^ received his call to be- 
come a pastor in the North Parish of New London, a few of 
the members belonging to the First Church in New London, 
residing in the North Parish, formed themselves into a sepa- 
rate church, called the Second Churcli of New London. 

The names of the persons constituting this church were 
Thomas Avery, Robert Denison, Nathaniel Otis, Samuel 
Allen, John Vibber, Charles Campbell and Jonathan Copp. 
The last named was chosen their deacon. 

Not having any church edifice 3^et erected, their meetings 
were held in the west room of Mr. Samuel Allen's tavern. 

On the llth day of July, 1723, their meeting house was 
raised, the site of which was on high ground, a commanding 
point in the Parish. A wide and romantic landscape was 
spread around the sacred edifice. 

While the house of worship was being completed, Mr. 
Hillhouse made a brief visit to his native land, but returned 
before the close of the year. 

Mr. Hillhouse left a substantial record of faithfulness and 
zeal as a pioneer in laying the foundation and building up "a 
church in the wilderness." Between his installment in Oc- 
tober, 1722, and his death in December, 1740, he admitted to 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 97 

the church 198 new members and eighteen from other 
churches. His record of baptism comprises 180, and of mar- 
riages thirty-five. 

Many of his descendants have been persons of public no- 
toriety, holding some of the most important offices in the 
State and in the nation. 

"The memory of the just is blessed/' 
♦ » ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Dover, N. H. — Dover, N. H., is the oldest place in the 
State, having been settled on the Newicha wan nick and Bel- 
lamy rivers. The pioneer colony was composed of Episco- 
palians sent over by the Laconia Company. In 1641 Dover 
Avas annexed to Mass., and in 1679 was returned to New 
Hampshire. The people had a man to "beate the drumme 
on Lord's days to give notice of the time of meeting" until 
1665, when they built "a Terrett upon the meetting house for 
to hang a bell." In 1657 they "chose by voet a scoell- 
master." Major Walderne settled on the present site of the 
city, and built a strong garrison-house. Here, in 1676, he 
was visited by four hundred Indians, whose confidence he 
won. He arranged a sham-fight between them and the colo- 
nial soldiers. When the guns of the Indians were dis- 
charged the troops rushed in and disarmed them, after which 
two hundred were sent to Boston as prisoners. Several were 
executed on Boston Common, and the remainder were sold 
into slavery in the West Indies. Thirteen years later a 
powerful Indian force seized Dover by night, destroyed 4 
garrisons and killed many of the inhabitants. Major Wal- 
derne, then 74 years old, commander of the forces of the 
colony, was captured and put to death. The town was the 
object of other disastrous attacks during the Indian wars, 
but was never abandoned by its intrepid people. 



♦ » ♦ » ♦ 



Wages in 1638.— The Plymouth Colonists, in 1638, fixed 
the wages of a laborer at twelvepence per day and board, or 
eighteen pence without board, allowing but sixpence a day for 
board. They also provided that no sijigle person who did not 
belong to the family should reside in it without consent of the 
Governor and Council. 



98 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



THE PART BORNE BY 

Sergeant John White Paul, 



IN THE 



CAPTURE OF BRIGADIER GENERAL RICHARD PRESCOTT, 

COMMANDER OF THE BRITISH FORCES, NEAR 

NEWPORT, R. I„ IN I'j^-].'^ 



BY EDWARD J. PAUL. 




HE character of a people, so far as it is an expression 
of positive and usual traits of individuals, is largel}^ 
the result of political conditions ; and some one, en- 
^ deavoring to determine the relative values of these 
conditions, has remarked that certain qualities of American 
character, restless industry, ingenuity, firm yet audacious 
courage, and entire self-reliance — qualities essential to in- 
dustrial success — are so distinctivel}^ our own that European 
artists, accustomed to the hereditary subordination and disci- 
pline of an empire, cannot grasp the spirit that animates our 
armies. 

Certainly some of our great paintings, portraying lines of 
battle wavering with impulse, and broken by deeds of singu- 
lar devotion, are evidences that an American soldier enjoys 
a consciousness of duty and freedom of action, in harmony 
with our institutions. Yet our national growth has not been 
in defiance of any principle. Before selfish affairs of busi- 
ness had absorbed any one's interest in the common good, 
patriotism, though possibly not more generous, was more 
personal. It was rather an incentive than a sentiment, and 
the forms of its expression were so unrestricted, that all of 

*Reprinted by permission of the author, from a pamphlet issued at Milwaukee : 1887. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 99 

those exploits that make the story of the revolution sacred 
history, seem now to be both the results and proofs of the 
strength and character of native energies. 

None of these exploits was more hazardous and brilliant 
in its success, more barren of direct advantage, and yet more 
refreshing to the inexperienced continental troops, than the 
capture of Brigadier General Richard Prescott*, the com- 
mander of the British forces, near Newport, R. I., in 1777, 
by a number of men, led by Lieut. Colonel William Barton. 

Mrs. Williams' narrative of the expedition-}- , corresponding, 
substantially, with an account of it left by Barton | in his 
own handwriting, is briefly as follows : 

Colonel Barton, having learned from a Mr. Coffin, who had 
escaped through the British lines, that General Prescott was 
quartered at the house of Mr. Overing, on the west side of 
Rhode Island, about a mile from the shore, embarked from 
Tiverton, the evening of July 4, 1777, with Colonel Stanton, 
Ebenezer Adams, Captain of Artillery, Lieut. James Potter, 
Joshua Babcock, John Wilcox, and about forty men, in five 
whaleboats ; and having encountered a storm in Mount Hope 
Bay, arrived at Bristol at about nine o'clock the next eve- 
niijg. The evening of the sixth of July, with muffled oars, 
they passed over to Warwick Neck, and having been delayed 
there by northeast winds, did not re-embark until late in the 
evening of the ninth. Then, following Barton, who had 
tied his handkerchief to a pole to distinguish his own boat, 

*He is usually designated Major General, but Diman says: — "He was at the time of his 
capture, a Brigadier General; he was made a Major General August 29, 1777. He was ex- 
changed for General Charles Lee, and resumed his command on Rhode Island, after the 
exchange, continuing there until after the evacuation, in October, 1779." 

Prescott came as a subordinate of Sir Henry Clinton, who passed through Long Island 
Sound, and arrived in Narragansett Bay, in December, 1776, with two English, and two 
Hessian brigades, in seventy transports, convoyed by Sir Peter Parker, with eleven ships of 
war. In January, 1777, C-Iinton returned to England, leaving the forces in command of 
Earl Percy, who also returned in May, leaving Prescott in command of them. A large 
portion of the troops were quartered in farm-houses, on the island. 

f'Biography of Revolutionary Heroes, containing the Life of Brigadier General Wm. 
Barton, and also of Captain Stephen Olney, by Mrs. Williams." Published by the author. 
Providence. 1839. Pages 40-62, and page 126, note D. 

+An account in manuscript, entitled: "Narrative of the particulars relative to the capture 
of Major General Prescott, and his Aide-de-Camp Major Barrington," and preserved in 
the library of the Rhode Island Historical Society. 



100 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

tliey steered between the islands of Prudence and Patience, 
to avoid the enemy's shipping over against Mount Hope 
Island, and rowed under the west side of Prudence, to the 
southward, coming so near the British vessels that they 
could hear the watch cry, "All'? Well !" About three-quar- 
ters of a mile from the Island they were startled by the 
trampling of horses, yet pushing on, landed safely, and 
moored their boats in a creek, sheltered by a little bluff of 
sand. 

To the right, a brook crossing the road near the Overing 
House, descending the hill toward the left and running 
through a kind of gorge, emptied into the creek. Keeping 
in the ^ gully and under tlie ridge, the party advanced cau- 
tiously, and emerging back of Peleg Coggeshall's farm, 
gained the road. In passing to the house, they left the 
guard-house forty or fifty rods to the left. A little to the 
left of that was the Redwood House, where Gen. Smith, sec- 
ond in command, was quartered. On the right, or Newport 
side, was a building appropriated to a troop of light horse, 
and, twenty-five yards from the gate, was a sentinel. The 
occupants of the house, Mr. Overing and his son. General 
Prescott, his aide, Maj. Harrington, and the servants, were 
in deep sleep, presumably the effects of a carouse at the 
house of one Bannister, a Tory, upon the wines and Santa 
Cruz of a prize, brought into Newport the day before. 

To the sentinel's demand: "Who comes there ?" the pat- 
riots answered : "Friends ! Have you seen any deserters to- 
night ?" and approaching, apparently to give the counter- 
sign, suddenly seized and bound him, surrounded the house 
and burst open the door. Barton, calling to them to set fire 
to the house, found Prescott abed, and hurried him to the 
boats. And his resolute men, securing Major Barrington 
also, and hastily retreating, pushed off, and made their way 
with the prisoners, among the alarmed vessels of the fleet, 
through darkness illumined by rockets and flashing guns, 

safely across Narragansett bay, to the battery on Warwick 
Neck. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 101 

Since cliildliood I have been taught that my great grand- 
father's brother, John White Paul, born at Dighton, Mass., 
in 1755,* was an officer of no exalted rank in Barton's regi- 
ment, and was the second man chosen to accompany him on 
this dangerous enterprise ; that, because of his great strength 
and weight, he was one of the men selected to tlirottle the 
sentinel at Gen. Prescott's door, and, afterwards, to conduct 
the General across the fields to the boats ; and that, when 
Prescott complained that the stubble hurt his bare feet, John 
Paul was courteous enough — and there was a yeoman's irony 
in his courtesy — to offer to let the General wear his big, low 
shoes. 

The story is corroborated in many details, and especially 
in that part in which it is [)eculiar, by tlie words of a revolu- 
tionary songi one verse of which runs : 

"Then through rye stubble him tliey led, 
With shoes and breeches none," 

and ai^rees with the narratives abov^e mentioned, so closely' in 
some places, that it miglit seem to have been partly derived 
from them, liad it not been rehited thirty years before either 
of them Avas written|. Yet the story is not simply a family 
tradition, for, although cherished in the family, nothing ob- 
scure shrouds its origin, and the relation of my father, of my 
grandfather and of my great-grandfather, is not the only 
evidence of its truth. 

Desiring however, to embody an authorative statement of 



*Son of James Paul and Sarah White, his wife. James Paul was a blacksmith and 
farmer, a deacon in Elder (ioff" s I>ai)tist church at Dighton, and a descendant, in the 
fourth generation, of William Paul, born 1615, who left (iravesend, England, June 10, 1637, 
in the ship "True Love de London," Robert Dennis, master, aiid settled at Taunton, 
Mass., of which Dighton was originally a part, in 1637. 

tThis song appears in the "Manufacturers' and Farmers' Journal," of June 25, 1835, with 
a note stating that it was taken from the Plymouth Memorial. It is preserved in Rhode 
Island Historical Tracts, No. 1, page 52, and also by Mr. Lossing, in "Harper's Young 
Folks." 

jMrs. Williams' Biography was written in 1839, and Barton's account was probably not 
written long tefoi^e his death, October 22, 1831. John Paul told the story to his children, 
in Westminster, Vermont, as early as 1785, and General Barton, himself , told it to my 
grandfather Amos Paul, in Danville, about 1820, 



102 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

these facts in the genealogy of the Paul family,* I searched 
the filesf of "The Pennsylvania Evening Post," and of ''The 
Providence Gazette," for contemporaneous and particular re- 
ports of the adventure, and learned only, that those who 
shared its perils with Barton were about forty-six volunteers. 
Barton's own account leaves the impression that there were 
forty-eight. Nevertheless, eighty-three years after the event, 
Lossinof's "Field Book of the Revolution" states that there 
were forty, and that their names, as furnished by General 
Barton's son, John B. Barton, Esq., of Providence, were as 
follows : 

Officers : Andrew Stanton, Eleazer Adams, Samuel Potter, 
John Wilcox. Non-commissioned officers : Joshua Babcock, 
Samuel Phillips. Privates : Benjamin Pren, James Potter, 
Henry Fisher, James Parker, Joseph Guild, Nathan Smith, 
Isaac Brown, Billington Crumb, James Haines, Samuel Apis, 
Alderman Crank, Oliver Simmons, Jack Sherman, Joel 
Briggs, Clark Packard, Samuel Cory, James Weaver, Clark 
(Jrandall, Sampson George, Joseph Ralph, Jedediah Gre- 
nale, Richard Hare, Darius Wale, Joseph Denis, William 
Bruff, Charles Hassett, Thomas Wilcox, Pardon Cory, Jere- 
miah Thomas, John Hunt, Thomas Austin, Daniel Page (a 
Narragansett Indian), Jack Sisson (black), and Howe, or 
Whiting, boatsteerer. 

From this list John Paul is not only omitted, but excluded, 
apparently, by the implication of a note, which adds : "In 
Allen's American Biography the name of the black man is 

*The Genealogy of the Paul Family, descendants of William Paul, born 1615, one of the 
original proprietors of "Taunton south purchase," etc., is now nearly completed in manu- 
script, and, I hope, will be shortly ready for the press. Incidentally, a great deal of infor- 
mation has been gathered concerning other original families o^ the same name. 

tThe accounts are in the issues of July 29, and July 12, 1777, respectively. The files of 
the Providence Gazette are preserved in the library of the Rhode Island Historical 
Society. The letter in the Post appears to have been written by the Providence corre- 
spondent, and may be found in the "Diary of the American Revolution." Frank Moore. 
Published by Charles Scribner, New York, i860. Vol. I, page 470, note i. The number 
forty-six includes Barton himself, and his servant, Guy Watson, Jack Sisson, or Prince 
(the black), who was presumably, not of the "troops belonging to the State of Rhode 
Island." Mrs. Williams' Biography, page 48, Une 3; page 128, line 18. Also Rhode Island 
Historical Tracts. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 103 

written Prince; and he says he died at Plymoutli in 1821, 
aged seventy -eight years. The name given by Mr. Barton 
must be correct, for he has '•'-the original paper of his father. ^^ 

These statements are the only ones upon the subject I have 
been able to find that are positive; and knowing that the 
error they conceal, might measureably detract from John 
Paul's just reputation, I proceeded to investigate the grounds 
they were made upon. 

What was this original paper? General Barton, in his own 
account, does not give the names of his men; and the Rev. 
James Pierce Root, of Providence, who searched the archives 
of the State House for me, and examined Barton's manu- 
scripts and the military papers preserved in the library of 
the Rhode Island Historical Society, could not find any 
original list of them. Professor J. Lewis Diman knew of 
none. Hon. John R. Bartlett, of whom Mr. Lossing wrote 
me: "I know of no man so capable to give correct informa- 
tion concerning Rhode Island history," liad no knowledge of 
such a list. Mr. Lossing, liimself, says that the names in the 
Field Book were printed only from a copy of the original 
sent him by John B. Barton, above named. His son, Robert 
H. Barton, of Providence, into whose possession have fallen 
his grandfather's swords and commissions, and many of his 
father's and grandfathei-'s paper's, has no sucli list, and knows 
of none, exce[)t that published in Mrs. William's biogra.phy.* 
And Mrs. Williams, wlio knew Barton, and had access to his 
papers, shortly after his death, remarks. ''It is much to be re- 
gretted that tlie whole of the names of those brave men were 
not preserved." 

Yet tlie mistake is readily explained. Intrinsically, the 
list does not appear to liave been made by Barton at all, for 
in regard to the names of the officers who volunteered to go 
with him, it differs materially, from the statement he makes 

* Letters from his son William Barton, 239 Westminister Street, Providence, R. I. 
dated February 20, and March 6, 1886. I am under great obligation to him for his generous 
interest. 



104 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

in his own account of the expedition.* On the other hand, 
the names in the list are the same as those published by Mrs. 
Williams, in 1839. They are given in the same order, and 
spelled in the same way, with the exception, only, of four 
errors, of such a nature tha,t they are themselves evidences of 
transcribing.! Moreover, there is not only a possibility, but 
almost a certainty, that two such lists derived from different 
sources, one set down by a leader who knew the facts, the 
other made up by his biographer, from the memory of surviv- 
ors, would differ widely. Undoubtedly, "the original paper" 
was Barton's own account of the expedition, in manuscript, 
then in the possession of his son, and afterwards presented to 
the Rhode Island Historical Society; and Mr. Lossing's 
inability to have it at hand at the time of writing the note, 
gave rise, possibly, to a misapprehension that it contained a 
list of the men. 

Mrs. Williams, however, whose interest and opportunities 
informed her particularly, manifests much uncertainty con- 
cerning the number of men engaged. Her estimates range 
from forty-seven to fifty-one, and she confesses her inability 
to determine precisely how many. Yet she gives a list of all 
the names she can gather, depending, principally, upon the 
memories of two men who had lived longer than their alloted 
time. She says: '-Of all the company who figured on that 
memorable night, in the capture, we are not aware that but 
two remain — Samuel Cory, now residing in Portsmouth, and 

* According to the Field Book of the Revolution, Vol. I, page 644, note 1, there were-* 
"Officers — Andrew Stanton, Eleazer Adams, Samuel Potter, John Wilcox. Non-commis- 
sioned officers— Joshua Babcock and Samuel Phillips." 

According to Barton's manuscript above mentioned: "The names of the officers were, 
Samuel Phillips, Lieut. James Porter or Potter, Captain Joshua Babcock, Lieut. Andrew 
Stanton, and Ensign John Wilcocks. Captain Ebenezer Adams volunteered with us at 
Warwick Neck." 

t The number of names in each list is forty. Mrs. Williams, at pages 127 and 12S, di- 
vides them into three classes: Officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates, and gives 
the names of each class in two columns. In the Field Book, Vol. I, page 644, note i, the 
names are given in the same classes, but having been run together, those of the first col- 
umn are followed by those of the second column. There is no change in the. order, except- 
ing, only, in the name of Pardon Cory, which seems to have been momentarily overlooked 
in transcribing, and is placed after the name of Thomas Wilcox, instead of before. In 
spelling, the name Ebenezer Adams, in the original, appears Eleazer Adams in the copy. 
And the sirnames of Benjamin Prew, and Charles Hassett, are spelled Pren, and Havett. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY 105 

Mr. Whitney, of New York." And yet she lias even forgot- 
ten to include "Mr. Whitney" in her list of the "immortal 
forty." 

That list has been copied by Diman, and by Cowell; and 
has been accepted, not onl}^ without criticism, but almost 
Avithout comment, for fifty years. Nevertheless, though un- 
doubtedly reliable enough to prove that those whom it names 
accompanied Barton, it is not based upon certain and thor- 
ough knowledge, is not broad enough and strong enough to 
be negative evidence, and cannot exclude those whom it 
omits, from the honors of such patriotic service. 

Cowell, in "The Spirit of '76," gives a roster of the brigade 
raised from New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island and 
the Providence Plantations, and Massachusetts Bay, for the 
defense of Rhode Island, pursuant to the recommendation of 
the Convention of the Committees of Safety, that met in 
Providence, December 25, 1776. It consisted of Colonel 
John Topham's and Colonel Archibald Crary's regiments of 
foot, and Colonel Robert Elliott's artillery. They were first 
enlisted for fifteen months ending March 16, 1778, and by an 
act of the General Assembly, for twelvemonths ending March 
16, 1779, and again, for twelve montlis ending March 16, 
1780. 

Of those named above as having been with Barton at Pres- 
cott's capture. Captain Ebenezer Adams, avIio joined him at 
Warwick Neck, was possibly from the battery stationed 
there. Jack Sherman, Jedediah Grenale, Thomas Wilcox 
and John Hunt, were, according to the roster, men of Elli- 
ott's artillery. James Potter, James Parker and Jack Sisson, 
appear to have been men of Crary's regiment, and nearly all 
the rest. 

Lieut. Andrew Stanton, fifer John Wilcox, Captain Joshua 
Babcock, Major Samuel Phillips, and Isaac Brown, Billing- 
ton Crumb, Samuel Apis, Alderman Crank, Samuel Cory, 
Oliver Simmons, corporal Clark Crandall, Joel Briggs, Joseph 
Ralph, James Weaver, Daniel Page, Sampson George, Wil- 
liam Bruff, Lieut, Daniel Wale, and Nathan Smith, wera 



106 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

members of Colonel, Topham's regiment, stationed at Tiver- 
ton in July, 1777, of which Barton, himself, was lieutenant- 
colonel. 

John Paul and Peter Paul, his brother, bekjnged to this 
regiment. According to the roster, John Paul was a ser- 
geant. He was then in the vigor of manhood, and of strength 
and agility that have become proverbial. He was used to the 
sea, and his home was at Dighton, on the Taunton river, that 
ebbed and flowed with the tides of Narragansett bay. Short- 
ly after his discharge he removed to Westminster, Windham 
County, Vermont, and there, with what he had probably 
saved from a soldier's pay. and received from Rhode Island 
as his part of the reward for Prescott's capture, he bought a 
farm, and lived, an independent, thrifty. God-fearing man.* 
January 20, 1804, he died, leaving eleven children. Two of 
them were born in Dighton. All of them knew that he was 
with Barton. Prescott's hat and metal inkstand, which he 
brought away, were in tlie family many years. He made his 
son Joshua wear the hat, and often met his protests by say- 
ing: "It was General Prescott's hat, and. is good enough!" 
Joshua died in Ohio, Herkimer County, New York, May 8, 
1869, aged eighty-nine years; and his eldest brother, John 
Paul, who helped him one day, to cut up tlie obnoxious hat, 
and hide the pieces in a stump, died at the same place, Janu- 
ary 1, 1859, aged eighty. A son of the former, Charles H. 
Paul, born April 5, 1807, was many years a Justice of the 
Peace at Mohawk, Herkimer County, New York, and is liv- 
ing there now. Of the latter's children, Richard O. Paul, 
born December 27, 1813, and Edwin Paul, born August 11, 
1821, are yet living, one at Wilmurt, Herkimer County, and 

* John Paul was born in 1755, and in 1777 was about twenty-two years old. His strength 
and agility at wrestlings and raisings, for many years afterwards, are proved by anecdotes 
preserved by his kindred. Knowledge of the locality, and of the sea, were grounds upon 
which Barton selected the volunteers. John Paul's term of enlistment expired March 16) 
1780, and his sons, Joseph and Benjamin, twins, were born in Westminster, Vermont, June 
20, 1782. He bought the north half of lot number eleven in the eighth range of eighty 
acre lots, in that township, of Benjamin Bellov.'s, July 23, 1783, and shortly afterwards, 
other lands. His parents lived at Dighton, Mass., until after 1789, for March 13, of that 
year, they gave house and farm to their son Peter, on condition that he should support 
them through life. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 107 

the other at Evans Mills, Jefferson County, New York. The 
youngest of these grandchildren was born less than eighteen 
years after John Paul died, and more than thirty-seven years 
before his own father's death. And each of them stoutly 
and honestly asserts what his father and the brothers and 
sisters of his father said — the story I have told. 

About 1805 the family removed from Westminster, going 
westward across the mountains into New York. In Vermont 
they had been separated from other branches. In New York 
they were isolated, and soon forgotten. Yet the story of the 
part born by John Paul in Prescott's capture is still pre- 
served at the old homestead, in Dighton, Massachusetts, by 
the grandchildren of his younger brother Peter, who was by 
his side in the ranks of Barton's regiment, and went with 
the expedition, that memorable night in July, to the island, 
w^here he was stationed at the creek to guard the boats; and 
in New Jersey, by the grandchildren of his brother, Benjamin 
Paul, who was at Germantown, Valley Forge and Monmouth; 
by the descendants of his sister Elizabeth, who married Asa 
Briggs, another soldier of the revolution, and settled at Ply- 
mouth, Vermont; and by the descendants of his brother James 
Paul, my great-grandfather, who was not ohl enough to be of 
service in the war. 

He, too, having found his way up the Connecticut valley 
into Vermont, eventually settled at Northfield; and his son 
Araos Paul, born there March 11, 1793, was a merchant at 
Danville from 1819 to 1830, and afterwards clerk of the 
courts of Caledonia county. General Barton, Avho was for 
fourteen years confined to the jail limits of Danville, mani 
fested in many ways peculiar interest and confidence in my 
grandfather. He did his banking at my grandfather's store; 
and often, idling away an hour there, spoke of John Paul's 
strength and courage, and of the address with which he 
helped to secure the sentinel quietly, and laughing, of the 
haste, yet courtesy, with which he dragged Prescott to the 
boats. 



108 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

To Amos Paul's brother, also, Daniel Jewett Paul, born 
May 4, 1807, Barton told these things many times, at Dan- 
ville, wliile fondly exhibiting his swords and relating the 
story of that bold invasion of the British camp. Daniel 
Paul's home was then at Danville, and he is still living at 
Milwaukee, to attest these facts. 

On learning of little more than his testimony, Mr. Lossing 
was kind enough to write me: '^The evidence seems conclu- 
sive in favor of the probability that your kinsman, John Paul, 
was a participant with Colonel Barton in the capture of 
Prescott." 

Certainly, considering that testimony and the traditions, 
circumstances, and records now presented, together with the 
pointed way in which they all concur, no reasonable man can 
doubt that John White Paul was one of those who shared 
with Barton the perils and honors of that enterprise; and so 
I shall record him. 

Is there another of Barton's volunteers whose conduct has 
not yet been fairly recorded? Whose children never doubted 
that his reputation was secure in the certainty of their own 
knowledge of his practical devotion to the principles of the 
constitution; whose grandchildren are diffidently permitting 
that knowledge to fade into belief, belief that will subside 
into tradition, and be questioned? Let some one of his pos- 
terity speak. Facts like these are facts of history. An inter- 
est in our own history is an evidence of patriotism. And 
people are beginning to have time to be patriotic again. 



In 1760, a lottery was granted by the Legislature of Con- 
necticut to build a light-house at the entrance of New Lon- 
don harbor. This was the first light-house on the Connecti- 
cut coast. A light-house of some sort had previously been 
erected at the mouth of the harbor. Allusions to it are found 
after 1750, but nothing that shows wheu it was built or how 
maintained. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 109 



Notes. 



Founder of Harvard College. — Many people, puzzled 
to see on the statue of John Harvard the inscription "Found- 
er, 1638,'' have asked that the matter be explained. It has 
always been known that Harvard was founded in 1636, and 
that it was John Harvard who endowed the money and gave 
the college its name. The facts are that in 1636 the Gener- 
al Court of the Colony of Massachusetts voted a sum of money 
toward the foundino- of a school or colles"e. In 1638 John 
Harvard died and left half of liis property to the school 
which had been founded two years before. 

The Massachusetts Socip:ty of the Sons of the 
American Keyolution, wliich embraces in its membership 
all male descendants, liow^ever remote, of soldiers, sailors and 
recognized patriots who did service in the struggle for inde- 
pendence, has enrolled the names of twenty-one "own sons" 
of soldiers who served during 1775 to 1783. The oldest of 
these, Oliver Lawrence Wheeler of Ashbey_, Mass., is ninety- 
six years and seven months old, and the youngest, Elbridge 
G. Snow of Fitclibui-g, is fifty-six. The list of "own sons" is 
in excess of the combined list from all other States. A society 
of female descendants will soon ])e organized in Massachu- 
setts. 

The Kenebec, Maine, Natural History and Antiqua- 
rian Society has just been organized, its object Ijeing to 
study the natural and civil history and antiquities of the Ken- 
ebec Valley and adjacent territory, a i-egion rich in material 
for the purpose. The society plans to begin a collection of 
antiquities at once. Dr. W. Scott Hill is president and S. L. 
Boardman vice president. 



110 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Beverly, Mass., Historical Society. — At a meeting in 
Beverly, Mass., it was voted to form a society for the purpose 
of preserving matters of historical interest to the town. E. 
L. Giddings was chosen chairman, Charles Woodbury, secre- 
tary, and these gentlemen, with the following persons, were 
appointed a committee on arrangements: A. A. Galloupe, 
Lucy Larcom, Miss Sohier, Hannah Rantoul, John S. Baker, 
R. W. Boyden, H. L. Walker, R. R. Endicott, Geo. E. Wood- 
bury. 

An Historical Building Saved. — The Sons of the Rev- 
olution of Connecticut, were unsuccessful in their attempt to 
preserve the old town house at Norwichtown, but have been 
successful in securing the "old war office" in Lebanon. The 
building was lately deeded to Jonathan Trumbull of Norwich, 
president of the Connecticut Division of the Sons of the Rev- 
olution, and a grandson of Jonathan Trumbull of Revolu- 
tionary fame. The building is not behind Faneuil Hall in 
historic interest. The building has been neglected, but now 
it will be cared for, and it is said the people are willing to 
have it placed on the village green. The building was used 
as an office by Governor Trumbull in the Revolutionary 
times; and, according to tradition, Washington, Lafayette 
and Franklin have transacted business in it. E. A. B. 

The Grave of Rev. Warham Williams, W4.LTHAM, 
Mass. — Near the southwest corner of the burial ground at 
Waltham, Mass., are several slate head stones, once the only 
kind of memorial used in our ancient place of the dead, which 
were generally surmounted by a rudely sculptured winged 
cherub. These monuments referred to, stand in a line where, 
side by side, repose the remains of seven of the family of Rev. 
Warham Williams, first minister of the church in Waltham, 
successor of Rev. Saml. Angier after the place of worship of 
the Middle Precinct, Watertown, was established in that part 
afterwards called the West Precinct, and subsequently incor- 
porated as Waltham. He was the son of Rev. John Williams 
of Deerfield, born Sept. 7, 1699, grad. Harv. Coll. 1719, and 



MAGAZINE OF NE\Y ENGLAND HISTORY. Ill 

ordained 1723. His father's captivity among the Indians of 
Canada was shared by him in childhood with other members 
of the family. His epitaph is as follows: 

Here lie ye Remains of ye excellent, pious, & learned Di- 
vine, ye late Revd. Mr. Warham Williams, ye first and be- 
loved Pastor of ye Chh. in Waltham. He was indeed a 
burning and shining Light, of superior natural Powers and 
acquired Abilities, diligent in Study, apt to teach, fervent in 
Prayer, accurate and instructive in preaching, prudent and 
faithful in Discipline, tender and skilful in Comforting, grave 
in Deportment, agreeable and edifying in Conversation, 
meek towards all men, constant and candid in Friendship, 
endearing in every Relation, resigned in adversity, a bright 
Example in Behaviour and Doctrine, universally esteemed; 
and Died greatly lamented; In 3^e Pulpit Febry. 10th he was 
struck with ye Palsey, which put an End to his invaluable 
Life June 22d 1751 in ye 29t]i Year of his Ministry and 52d 
of his Age. 

His Flesli also resteth in Hope. 

Portsmouth, N. H., Historical Society. — At a prelim- 
inary meeting of tlie Portsmoutli Historical Society held Mon- 
day, January 26th, 91, in the office of Messrs. Frink & Batch- 
elder, Portsmouth, N. H., plans were discussed for a full or- 
ganization of an association for the purpose of preserving, 
for the benefit of future generations, the unwritten history 
of the old town, its legends, traditions and quaint folklore, 
and to perpetuate the name and fame of the gallant sons of 
Portsmouth who have served their country upon field and 
floor, to record the achievements of the eminent men who 
have become famous in the arts of peace, and to designate by 
suitabl}^ inscribed tablets the ancient landmarks of Colonial 
days. 

Earle Family. — Pliny Earle, M. D., of Northampton, 
Mass., was forced to go to press in 1888, with his "Descend- 
ants of Ralph Earl," without giving the maiden name of the 
emigrant's wife. Ralph Earle died at Portsmouth, R. I., 
1678. Recently the following extract from the Diary of 
Samuel Sewall, Vol. I. page 501, in Massachusetts Historical 



112 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Collections, Vol. 5, 5th series, has been sent out by Mr. Earle, 
with the request that it be pasted in the book "Ralph Earle 
and his Descendants" on page 17. 

"1699, Sept, 15, Friday, Mr. Newton and I rode to Newport; see aged Joan Savage (now 
Earl) by the way. Her husband, Ralph Earle, was born 1606, and his wife was ten or 
eleven years older than he; so she is esteemed to be one hundred and five years old." 

Thomas Savage came early to Portsmouth, R. I., but soon 
returned to England. Was Joan a sister or other relative of 
his? The records of the town in which he lived may give 
some information in regard to Ralph Earl. 

The Backus Memorial. — The Baptist churches of Con- 
necticut held on Sunday, Jan. 11, special services in behalf 
of the Backus memorial fund, which is to be expended in the 
erection of a memorial in North Middleborough, Mass., to the 
memory of Rev. Isaac Backus. He w^as born in Norwich, 
Jan. 9, 1724, and the 167th anniversary of his birth occured 
Jan. 9, 1891. He was ordained as a preacher in Middleborough 
Mass. In 1748 he became the pastor of a new Congregation- 
al society in that place, but in 17 49 he, with part of his con. 
gregation, became converted to the Baptist faith and with, 
them he organized a Baptist society. He was a prominent 
divine, was for thirty-four years a trustee of Brown Univer- 
sity, and a voluminous writer, his most important work being 
a "History of New England, with special reference to the 
Baptists." 

In Memory of Rev. Samuel Langdon, D. D. — A hand- 
some tablet has recently been added to those in the North 
Church, at Portsmouth, N. H. It was placed there by Mr. 
Thomas A. Harris, a lineal descendant of Dr. Langdon. The 
tablet bears the following inscription: — 

MEMORIAM. 

REV. SAMUEL LANGDON, D. D. 



Born in Boston, Jan. ii, 1723. 

Chaplain to the New Hampshire troops at the siege of 
Louisburg, in 1745. Pastor of this Church, 1747 to 1774. 
President of Harvard College, 1774 to 1780. Offered the 
prayer for the assembled army the night previous to the 
battleof Bunker Hill. 

An influential member of the N. H. Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1788, for the adoption of the Federal Constitu- 
tion. 

Pastor of the Church at Hampton Falls, 1781 to 1797. 
Died Nov, 29, 1797. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 113 



Queries. 

historical. 

11. The Oldest Baptist Church. — Which is the old- 
est church, the one founded in Providence, R. I., by Roger 
Williams, or the one at Newport, R. I., by John Clark? In 
1652 there was a division in the church at Providence, which 
is the now existing church? 

Duffau, Texas, ' J. W. Hearn. 

12. The First Grammar School in Boston, Mass. — 
In 1666 the town of Boston "agreed with Mr. Dannell Hin- 
cheman for X40 per ann. to assist Mr. Woodmansey in the 
Grammar school, and teach children to wTight, the year to 
begin the 4th of March 1665-6." Was this the first "Gram- 
mar" school in Boston? When was it established? 

Rex. 

13. Col. Starr of Connecticut. — At what time was 
Elias Starr Colonel of the fifteenth regiment of Infantry of 
Conn ? It was between 1800 and 1825. I would like to know 
the date of his commission if possible. 

14. State Treasurer of New Hampshire,1791. — In 
1791 Hon. John T. Gilman, of Exeter, was elected State 
Treasurer by the Legislature. He soon after his election re- 
signed. Who was elected to fill the vacanc}"? 

N. H. 

Gcpcalogical. 

15. Lane. — Can any one give the parentage of Capt. John 
Lane, of York Co., Me? I have supposed that he was a son 
of William Lane of Boston, 1650, whose son John was in 



114 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

King Phirlip's war, in 1G74, under Capt. Pool, in the company 
in which Samuel (son of William) Lane served. The tra- 
ditions diffei'ino- from this do not seem reliable. In 1692 he 
married in Newbury, Mass., Joanna Davenson. Ten years 
later, he was Capt. Lane, and served some 15 or 20 years as 
an officer in So. Eastern, Maine. 
Exeter, N. H. ' Jacob Chapman. 

16. Salisbury — Eddy. — William Salisbury and Joice 
Eddy were married in Warren, R. I., March 20, 1774, and had 
the following children: Mary, Twins, Joseph, Phebe, William, 
Barnard and Belcher. The said William and Joice Salisbury 
removed to Brattleboro, Vt., about 1779. It is thought he 
was born in Bristol, and lived in Warren. He is said to have 
been a ship carpenter or builder. When and where was the 
said William Salisbur}^ born, and what is his ancestry? When 
and where was Joice Eddy born, and what is her ancestry? 
(Notes. Joseph and Ruth (Belcher) Eddy had the following 
children born in Bristol from 1729 to 1745: Belcher, Abigail 
Rebecca, Joseph, Elizabeth, Ruth, Sarah, and Joice born Oct. 
3, 1745. Was this Joyce the Joice who married William Salis- 
bury in Warren, Marcli 20, 1774)? 

Frovidence, R. L Edson Salisbury Jones. 

17. Choate. — Can any one give the names and dates of 
birth of the children of Stephen and Rebecca (Bowman) 
Choate, of Roxbury, Mass., who were married Feb. 4, 1730? 

E.O.J. 

18. Johnson. — When did John Johnson settle at Ipswich, 
Mass., and when did he arrive from England? Information 
wanted in regard to the descendants of his grandsons John 
and James Johnson of And over, Mass. John had a son John, 
and James had Andrew, Obadiah, Joseph, James and Peter. 
The last two were in the battle of Bunker Hill. Information 
also wanted of descendants of Isaac and Josiah Johnson who 
were in Leominster, Mass., in 1752. Isaac had a son Isaac, 
and Josiah had a son Josiah, b. Jan. 20, 1752. 

North Greenfield, Wis., Rev. W. W. Johnson. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 115 

19. Eaton. — I wish to obtain the maiden name of Jemima, 
wife of Samuel Eaton, of Tolland, Conn., whose daughter 
Bethiah, born 1733 was my great grandmother. 

66 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass., E. G. Davis. 

20. Jones. ( ). Cornelius & Abigail ( ) Jones 

were the.parents of the following children, born in Dighton, 
Mass., from 1719 to 1744 — Priscilla, Henry, Cornelius, Eli- 
jah, born Apr. 11, 1725, Jaca, Charles, b. Dec. 14, 1780, Abi- 
gail, Benjamin, Silvester, Priscilla and Catherney. When 
and where was Cornelius, the father, born? When, where and 
by whom was he married to Abigail — ? When and where did 
Cornelius die, and where is he buried? What is his ancestry? 
What Avas the maiden name of Abigail (w. of Cornelius)? 
When and where was she born? When and where did she 
die, and wliere is she buried? What is her ancestry? (Notes — 
A Cornelius Jones was b. in Bristol, Nov. 1, 1693, s. of Cor- 
nelius and Mercy. A Cornelius Jones d. in Berkley about 
1747, for his son Charles had Geo. Pitts of Dighton, appoint- 
ed his guardian, Apr. 6, 1747, the said Charles then "being 
above the age of 14." A Cornelius Jones m. (at an unknown 
date) Mercy Cory, dau. of William and Mary (Earle) Cory, 
of Portsmouth, R. I. (Gen. Die. of R. I. p. 5Q). When and 
where did Cornelius Jones (husband of Mercy Cory) die, 
and where is he buried? When and where was he born and 
what is his ancestry? 

Providence, R. L, Edson Salisbury Jones. 

21. Crandall. — Wanted parentage, births, deaths, and 
descendants of the following: — Edward Crandall and wife 
Anna, of Tolland, Conn., in 1788 — also Giles Crandall and 
wife Elizabeth of same place 1761 — Isaac Crandall, early sett- 
ler of Winchester, N. H. — Jane Crandall and Chipman Cobb, 
m. in Portland, Me., 1788. — Philip Crandall and Martha 
Cox, in same place 1784. — Philip Crandall and Mary Bab- 
bage, m. in No. Yarmouth 1750. — John Crandall and Betty 
Field, m. in Falmouth, Me., 1762. — John Crandall, b. in 



116 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOBY. 

Providence (?) about 175 li, and Nancy Lane, b. in Salem, 
Mass. — Eber Crandall and Hannah or Abigail Sprague, re- 
moved from Martha's Vineyard to Wilkesbarre, Pa., before 
the massacre.— Jared Crandall and Lydia Pendleton m. in 
Stonington, 1765. — Abraham, Gary and William Crandall, 
living in Stonington in 1790. — Adam Crandall and Eunice 
Blodget, m. in Stonington, 1781. — Philip Crandall and 
Margaret Fry, his wife, living in Newport, R. I., in 1795. 
56 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass., E. G. Davis. 

22. Messer. — 1, Where did he come from and who were 
the parents of Richard Mercer (Messer)? He married March 
18, 1669, Hannah Shatswell, born August 5, 1651, daughter 
of Theopholas and Susanna (Bos worth) Shatswell. They had. 
a son Abiel, born Dec. 27, 1670, all of Haverhill Mass. 2, 
Who were the parents of Daniel Messer of Bow, N. H., born 
1760, died April 17, 1815, married Elizabeth Saunders of 
Salem, N. H., June 13, 1780. They had Abigail, William, 
Amos, Daniel, Betsey, Oliver, Sally and Peasley. I am pre- 
paring a genealogy of the Messers, correspondence with those 
possessing information, relating to the Messers in this coun- 
try, and in Europe, is earnestly desired. 

Onarga, Iroquois Co. III., MosES H. Messer. 

23. Myers.— I would like to learn the parentage of the 
brothers J^d. Myers, William Myers, Gilbert M. P. Myers 
(born April 12, 1785, died 1827), and Beekman Myers. I 
have notes on Hobbell (1727), Patterson (1731), and M^^ers. 
Will be pleased to correspond with those interested. 

Adrian, Mich., Fred'k B. Stebbins. 

24. WooD-KiNGSLEY. — 1. A John Wood settled at 
Groton (then New London) Conn., in 1660. Has any one 
traced his descendants? I would like to correspond with any 
one interested. 2. One of my ancestors was Rufus Kingsley, 
born 1763. His father Avas probably Jonathan, of Eastern 
Conn. Father and son were both in battle of Bunker Hill. 
Who can inform me about this family? 

Westfield, N. F., Frank B. Lamb. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 117 

25. Cock- Rushmore- Prior- Birdsall- Alling. — ^In- 
formation desired upon the following points. — Family names 
of Sarah, wife of James Cock, before 1655, Martha, wife of 
Thomas Rushmore before 1700, Mary wife of Matthew Prior 
before 1670, Dorothy, second wife of John Cock, m. after 

1690, wife of Nathan Birdsall before 1660, name of wife 

and parentage of Abraham Alling, blacksmith, who came to 
Oysterbay, L. I. about 1677. Exchange of information as to 
genealogy of early Queens Co., N. Y. families is offered by 

Glen Cove^ Queens Co. N. F., George W. Cocks. 

26. Jones-Austin. — Elijah Jones (probably that son of 
Cornelius and Abigail wlio was born in Dighton, Mass., Apr. 
11, 1725) is said to have ])een a sliipwright,also a sea captain 
and to have been drowned at sea (probably after 1772.) In- 
tentions of marriage were declared in Dighton between 
Elijah Jones and Deborah Austin, both of Dighton, Jan. 24, 
1746-7. When, where and by whom were Elijah and Debo- 
rah married? When and from what ship was Elijah drowned? 
When and where was Deborah Austin bom? When and 
where did she die and where was she buried? What is her 
ancestry? (Notes. Elijah and Deborah Jones had the fol- 
lowing children — Elijah, Pi'iscilla, Aquila and Increase, born 
in Digliton, from 1747 to 1752, and Setli, Benson, Miriam, 
Income, b. June 28, 1757, and Mary, born at an unknown 
place or places. Priscilla m. Elisha Johnson, of Taunton, 
Increase m. Hannah Bowen, of Rehoboth, and Income m. 
Mary Kingsley, dau. of Asa and Huhlah (Bowen) Kingsley, 
of Swansea.) Where was Income Jones born, and in what 
Town or Church Records is his birth recorded (book and 
page)? 

Frovlde7ice, R. /., Edson Salisbury Jones. 

27. Wflliams. — Parents oE the following and date of 
birth wanted; also names and dates of birth of children: 
Elizabeth Haley who married Nathan Williams (b. at Ston- 
ington, Ct., July 22, 1720); 



118 MAGAZINE OE NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Elizabeth Gallup who married Atwood Williams (b. at S., 

Apr. 16, 1723); 
Rebecca Satterly who married Warham Williams (bp. at S., 

Apr. 9, 1727): 
Daniel Brewster who married Phebe Williams, May 31, 

1753 at S., (bp. at S., March 8, 1731;) 
Joshua Culver who married Sarah Wilhams (b. at S., March 

2, 1713); 
Richard Williams who married Eunice Williams, (b. at S., 

Dec. 15,1732.) 

Those named Williams, except Richard, were children of 

Isaac and Sarah (Denison) Williams of Stonington. 

Edward H. Williams, Jr. 
117 Church st., Bethlehtm^ Penn. 

28. Weaver. Who can tell me anything about John 
Weaver and Patience, his wife, who with sons Constont and 
John, Jr., were in Glocester and Killingly between 1746 and 
1754? May have come from Swanzey. Was Elizabeth Weaver 
who married Joshua King (Glocester records) April 2, 1750 
their daughter? Constont, the son, marrried, first, Aug. 27, 

1750 Elizabeth Allen of Killingly, and second, Elethea . 

What was second wife's maiden name? Anv information 
about this family welcomed. 

Who can give me any information as to ancestors, rela- 
lationship, or descendants of any of the following Weavers 
whose marriages by the Swanzey town records are here set 
down: 

May 25, 1728, Thomas Francis and Hannah Weaver. 

Sept. 18, 1787, Edward Weaver and Ale Chase. 

July 12, 1738, William Wood Jr., of Rehoboth and Patience 

Weaver of Swanzey. 
Feb. 24, 1742, Peter Weaver and Phebe Baker. 
Nov. 29, 1745, David Evins Jr., of Freetown and Anne 

Weaver. 
Jan. 29, 1750-1, Samuel Fowler and Mary Weaver both of 

Swanzey. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 119 

Marcli 31, 1754, Peter Weaver of Swanzey and Lydia Davis 

of Freetown. 
May 23, 1790; Peter Weaver and Sarali Luther, both of 

Swanzey. 
Jan. 20, 1726-7, Thomas Lewis and Phebe Weaver both of 

Rehoboth. 
The last marriage is from the Rehoboth town records. 
The following data from the land and probate records at 
Taunton, about Peter Weaver, may identify him to some one 
who can put me on the track of additional particulars. Feb. 
1, 1743-4, Peter Weaver of Swanzey, boatman, bought 4 acres 
of land in Swanzey, of Robert and Hepzabeth Gibbs for c£135 
Jan. 17, 1745, Peter Weaver of Swanzey, yeoman, bouglit 
20f acres of land in Swanzey, '4n ye Shawammett purchase" 
of Benjamin Kinsley, yeoman, for X683. The bounds men- 
tioned are Edward Slead's land and Taunton river. Riglit 
was reserved for a ])ridle way, "for people to pass and repass 
* * * * to go to the mill and for the use and 
benefit of ye mill." 

July 25, 1802, Will of Peter Weaver of Swanzey, made. It 
mentions wife Sarah, daughters Hannah Trott, Anna Chase, 
Mary Cartwright, Pliebe Terry and Alice Boyce; sons, 
Tliomas, Joseph, Benjamin and Jonathan (lasttwo deceased); 
and grandchildren, Peter Weaver, Benjamin Weaver Chase, 
Lydia Weaver, Caudicc Weaver and Elizabeth Dean. 

Oren W. Weaver. 

Department of Laho)\ Washington^ I). C. 

20. Chester. — Leonard Chester, came from Blady, Eng- 
land, and settled in Westfield, Conn. He married, prob. in 

England, Mary . What was her maiden name? Their 

children were: 

I. John, b. August 3, 1635, m. Sarah Wells, Feb. 1653. 

He died Feb. 28, 1698. 
n. Dorcas, b. November 5, 1637, m. Rev. Samuel Whit- 
ing, November 12, 1656. He died Feb. 16, 1713, 



120 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

III. Stephen, b. May, 3, 1639, d. April 23, 1705. 

IV. Mary b. January 15, 1641. 

V. Prudence, b. February 16, 1648, m. Capt. Thomas 
Russell, December 30, 1669, He died October 21, 
1678. 
VI. Eunice, b. January 15, 1645, m. Richard Sprague, 

February 1, 1672. He died May 27, 1676. 
VII. Mercy, b. February 15, 1647, d. September 15, 1669. 

p. T. 

• 

30. Reed, — Daniel Reed, son of James and Joanna 
(^Castle) Reed of Amenia, N. Y., was born April 15, 1761. 
Whom did he marry? Pliny. 

{Replies. 

2. — QuiNNATissiT, Conn. — G. R., in the January num- 
ber of 1891, is mistaken in saying that Quinnatissit is, or 
ever was, a village in the town of Woodstock, Conn. Wood- 
stock was first incorporated by Massachusetts in 1690, and 
remained under the jurisdiction of the Colony until 1749, 
when it was annexed to Connecticut. Quinnatissit was the 
Indian name of a large tract of land which was included in 
the town of Killingly, Conn., when it was incorporated in 
1708, and so continued until it was included in the town of 
Thompson, Conn., which was incorporated in May 1785. If 
G. R., will look at page 175 of the first volume of Miss Ellen 
D. Larned's history of Windham County, he will find an in- 
teresting sketch of Quinnatissit, Conn. 

Stonington^ Conn.^ Richard A. Wheeler. 

8. — An Invitation to Settle in New England. — The 
lines quoted can be found at the close of that witty book, by 
"The Simple Cobbler of Agawam in America," another name 
for Rev. Nathaniel Ward, of Ipswich. It was first published 
in 1645. Five different editions were issued in 1647. In 
1843, an edition, edited by D. Pulsifer, was published in 
Boston. — Ed. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 121 



Historical Societies. 




HE Collector for April, a monthly bulletin for Auto- 
graph Collectors, in an article on "Lost Autographs," 
has something to say about Historical Societies. As 
tlie article is not credited to any particular contribu- 
tor it is fair to presume that the editor is the author of the 
article. In referring to the loss and destruction of valuable 
documents and letters he says: 

'^The best place for a valua])le letter is in the cabinet of 
an intelligent collector. He will guard it carefully, and it 
will be easily available for historical purposes. Historical 
societies would seem to be the proper places of deposit for 
them, but in most cases tliis is not so. A man who would 
not steal from a private owner, will pilfer without conscience 
from a society. What belongs to all belongs to none. Often 
the governors of such societies are men selected for their 
money or social importance, and they care nothing for old let- 
ters. A very great many historical societies are inert and life- 
less — existing rather in name than in anything they accom- 
plish. Thousands of dollars' worth of the most valuable his- 
torical material passes througli my hands every year. I do 
not think I have ever sold five dollars' worth to a historical 
society. We never hear of them bidding at auctions. We 
occasionally read dull reports of their stated meetings in the 
very dull Magazine of American History. If they secure 
anything and actually take care of it, there is little hope of 
getting at it for historical purposes. No society is more 
roundly abused for its inaccessibility than the Boston Histori- 



122 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

cal Society. It is a dog-in-manger business. I don't believe 
that any one knows what is in the Pennsylvania Historical 
Society. For this reason I should advise possessors of old 
papers who do not care to keep them, to sell them at the best 
price possible. They will profit by it financially, and the 
papers will pass into the best hands possible." 

We beg leave to differ with the editor of the Collector and 
claim that "the best place for a valuable letter is in the 
cabinet" of an Historical Society. The Society will certainly 
"guard it carefully, and it will be easily available for histori- 
cal purposes." During the past one hundred years, there 
have been formed nearly two hundred historical societies, the 
greater number of which have perpetuated their organiza- 
tions. The object of these Societies has been to collect and 
diffuse the materials of American history. The first society 
organized was that now known as the Massachusetts Histori- 
cal Society (which is the one referred to, in the Collector, as 
the Boston Historical Society). This organization has been 
in existence just one hundred years. The zeal of the mem- 
bers in securing and preserving historical manuscripts, is 
sufficiently illustrated by the fact that it has collected many 
thousand volumes of manuscripts which relate to every period 
since the founding of the Colonies. This Society has pub- 
lished many volumes which have found their way to the 
shelves of nearly every public library in the United States. 
The Society has therefore, not' only actually taken care of 
the documents and letters in their possession, but has per- 
mitted the historical student in Maine and California to reap 
the benefit of their collection. The Historical Societies of 
New England work side by side with the Public Library. 
Their doors are open to the public; every one is invited, in- 
vestigators especially. It is the duty of the Librarian to 
assist the searcher for a single item, his duty to assist the 
many who, day after day, and week after week, visit the 
rooms in search of family history, and it is his duty to assist 
and to make pleasant the visit of the stranger who, from a 



MAGAZINE OF XE^ E^'GLA^^) HISTOEY. 123 

distant state drops in to look upon the portrait of some distin- 
guished person of ancient5 times, or to simply inquire tlie age 
or history of an old house*. 

It was, perhaps, a mistake of the editor of the Collector in 
referring- to the Pennsylvania Society, which has recently 
been j^resented with a yaluable collection of autographs. In 
this case the ''best place for a yaluable letter,'' in the opinion 
of Mr. Dreer, is in the cabinet of the Pennsylyania Histori- 
cal Society. 

The Collector has recently published many interesting 
communications from a gentleman connected with one of our 
New England Historical Societies. We were pleased to re- 
print one of them. It told of tlie rescue of an old letter^ 
which is now safely gruarded by the New London County 
Historical Society where it can be consulted for historical 
purposes. E. H. T. 



The Old To\yx of Quincy, Mass., is rich in historical 
incidents, and noted as the birthplace and residence of men 
eminent in the early history of our country. Years before her 
granite hills were laid open to supply materials for the foun- 
dations and walls of our public edifices, she gave to the na- 
tion some of the chief corner-stones in the history of our Re- 
public. John Adams, the second President of the United 
States, and John Hancock, the tirst signer of the Declara- 
tion of Indepeixlence. were born and died in this town. It is 
also the birthplace of John Quincy Adams, our sixth Presi- 
dent, and of Edmund Quincy, Fe\y towns in the State are 
so rich in Reyolutionary memories as this. Some of the 
buildings, relics of those ancient days, are still standing, and 
well worth examining, among which are theyenerable houses 
in which Hannah Adams and John Quincy Adams were born. 



The Old Clock that was presented to the First Church 
of Dedham, Mass., by Samuel Dexter, in 1783, is now exhib- 
ited at the Dedham Historical Society. 



124 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Record of Marriages, by Rev. Gardner Thurston, 
Pastor of the Second Bartist Church, New- 
port, R. L 1759-1800. 



1763. 



Jan. 


2. 


a 


18. 


a 


20. 


Feb. 


9. 


(.i 


17. 


u 


17. 


ii 


17. 


u 


17. 


Mch. 


24. 


Apri' 


11. 


*.(. 


11. 


May 


1. 


it 


3. 


June 


20. 


i.i 


24. 


July 


10. 


(.(. 


17. 


a 


28. 


Aug. 


18. 


Sept. 


22. 



(Continued from page 55.) 

Gideon Cornell and Susanna Linican. 

Weston Clarke and Mary Allison. 

Solomon Vanliine of New Slioreliam and Deliver- 
ance Cornell of Middletown. 

Aster Flagg and Florah Burroughs. Black couple. 

William Hookey and Abigail Burroughs. 

George Hazard Peckham of South Kingstown and 
Sarah Taylor of Newport. 

William Weeden and Amy Underwood. 

Nicholas Hazard and Mary Dulucina. 

Benjamin Allen and Sarah Hookey. 

Charles Church and Elizabeth Tewels. 

William Prior and Martha Dickinson. 

Nathan Sheffield of South Kingstown, and Mar- 
tha Rathburn of Newport. 

Benjamin Coggeshall and Mary Anthony. 

John Overland and Wate Spencer. 

John Lassells and Sarah Church. 

John Kilburn and Katharine Stanton. 

John Bush and Elizabeth Smith. 

Ebenezer Carr of Newport, and Phebe Robinson 
of Jamestown. 

John Pulfry and Elizabeth Harris. 

Job Howland of Jamestown, and Sarah Beebe of 
Newport. 



li. 


29. 


Oct. 


9. 


11 


11. 


ii. 


13. 


Nov. 


3. 


1,1. 


20. 


1764, 




Jan. 


8. 


IC 


15. 



MAGAZINE^ OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY 125 

Sept. 22. William Parham of Philadelpliia, and Esther 
Lilibridge of Newport. 
Lemuel Wetherell and Mary Sawdey. 
Israel Brayton and Elizabeth Lawton. 
Eleazer Reed and Mary Atwood. 
Oliver Greenburg and Mary Slocum. 
James Prior and Lidia Inghram. 
William Goddard and Freelove Pearce. 



Michael Blasin and Amey Greenman. 

Peter Taylor, Portsmouth, and Frances Clarke, 
Middle town. 
" 22. Philip Smith, Middletown, and Sarah Smith, 
Newport. 

Benjamin Barker and Mary Pettis. 

Pardon Tillinghast Jr. and Abigail Rogers. 

Samuel Devenport and Frances Cranston. 

John George Rix and Lois Reed. 

John Kinj^on and Ann Kinj^on. 

William Gubbins and Freelove Easton. 

Richard Card and Martha Tripp. 

John Smith and Sarah Hoxsey. 

William Ross and Batlisheba Sisson. 

Joseph Sanford and Mary Clarke. 

John Shaw and Elizabeth Allen. 

Abraham Hardin and Ann Vinson. 

William Caipenter and Ann Gardner. 

Gideon Sowle and Abigail White. 

Nathaniel Locke and Mary Burt. 

Thomas Scott and Elizabeth Baxter. 

Henry Tillingliast and Rebeckah Vose. 

Thomas Crapon and Elizabeth Walker. 

Joseph Larkins and Amey Cory. 

John Helmes and Sarah Wilcocks. 

Job Cook, Tiverton, and Elizabeth Sisson, Ports- 
mouth. 



Feb. 


4. 


a 


5. 


Mch. 


18. 


i; 


25. 


April 24. 


a 


26. 


May 


12. 


i(. 


23. 


June 


3. 


ii. 


13. 


a 


21. 


a 


26. 


July 


1. 


a 


6. 


ic 


30. 


Sept. 


6. 


IC 


13. 


ii 


23. 


CI 


23. 


Oct. 


4. 


u 


21. 



126 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

William Jackson and Elizabeth Philips. 

Charles Wignoron and Mary Taylor. 

William Chandler and Mary Sinkins. 

William Burroughs and Catharine Gardner. 

William Lawton and Rebecca Gibbs. 

James Taylor and Mary Wignoron. 

Joseph Sheffield, Newport, and Mary Peckham, 

Middletown. 
Zephaniah Heeth and Elizabeth Langworthy. 
Joram Place and Rebeckah Platts. 
Clother Pearce and Mary Hill. 

Thomas Weaver and Elizabeth Beard. 

Woodman Billings and Patience Wilcox. 

John Bliven of Newport, and Abigail Lawton, 

Middletown. 
Benjamin Philips and Mary Sheldon. 
Allen James and Elizabeth Pettes. 
William Layhu and Ann Kelsey. 
Oliver Reed and Mary Shearman. 
Joseph Batty and Elizabeth Tayer. 
Richard Leathearn and Mary Little. 
William Fowler and Pheby Hopkins. 
Vallentine Whiteman and Mary Ward. 
John Nicklis and Mary Young. 
William Walter Humphrey and Mary Hookey. 
Joshua Hunt and Rebeckah Shearman. 
Richard Cranston and Sarah Hookey. 
James Lyon and Sarah Sweet. 
Anthony Shaw and Remembrance Goddard. 
James Fry and Dorathy Cartwaite. 
James Goddard and Mary Nichols. 
Thomas Chadwick and Deborah Burck. 
George Sinkins and Mary Aldrige. 
Charles Wrightson and Amey Weeden. 
James Thompson and Elizabeth Geer. 



Nov. 


4. 


ii 


7. 


a 


8. 


a 


11. 


a 


20. 


a 


2L 


Dec. 


8. 


u 


20. 


It 


24. 


Cfc 


26. 


1765. 




Jan. 


27. 


Feb. 


5. 


Li 


7. 


Mch. 


24. 


a 


24. 


a 


31. 


April 


28. 


May 


5. 


Li 


0. 


(( 


5. 


June 


8. 


July 


1. 


(( 


4. 


(( 


7. 


Li 


15. 


a 


17. 


Li 


25. 


Aug. 


4. 


a 


8. 


LL 


11. 


Li 


25. 


(i 


27. 


Oct. 


2. 



Oct. 


27. 


(( 


27. 


Nov. 


7. 


a 


13. 


'a 


24. 


Dec. 


5. 


u 


8. 


ii 


20. 


ik 


26. 


1766. 




Jan. 


9. 


u 


9. 


Mch. 


19. 


(t 


28. 


(( 


30. 


a 


30. 


Apri] 


a. 


(I 


3. 


(t 


17. 


Mav 


18. 


(( 


18. 


(« 


25. 


(( 


28. 


June 


23. 


a 


25. 


July 


1. 


1^ 


20. 


i( 


27. 


Aug. 


9. 


ii. 


17. 


a 


20. 


Sept. 


18. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 127 

Andrew Miorrie, Georgia, and Ann Chace, New- 
port. 

Joshua Stacy and Mary Gay. 

Edward Chapman and Ruth Bayley, both of Mid 
dletown. 

Micliael Crosby and Frances Husband. 

Jonathan Finley and Jane Dennis. 

Wm. Hall and Elizabeth Davis. 

Thomas Townsend and Mary Dyre. 

Rouse Potter and Waite Easton. 

John Atkinson and Hannah Clarke. 

Samuel Tompkins, Newport, and Phebe Clark, 

Middletown. 
Penis Lutlier and Mary Steward. 
Samuel Hathaway and Temperance Trowbridge. 
John Read and Rebecca Rogers, 
John Shrive, Tiverton, and Ann Shrive, Newport. 
Robinson Kelley and Pheby Howard. 
Antliony Wilber and Martha Green. 
James Lawrania and Ann Pearson. 
William Langley and Sarah Dunton. 
Thomas Gardner, South Kino'sto\vn,an{l Katharine 

Gaidner, Newport. 
Benjamin Tuell and Darkis Downer. 

William Brown and Mary Coggeshall, Middle- 
town. 
Jolm Clarke and Mary Bennet. 
William Barron and Ann Humprej's. 
Joseph Worrin and Sarah Taylor. 
Jeremiah Fairbanks and Ann Bridge. 
Joseph Soutlnvick and Elizabeth Sheffield. 
John Shaw and Elizabeth Springford. 
James Clarke and Elizabeth (^oUins Bliss. 
Thomas Cox and Elizabeth Belcher. 
Henry Weeden and Lettuce Melville. 
Isaac Omen and Rebeckah Manchester. 



128 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Edward Green and Rhocla Wilcox. 
Benjamin Hall and Katlierine Pinnegar. 
Daniel Dunion and Amey Murphy. 
William Parker and Deliverance Pry or. 
William Woodard and Ann Anderson. 
Christopher Sylvester and Abigail Holt. 
Pain Johnson and Marv Winslow. 
Thomas Coggeshall and Esther Kinnion. 
James Hamblin and Hannah Wilkah. 
William Bell and Sarah Thurston. 
William Lay and Sarah Sinnet. 

William Dykes and Elizabeth Allison. 

Joseph Nabb and Elizabeth Riley. 

Robert Babcock and Elizabeth Sibbins. 

Daniel Beeby and Lydia Stanton. 

William Billings and Pheb}'^ Borden. 

Thomas Earle and Mary Tripp. 

Robert Sims and Ruth Philips. 

John Stanton and Mary Wetters. 

Edmund Bell and Martha Howel. 

Goodman Hallyorson and Lucina Lowden. 

Peter Marshall and Mary Bennet. 

Robert Shoul and Mary Golden. 

Henry Freeborn, Newport, and Nancy Peckham, 
Middletown. 

Job Cook and Freelove Gubbins. 

Henry Collard and Abigail Baxter. 

Frances Basset and Nancy Hicks. 

David Tabor and Ann Briggs. 

Daniel Hudson and Ann Creapon. 

Benjamin Marshall and Elizabeth Read. 

John Rider and Pheby Fowler. 

Peleg Manchester, Portsmouth, and Hannah Wil- 
cox, Middletown. 

5. Henry Jackways and Catharine Seargeant. 

(To be continued.) 



Oct. 


14. 


a 


16. 


i. 


16. 


;( 


16. 


a 


31. 


Nov. 


6. 


a. 


13. 


ii. 


27. 


Dec. 


7. 


C( 


15. 


u 


20. 


1767. 




Jan. 


8. 


Feb. 


1. 


a 


5. 


April 26. 


May 


3. 


ii. 


14. 


June 


4. 


ki 


4. 


a 


4. 


i(. 


11. 


a 


21. 


July 


5. 


a 


9. 


(; 


12. 


u 


14. 


!,(. 


26. 


Aug. 


9. 


hC 


16. 


i; 


31. 


Sept, 


. 24. 


Oct. 


1. 



(( 



]V[agazine ofJ\(ew 2nglandJ{istory 

Vol 1. . July, 1891. ' No: 3. 

Some Descendants of John Pearce [Mason] of 

Portsmouth, R. L 




By Gen. T. L. Casey. 

HERE is a tradition in tliis family that the earliest 
settler in this country was named John, and that he 
came, about 1660, from Wales. 
In the proceedings of the town meeting, held in 
Portsmouth, R. I., July 5, 1666, is the following record: 

"John Pearce, admitted this day, a free inhabitant of this 
town." 

He may have been one of the Baptist congregation of John 
Myles of Swansea, Wales, Avho were persecuted from Wales 
to Rehoboth, 1662-3, and from thence to Swanzey, Plymouth 
Colony, 1666-7. In his testimony given May 7, 1673, as to 
the death of Mrs. Rebecca Cornell, he calls himself 41 years 
of age. So that he was born in 1632. His trade was that of 
a mason, but he was not identified by that designation until 
John Pearce, son of Richard, had come of age, in 1668, and 
there Were two of the name, John Pearce, inhabitants of the 
town. 

April 14, 1668, John Pearce (Mason) bought a dwelling 
house and 38 acres of land of William Corry (Corey). 

Sept. 29, 1668, John Pearce (Mason) took a lease of Wil- 
liam Corey of 68 acres for a period of seven years. 



130 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

May 4, 1G75, John Pearce (Mason) was made a freeman 
of tlie Colony, from Portsmouth. 

Oct. 31, 1677, John Pearce (Mason) was included by the 

General Assembly in the list of grantees of the lands at East 

Greenwich. 

June 12, 1678, John Pearce (Mason) was allowed by the 

General Assembly to dispose of his East Greenwich rights, 

to Henry Matthewson. 

March 16, 1685, John Pearce (Mason) and John Pearce 

(probably his eldest son John) drawn on jury of "Tryall's" 

at Newport. 

After John Pearce, son of Richard, went to Pocassett or 

Tiverton, about 1683, John Pearce (Mason) seems in Ports- 
mouth to have been styled John Pearce, Senior. 

March 5, 1686, John Pearce, Senior, a member of a coro- 
ner's inquest, held at the house of James Sweet, Jr., on 
Prudence Island. 

Feb. 23, 1691, Maj. John Greene, deeds land in Natick to 
"John Pearce (Mason) inhabitant in Prudence Island." 

Aug. 20, 1691, John Pearce and Mary, his wife, deed this 
land to their loving son Daniel. 

John Pearce, Senior, made his will, Sept. 23, 1689, and it 
was proved in Portsmouth, April 26, 1692. In this will he 
styles himself John Perce, Senior,of Prudence Island, makes 
his wife, Mary, sole executrix, and residuary legatee, after 
dividing small legacies to his three chiklren, namely, John 
Pearce, Jr., Daniel Pearce, and Mary Hill, wife of Robert Hill. 
The widow Mary Pearce made her will Sept. 17, 1711, which 
was proved Oct. 15, 1711, in which she leaves first "40 shill- 
ings to the poor brethren of the Church of Christ to whom I 
doe belong." Then she divides the remainder between her 
three children, John Pearce, Daniel Pearce, and Mary Sweet. 
The children of John Pearce (Mason) and Mary his wife as 
far as known were.* 

I. John^, b. about 1658. 

II. DanieP, b. about 1662. 

III. Mary2, b. about 1666. 



MAGAZINE OF NE\y ENGLAND HISTOKY. 131 

JoHN^ Pearce (John^^ was born about 1658 and died 
about 1737. His residence was on Prudence Island. He 
married Martha, eldest daughter of Francis and Mary Bray- 
ton of Portsmouth. 

June 6, 1692, He was made a freeman. 

1694 and 1704, He was constable. 

Oct. 10, 1696, He paid 16 shillings for 8 acres of land 
allotted him by the town, July 23, 1694. 

Prior to 1705 John Pearce and Daniel Pearce were arrest- 
ed and imprisoned in Connecticut for religious difference of 
belief. In their company was one John Moss (Morse?)* 

Dec. 5, 1715, He deeded to son Preserved half a farm in 
Warwick in part called Natick, "that honored father John 
Pearce deceased bought of Major John Greene (half being 
given me in will of father, and half given my brother Dan- 
iel.") 

His children as far as known were: 
I. Johu'^ Jr., b. about 1682. 
II. Francis'^ h. about 1684. 
III. Preserved''^, b. about 1686. 

Preserved'^ Pearce (Jo/m^ JoA?*^) was born about 1686 
and was made a freeman for Warwick 1711. Subsequently . 
he was made a freeman of Portsuiouth in 1724, and after this 
he moved to East Greenwicli. Died after 1769. He had 
the following children, probabl}^ others: 

I. Abigail* b. m. in North Kingstown, Nov. 4, 1786, 

Thomas Hill of Jonathan. He was born 1692. 

II. Nathaniels b. m. May 22, 1735, Sarah Wickes 

of Thomas and Ann of Warwick. She was born 
March 18, 1708. Had 

1. Ichabod''' b. Oct. 8, 1735, })rol)ably others. 

HI. Thomas^ b. m. Sept. 13, 1739, Jane Dickinson 

of Richard. Had 

1. George^ b. Jan. 27, 1739. 

2. Christopher^, b. Feb. 16 1742. 

*See Vol. III. R. I. Colonial Records p. 546. 



132 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

3. Charles^, b. May 18, 1744. 

4. Mary^ b. April 10, 1747. 

IV. Preserved^ b. m. (1) Sarah, whod. Dec. 13, 

1744, m. (2) March 9, 1745, Alice Spencer of 
Abnerand Susannah. Alice was b. Oct. 8, 1719. 

Had by 1st. wife: 

1. Sarah^ b. Oct. 13, 1744, m. April 14, 1768, 
Capt. Thomas Arnold of William and 
Phebe. He was b. Oct. 26, 1740. 

Had by 2d wife: 

2. Susannah^ b. Sept. 5, 1746, m. Feb. 23, 
1760, Caleb Mathews of Jeremiah,of Reho- 
both, Mass. 

3. Hannah^ b. Aug. 31 

4. Johns b. July 7, 1756. 

5. ^MaryS b. — m. March 2, 1775, John 

Singer Dexter, of Cumberland, R. I. 

6. Preserved^ k , m. Dec. 3, 1790, 

Sarah Dexter of Warwick. 

Daniel^ Pearce (Joh'n}) was born about 1662, and there 
is reason to believe did not die until after 1744. Few family 
records can be found of him, and the names of his children 
given have been recovered from deeds and other legal papers. 
The records of his public services are quite full,and cover the 
period from 1694 to 1731. He was made freeman of the 
town of Portsmouth, June 6, 1692. He was twice married, 
but the name of his first wife is unknown. He married (2) 
Dec. 13, 1703, Elizabeth Tucker of Prudence Island. He re- 
sided in Portsmouth up to 1720, and for two years following 
was more or less at Kingston, but took up a permanent 
residence in N. Kingstown the summer of 1723. 
1694-5-7, he was Constable in Portsmouth. 
1698, 1701-5-10-11-20-21-23-31, he was a deputy to General 

Assembly from Portsmouth. 
1700, Daniel Pearce, Senior, of Prudence Island, bought of 
Benjamin and Jonathan Viall and John Thomas of 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 133 

Swanzey, 760 acres of land at Aquidnesitt. 
1707-8-11-20, He was a Justice of the Peace in Portsmouth. 

1720, He was a grand juryman and deputy for Kingston. 

1721, He and his wife conveyed by deed of gift to his two 
sons, Daniel Pearce, Jr., and John Pearce of Portsmouth, 
in common, 400 acres of land at Aquidnesit. 

July 8, 1722, Daniel Pearce of Kingston sold to his son 

and daughter, Ephraim Smith a mulatto man. 
March 17, 1723, Daniel Pearce Jr.^ and wife Patience, and 

John Pearce and wife Martha, sell to their honored 

farther, Daniel Pearce of Kingston, 400 acres of land 

conveyed to them in 1721. 

1724, He was a grand juryman and overseer of the poor in 
North Kingstown. 

Aug. 11, 1724, Daniel Pearce of N. Kingstown, executed a 
free deed of gift to the town, of land for a road from 
Fones Bridge to the sea, for a drift way for public use. 

March 16, 1726, Daniel Pearce of N. Kingstown, and Eliza- 
beth, sold lands to sons Daniel and John of Prudence 

Island. 
March 17, 1726, Daniel and John Pearce gave a bond to 

their brothers, Nathan and William Pearce, that they 
would give them a part of their father's estate when they 
came of age. 
Nov. 13, 1736, Daniel Pearce, before the town council of 
North Kingstown, agreed to bring a certificate from Ports- 
mouth concerning his daughter and her two children. 
(This was his daughter Mary.) 
Children by 1st wife: 

I. DanieP Jr., b. probably 1687. 
H. Margaret'^ born probably 1689. 
HI. John^ born probably 1691. 
IV. Mary^ boi'n probably 1693, m. 1715, John Moss, and 

had John* Moss and Joshua* Moss. 
Children by 2d wife: 
V. Benonis born prob. 1704, m. Nov. 10, 1723, Sarah 
Rhodes of Noth Kingstown and died Nov. 20,1724, 



134 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

8. p. Letters of administration granted his brotli 

ers Daniel and John, Dec. 8, 1724. His widow ra 

(2) Kov. % 1725, William Havens of Thoma 

and had Rhodes. 

VI. Nathan^ b. 1706, d. in Dutchess Co., N. Y., March 15 

1790, age 84 years. 

Vil. William^ b. prob. 1709, moved from Prudence Islani 

to N. Kingstown with his parents, subsequentb 

went to Canterbury, Conn., March 21 1737. Wi] 

liam Pearce, late of N. Kingstown, Colony o 

Rhode Island, now of Canterbury, Colony o 

Conn., sold lands in N. Kingstown to Isaac Cleve 

land. He probably moved to Providence, R. I. 

1737 to 1740. Aug. 21, 1740, William Pearci 

was allowed by General Assembly certain ac 

counts for transporting Capt. William Hopkin'i 

Company to Newport. April 3, 1745 was madi 

a freeman of Colony from Providence. May 5 

1747, Took oath in Providence against briber} 

and corruption. Children not known, but maj 

have had Jahez^^ who took oath in Providence 

April 30, 1754. 

Daniel^ Pearce Jr. (^DanieP, John^) was born probabb 

1687. He was made a freeman of the town of Portsmouth 

June 6, 1715 and resided on Prudence Island. February 172^ 

he was made a freeman of the Colony from Portsmouth. H( 

was married October, 1705 to Patience Hill of Jonathan o 

Prudence Island, his father performing the ceremony. Afte: 

1737 he seems to have lived in N. Kingstown, died probabl} 

about 1758. 

Feb. 1727, Daniel Pearce Jr., and Prudence his wife, oi 

Prudence Island, sold lands in N. Kingstown to Johr 

Pearce of Prudence Island. 

-Feb. 1727, he sold lands in N. Kingstown to Nathan Pearce 

for the sum of £1,000. 
1,732-8, Daniel Pearce Jr., deputy to General Assembly fo 

■Portsmouth. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 135 

Lug. 30, 1737, he was petit juryman for Portsmouth. 

Lpril 17, 1738, Daniel Pearce Jr., of North Kingstown deeded 

to his son Daniel Pearce, Glazier, 80 acres of land in 

North Kingstown. -^ 

an. 1739, Daniel Pearce Jr., of N. Kingstown sold land to 

Nathaniel Pearce of N. Kingstown, bounded easterly on 
land of Daniel Pearce 3d. 
une 26, 1744, Daniel Pearce Jr., and Nathaniel Pearce as- 
sisted in taking inventory of estate of John^ Pearce of 
Prudence Island. 
Had children. 

I. Sarah^ b. March 6, 1710. 
II. Nathaniel* b. January 20, 1715. 

III. Daniel* Sd b. Oct. 22,1717. 

IV. Jonathan* b. April 6, 1719, resided in Portsmouth, 

was a freeman of the Colony, May 3, 1743. May 
5, 1747, took oath in Portsmouth against bribery 
and corruption. April 30, 1752, and again Oct. 
1753 took inventories in Portsmouth. Oct. 9, 
1758 give bond as guardian of money belonging 
to his nieces and nephews, children of his brother 
Nathaniel*. July 9, 1761 he was put under 
guardianship himself, being "non compos mentis." 
V. Deliverance* b. Sept. 20, 1720, m. 1739, Elisha Till- 

inghast of Philip. He was b. Aug. 29, 1716. 
VI. Thomas* b. May 31, 1723, m. 1748 Martha* Pearce, 
his first cousin and dauoliter of John^ and Martha 
Pearce. He lived in Portsmouth and d. April 
30, 1752. 

VII. William* b. May 8, 1725, m. Jan. 5, 1756, Meribah 

Pearce late widow of Nathaniel* Pearce of Ports- 
mouth, deceased. This was his brother Nathan- 
iel's widow. He lived in Portsmouth. 

VIII. Patience* b. Nov. 21, 1728, m. a Mr. Wall. 

IX. Ebenezer* b. Feb. 17, 1731, Ebenezer Pearce of N. 
Kingstown, by census of 1774, had 3 persons in 
family over 16 and 4 under 16. 



136 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Nathaniel* Pearce (^DmiieP, DanieP, John}) was borr 
January 20, 1715, and was a freeman of the Colony from N 

Kingstown, May 4, 1736. He m. prob. in 1742, Meribah 

and died June 7, 1750. Inventory of his personal estat( 

amounted to over <£ 4,000. Widow administered June 18 

1752, His widow m. (2) Jan. 5, 1756, William* Pearce 

brother of her first husband. Nathaniel* must have movec 

to Portsmouth before June 26, 1744, at which time he assis 

ted in taking the inventory of the estate of his uncle Johr 

Pearce in that town. October 9, 1758, his brother Jonathan' 

Pearce gave bonds for money belonging to children of Na 

thaniel* Pearce deceased, namely "Caleb Pearce, Saral 

Pearce and Nathaniel Pearce." (sic.) 

Children. 

I. Elizabeth^ b. Oct. 14, 1743, chose her guardiar 

March 13, 1758. July 12, 1762, acknowledged tc 

have received all her legacy. 

II. Caleb^ b. Dec. 27, 1745, chose his guardian July 14 

1760, being 14 years and upwards, and mad( 

choice of Samuel* Pearce. His estate was X397 

17s-4d. He subsequently married about 1769 

Dorcas^ Pearce of Samuel*. She was his 2t 

cousin. He died shortly after his marriage, anc 

from taking cold after an attack of small pox 

His widow married (2) Capt. George Allen o: 

Prudence Island. Had 

1. Nathaniel b. Dec. 5, 1770. 

III. Sarah^ b. Aug. 27, 1747. In Warren, Jan. 27, 1766, 

she acknowledged the receipt of <£2l9-8s the por- 
tion left her by her father. 

IV. Johns b. Feb. 15, 1749. 

V. Nathaniel^ b, probably 1751, after his father's death 
The name is here recorded,upon the statement oi 

bond of Jonathan* Pearce above quoted. 

Daniel* Pearce, 3d {Daniel^ Daniel^ John^), was borr 

October 22, 1717. He was a Glazier and was made a free 

man of North Kingstown and of the colony in 1738. He 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 137 

married Mary , and his children are recorded in East 

Greenwich, where his name is spelled "Pierce." 
Children : 

I. Sarah^ b. Oct. 9, 1743. 
II. Lawrence Southcotte^ b. April 12, 1745, in East 
Greenwich. Census of 1774 records him in North 
Kingstown, and as having two sons under 16. 

III. Daniel^ b. Aug. 19, 1746, in East Greenwich, d. 

young. 

IV. Langworthy^, b. Dec. 12, 1747, in Warwick, m. and 

in census of 1774 was of North Kingstown, and 
had one son and two daughters under 16. Had 

1, John R^ b. 2, Bowen^ b. who had son 

DanieF, born 1793, and resided in Central Falls, 
R. I., and had son Daniel^. 
V. Jonathan^ b. Sept. 6, 1749, on Prudence Island, d. 

young. 
VI. James^, b. March 17, 1751, on Prudence Island. 
VII. Mary^ b. April 25, 1753, on Prudence Island. 
VIII. Deliverance^ b. March 12, 1755, on Prudence 
Island, m. Sept. 24, 1780, John Spragiie of 
Rowland. 
IX. John^, b. Oct. 4, 1756, on Prudence Island. 
X. Jonathan^, b. July 3, 1758, in South Kingstown. 
XI. Eleanor^, b. Feb. 20, 1760, in North Kingstown, m. 

Sept. 1, 1782, Samuel Rice of Peleg. 
XII. DanieP, b. Jan. 1, 1763, in South Kingstown. 
James^ Pearce {Daniel'^ 3d^ Daniel^, DanitP^ JoJin^')^ was 
born March 17, 1751, on Prudence Island, and married Nov. 
7, 1773, Mary (Grossman of South Kingstown. 
Children : 

I. Daniel^ b. Jan. 25, 1774, in South Kingstown, and 
m. June 21, 1797, Elizabeth Mott of Joseph. 
II. Thomas Hazard^, b. July 21, 1776, in South Kings- 
town. 

III. James Leonard*^, b. Sept. 2, 1778, in South Kings- 
town. 



138 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Jonathan^ Pearce (^Baniel^ 3d, Daniel^, Daniel^ John^) 
was born July 3, 1758, in South Kingstown, and m. Sept. 1 
1782, Elizabeth Coggeshall of Benjamin and Sarah 
(^AnthouT/) . 

Children : 

I. George^, b. Jan. 31, 1783. 
IT. Mary6, b. Nov. 24, 1784. 

TVT . . R r) . ( Oaleb^, Nathaniel\ Daniel^. Dan- 

NATHANIEL^ PeARCE \ t. \ a 74 V 7 q 

( JJorcas^, tSamuel% Jonrv^, 

1 p 1 tJ o h'y) I 

' [ was born on Prudence Island Dec. 5, 1770. He 

followed the coasting business and settled in Providence, 
where he died Dec. 26, 1851. He m. Dec. 1, 1791, Sarah 
Stoddard, of Providence. She was b. March 10, 1771, and 
d. Feb. 19, 1855. 
Children : 

I. Thomas^, b. Sept. 14, 1792. 
11. William H.^, b. Nov. 23, 1798. d. Jan. 10, 1889. 

Never married. 
HI. George^ b. Nov. 16, 1799, d. April SO, 1812. Never 

married. 
IV. Sarah A.s b. May 26, 1802, d. Jan. 25, 1807. 
V. Edward^, b. May 27, 1804. 
VI. Sarah7, b. March 20, 1807. d. Sept. 15, 1886. m. 

Dec. 11, 1827, William P. Bullock. 
VII. CharlesS b. Feb. 17, 1809. d. March 1809. 
Thomas^ Pearce (^Nathaniel^, Caleh^, Nathaniel"^, Daniel^'- 
Daniel% John^) was born Sept. 14, 1792 and died Feb. 17, 
1854. m. Mary Ann Cheppalier who d. March 12, 1884. 
Children : 

I. Adeline Cheppalier^, b. 

II. Sophie Cordelia^, b. 

III. Mary Ann Jennings^, b. ~. m. Benjamin 

Tripp, of Providence. 

IV. Sarah Louisa^, b. . d. Jan. 21, 1875. 

V. Thomas Nathaniel, b. 1833, d. Feb. 25, 1885, in 

the 53d year of his age. 



MAGAZIIS'E OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 139 

VI. James Sturgis^, b. 



VII. Katherine Wheaton^, b. 
VIII. Samuel Wheaton^ b. 



IX. Clemantine Cheppalier^, b. 

Edward" Pearcb {NathanieW^ Caleh^^ Nathaniel'^^ DanieP^ 
Daniel^ John^) was b. May 27, 1804, and d. Jan. 1, 1881. He 
m. Oct. 24, 1827, Harriet Bullock, who d. Oct. 2, 1883. 
Children : 

I. Richmond Bullock^, b. July 17, 1828, d. Jan. 28, 
1829. 
II. Catherine Comstock^, b. March 18, 1830, d. Oct. 
12, 1880. 

III. William HenryS, b. July 30, 1831, d. March 7, 1832. 

IV. Edward^, b. July 21, 1833. 

V. William Bullock^, b. May 14, 1835. 
VI. Ellen Richmond^, b. May 25, 1837, d. Nov. 29, 1862. 
VII. Henry«, b. April 21, 1839. 

VIII. Julia Bullock^ b. Aug. 19, 1841, m. March 7, 1866, 
Alexander H. Davis, and d. Dec. 14, 1866. 
Makgarf]t3 Pearce (Daniel'^, John^), was born about 
1689 and m. (1) 1710 Epliraim Smith, of Jeremiah and Mary 
(^Gereaidy) Smith. He was b. probably 1680 and d. Oct. 
1722. She m. (2) January 4, 1725, Immanuel Clark of 
Benjamin and Mercy (Smith) Chirk. He was b. April 4, 
1697. 

Had by Smith : 

I. Freelove^ Smith, b. July 24, 1711. m. Allen. 

II. Sarah* Smith, b. Oct. 4, 1714. 

HI. Renewed* Smith, b. May 8, 1717, m. 1733 Daniel 
Carpenter of Solomon and Elizabeth (^Tefft). He 
was b. Dec. 28, 1712. 
IV. Margaret* Smith, b. May 4, 1719. May 14, 1733, 
chose her uncle, DanieF Pearce, of Prudence 
Island, as her guardian. 
V. Ephraim* Smith, b. April 13, 1722, m. Feb. 7, 1741, 

Boone of North Kingstown. 

Had by Clark : 



140 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

VI. Benjamin^ Clark, b. July 12, 1728. 

JoHN^ Pearce (^BanieP^ John})^ of Prudence Island, was 
a farmer and was born about 1691. He was married about 
1718 to Martha Sweet. He was made a freeman of the town 
of Portsmouth June 6, 1720, and of the Colony Feb. 1724. 
His will was dated Feb. 7, 1744, and was proved July 9, 
1744. The inventory of his personal estate, amounting to 
X 4858-12-1 and including nine negroes, was taken June 26, 
1744, by Daniel Pearce Jr. his brother, Nathaniel Pearce his 
nephew, James Sweet and Gideon Freeborn Jr. He died 
June 22, 1744. No wife was named in the will, and 
she must have died before him. 

February, 1727, division deeds executed by Daniel and 
Patience Pearce and John and Martha Pearce were 
made of lands in North Kingstown. 

His children named in his will were: 
I. Samuel*, b. 1719, d. Sept. 4, 1816, aged 97 years. 
II. John*, b. probably 1722. 

III. Thomas*, b. probably 1726, d. at sea] Oct. 16, 1753. 

The inventory of his estate amounted to 
X229-15s. s.p. 

IV. Sarah*, b. probably 1728. On April 28, and June 9, 

1746, receipted to her brothers Samuel and John 

Pearce, executors, for her legacy amounting to 

X370-13s-7d. 
V. Martha*, b. probably 1731. Receipted Oct. 28, 1747, 

at Prudence Island, to John Pearce, for part of 
her legacy. Sept. 29, 1749, Thomas Pearce re- 
ceipted for part of his wife's legacy. She was m. 
probably 1748 to Thomas* Pearce of DanieF Jr. 
He died April 30, 1752 and his widow was made 
administratrix of his estate, amounting to 

X488-0-6d. 
VI. Michael*, b. probably 1734. He receipted Jan. 29, 

,1755, at Scituate, R. I., to Samuel and John 

Pearce, executors, for his full share of his father's 

estate, being X 342-13-6. The witness to this 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 141 

receipt was Natlian Pearce, to me unknown. Jan. 
6, 1779, Jabez Bradley, of Tolland, Conn., con- 
veyed a piece of land to Michael Pearce. 
Samuel* Pearce, Esq., {John^, DanieV-^ John^), of Pru- 
dence Island, was born 1719, and was made a freeman 
of the Colony from Portsmouth May 4, 1742. He m. June 
29, 1744, in Providence, R. I., Esther Wiley of John and 
Dorcas ( Greeri) Wiley ^ of Windham Co., Ct., and formerly 
of Lynn, Mass. He died intestate Sept. 4, 1816, aged 97. 
He occupied a large farm at the northern end of Prudence 
Island until January, 1776, when he was driven off the 
Island by Capt. Wallace of the British armed vessels, who 
burned every house on the Island. He took refuge in War- 
wick and moved to Tolland, Conn., the same year, but 
returned to Prudence Island after the War. His wife was 
born 1721 and died Dec. 19, 1778, in Tolland, where she was 
buried. 
Children : 

I. Jolm^ b. April 11, 1745, died at sea. s. p. 
II. Martha^ b. Jan. 5, 1747, m. Feb. 10, 1763, James 
Allen of John, and moved to Amsterdam, Mont- 
gomery Co., New York. 

III. Sarah% b. July 14, 1749, m. Chase. 

IV. Dorcas^, b. Oct. 16, 1750, m. (1) Caleb^ Pearce of 

Nathaniel'^ and Meribah. m. (2) Capt. George 
Allen, of Prudence Island. 
y. Samuel^ Jr., b. April 18, 1752. 

VI. Esther^ b. Jan. 20, 1754, never married, d. in 1828. 
VH. Thomas^ b. Jan. 8, 1756, m. Oct. 10, 1779, Martha 
Jerauld of Dr. Dutee and Freelove ( Q-orton) 
Jerauld of Warwick. He d. about 1788. Was En- 
sign in Capt. Thomas Allen's Co. Dec. 1776. He 
is believed to have had the following children at 

least: 

1, Caleb^ b. about 1780, m. in Warwick, R. I. 

June 23, 1803 to Susannah Bray ton, of 

Daniel and Elizabeth. She was born May 



142 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

30, 1784. Children: 1, Hannah^ b. Oct. ' 

1803; 2, DankF b. May 23,1808; 3, Rut] 

b. Sept. 22, 1810, d. Sept. 16, 1813; - 

Mary Russell^, b. April 8, 1813; 5, Claris^ 

Brayton^, b. March 11, 1815; 6, Susan^, i 

June 8, 1817. 

2. Samuel Willey^, b. Sept. 12, 1788. 
VII 1. Michael^ b. Oct. 9, 1756, m. Sarah Allen and move 

to Middlesex, Yates Co., New York. Probabl 

went to Tolland with his father in 1776. 

IX. Lucy^ b. , m. a Mr. Walcott and moved to "th 

Geneseo," New York. 
X. Julianna^, b. , m. a Mr. Grant of Tolland, Ct. 

Samuel^ Pearce. Jr, (Samuel\ John^^ Daniel^ John?-] 
was born April 13, 1752, on Prudence Island, and died inte; 
tate Dec. 7, 1827. On that day Parois Douglass and Danie 
Weeden, of Prudence Island, were appointed custodians c 
his personal property, and January 14, 1828, were grante 
letters of administration on his estate. Aug. 1775, he wa 
Captain of the 2d Company of Militia in Portsmouth. Jar 
uary, 1776, he was driven from Prudence Island to Warwic' 
by the British forces. He m. (1) Dec. 22, 1776, Hanna 
Jerauld of Dr. Dutee and Freelove ( G-orton) Jerauld of Wai 
wick, and probably resided in Warwick until 1778. Mara 
4, 1778, Jabez Bradley, of Tolland, Ct., conveyed 200 acre 
of land in Tolland to Samuel Pearce and Samuel Pearce, Jr. 
of Portsmouth, E. 1. Hannah Jerauld was born Dec. 21 
1753, and died Nov. 1801. He m. (2) Sept. 22, 1803, Han 
nah Easton of Nicholas and Hannah. She was born 177. 
and died Feb. 3, 1821. June 4, 1788, the Ear-mark o 
Samuel Pearce, Jr., was recorded in Portsmouth, R. I. Ma; 
9, 1808, he was granted letters of administration on the estat 
of his son Jerauld, The inventor}^ returned Jan. 9, 1809 
amounted to 8339.63. 

Children b}^ first wife : 

I. Sarah^, b. in Warwick Aug. 2, 1777, d. in Tolland 
Ct., July, 1779. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 143 

IT. John Wiley^, b. in Tolland, Oct. 11, 1779, lost at sea 
about 1800, 

III. Samuel^ b. , d. young. 

IV. JeraukF, b. , d. on the coast of Africa the latter 

part of 1807, aged about 23. s. p. 
V. William Tibbitts^, b. Feb. 9, 1785, d. March 5, 1862. 
S. P. m. (1) Elizabeth Maxwell, b. 1789 and d. 
April 25, 1835. m. (2) Oct. 9, 1837, Abby Max- 
well, b. 1793 and d. April 14, 1863. Both 
daughters of Cyril and Abby Maxwell, of Bristol, 
R.I. 

VI. Ann6, b. Nov. 2, 1786, d. Nov. 4, 1874, m. Nov. 26, 
1806, Solomon Townsend, of Newport, of John 
and Philadelphia (Feke). He was b. May 22, 
1776, and d. Feb. 2, 1821. 
VII. Dutee Jerauld^ b. April 2, 1789. 

Hon. Dutee Jerauld^ Pearce (Samuel Jr^, Samuel"^, 
John^^ DanieP, John^) was born on Prudence Island* 
April 2; 1789, and d. in Newport, May 9, 1849. He gradu- 
ated with much honor at Brown University in 1808, and 
after completing his study of law, began the practice of his 
profession in Newport where he resided until his death, 
Was United States attorney for the District of Rhode Island; 
Attorney General of Rhode Island from 1819 to 1825; a 
presidential elector on the Monroe ticket in 1821; for several 
years a member of the State House of Representatives, and 
was elected a Representative from Rhode Island to the XIX, 
XX, XXI, XXII, XXIII and XXIV Congresses, serving 
from Dec. 5, 1825 to March 3, 1837. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Committee on Naval affairs while in the House. 
He m. (1) April 3, 1811, Abigail Coggeshall Perry of Capt. 
James and Abigail ( CoggeshaW) of Newport. She was born 
Feb. 9, 1793 and d. July 4, 1827, m. (2), Dec. 2, 1829, Har- 
riet Boss, of John Linscom and Sarah (Boss). She was b. 
July 12, 1797, and d. Nov. 21, 1887, in Newport, R. I. 

Children by 1st. wife: 



144 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

I. Hannah Jerauld^ b. Jan. 3, 1812, d. March 8, 1865 
m. October 21, 1845, Rev. Samuel Grosvenor oi 
Lemuel, s. p. 
II. Abby Perry7 b. July 12, 1813, d. March 10, 1862, 
m. July 12, 1830, Gen. Silas Casey, U. S. army, 
son of Wanton and Elizabeth ( Goodale) of East 
Greenwich, R. I. He was b. July 12, 1807, and d, 
Jan. 22, 1882. 

HI. Ann Townsend^ b. May 15, 1815, d. Dec. 13, 1853 
never married. 

IV. Catherine Perry^ b. March 3, 1816, m. Oct. 6, 1840 
Rev. William Robinson Babcock, of Rowse anc 
Hannah (^Brown) of Westerly, R. I. He was b 
March 28, 1814, and ordained priest in the 
Protestant Episcopal Church; 1841. 
V. SamueF b. Aug. 17, 1818, entered U. S. Navy as 
Midshipman, March 30, 1833. Passed Midship 
man, July 8, 1839. Captain on Retired List, Apri 
4, 1867, d. March 29, 1874. 

VI. Dutee Jerauld^ b June 21, 1820, d. Aug. 11, 182S. 

Children by 2d. wife: 
VII. Dutee Jerauld^ b. July 27, 1833. 
VIII. Harriet Boss^ b. Jan. 5, 1836, m. May 27, 1858, Wil 
liam Easton Bailey of Joseph Irish and Mar^ 
Hopkins QStantori) of Newport. He was born 
Nov. 2, 1834. 

Dutee Jerauld' Pearce (Butee Jerauld^, Samuel Jr.' 
Samuel\ John^ Daniel'^ J oh'n}) was born July 27, 1833, and m 
June 11, 1862, Martha Palmer of Stephen James and Martha 
(^Hawkins) Palmer of South Kingstown, R. I. She was b 
November 15, 1842. 
Children: 

I. Dutee Jerauld^ b. August 11, 1864. 
II. Catherine Bibcock^ b. May 19, 18701' 

III. Harriet Boss^ b. March 31, 1875. 

IV. Candace Elliot^ b. April 28, 1877. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 145 

John* Pearce {John^^ Daniel^ John^~) was born on Pru. 

ence Island probably 1722 and m. 1746, Sarah . He 

k^as executor with his brother Samuel* of the estate of their 
ather. He moved from Prudence Island to Scituate, R. I., 
lay 13,1756. His Ear-mark was recorded in Scituate,May 13^ 
856. October 23, 1778, Jabez Bradley of Tolland, Conn., 
onveyed a piece of land to John Pearce of Scituate, R. I. 

Children : 

I. Sarah^b. Aug. 17,1747, on Prudence Island, m. Dec. 

2, 1766, Jeriah Hopkins of Scituate. 
II. Martha^ b. Jan. 23, 1749 in Scituate. 

HI. Avis^ b. Dec. 17, 1750 in Scituate, m. July 25, 1770, 
Roy all Hopkins. 

IV. Levi^ b. April 24, 1758, in Scituate. 
V. Thomas^ b. April 30, 1755, in Scituate. 

VI. Nathaniel^ prob. who m. Jan. 3, 1782, Nancy 

Thomas, both of Scituate. 

Nathan^ Pearce {DanieP John^) was born 1706, and d. 

n Dutchess Co., N. Y., March 15, 1790, ae 84. He probably 

vent with his father to N. Kingstown in 1723, and m. Oct. 5, 

.724, Abigail Spink of N. Kingstown, Avho was b. 1704, and 

I. July 7, 1761 ae 87. He was a celebrated land Surveyor 

;nd marked the line between N. Kingstown and East Green- 

vich. He was a deacon in the Baptist (Church, and a Justice 

)f the Peace, so that he is sometimes styled Rev. Nathan 

^earce, Esq. He resided in N. Kingstown up to 1735, then 

)n Prudence Island until 1742, and then in Providence until 

he Spring of 1760, when he moved to Pawling,Dutchiss Co., 

^ew York, with all bis sons but Benoni, and most of his 

laughters. April 3, 1745, he was made a freeman of the col- 

)ny from Providence. May 1, 1750 he took the oath against 

nibery and corruption, in Providence. July 17, 1760 in 

rohnstown,Montgomery Co., N. Y., he made a deposition con- 

;erning the will of Cary Clark, of North Kingstown. 1778 

le was the first Supervisor of the town of Pawling, Dutchess 
:!o., N. Y. j> 
Children: 



14G MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

I. Sai'ali* b. Aug. 19, 1725 in N. Kingstown, m. Aug. i 
1748, Thomas Kilton Jr., of Thomas and Pheb 
(^Dexter^. 

IT. Abigail^ b. July 10, 1727 in N. Kingstown. 

III. Benoni^ b. Nov. 23, 1730 in N. Kingstown. 

IV. Ephraim^ b. March 15, 1733 in N. Kingstown, d. i 

Dutchess Co., N. Y., March 28, 1816. He wa 
twice married, name of 1st wife unknown. Th 
2d wife was a widow Buck. Had children: 1 
Joseph^ who moved to Otsego, N. Y., 2, Anna' 
who m. John Bemont, 3, SamueP, who m. Jun 
20, 1791, Martha^ Pearce of Benoni*, and move^ 
to Fayettville, N. Carolina, 4, Mehitable^, who n: 
Latham. 

V. Susanna* b. April 27, 1736 on Prudence Island. 
VI. Margaret* b. Oct. 7, 1738, on Prudence Island, n 
William Potter, who was killed by a falling lim 
of a tree. She d. in Pawling, Sept. 23, 1778. 
VII. Nathan* b. Jan. 19, 1740 on Prudence Island, an( 
was brutally whipped to death by Tories in Ne^ 
York, in 1778. Had children 1, Daniel^ who m 
Feb. 9, 1794, Anstis^ Pearce of Benoni*, ^ 
Charles^ 3, Robert^ 4,NathanSm. March 17, 179^ 
Clarissa Phelps, 5, Susan^ m. as his 2d wife, Capt 
James Stark of Dover, Dutchess Co., N. Y. 
VIII. Phebe* b. May 25, 1 743, in Providence and d. Ma; 
5, 1822, m. Charles Dyer of Charles and Abigai 
( Williams) Dyer of Providence. 
IX. William* b. Sept. 12, 1745, in Providence. 

Benoni* Pearce {JSFathan^ Daniel^ Joh'n}) was born ii 
North Kingstown, Nov. 23, 1730, and is said to have died ii 
Providence in 1820. He m. (1), in Providence, May £ 
1754, Mehitable Walker who was b- Sept. 22, 1733, m. (2) ii 
Pawling, Dutchess Co., N. Y., July 16, 1800, Ruth Tweed} 
May 5, 1752 he took oath in Providence against bribery an( 
corruption. March 23, 1762, he was director in a lottery fo 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



147 



II. 



Daving certain streets in Providence. 1769, 70, 74 and 80 he 
ivas a deputy to the General Assembly from Providence. In 
L774 he was on a committee to report to the General Assem- 
bly upon the seizure of the sloop "Two PoUies," by the 
Spaniards on the Mississippi River. He moved to Dutchess 
bounty, N. Y., after 1780, but returned to Providence, it is 
;aid, in 1807. 
Children: 

I. Sarah'^ b. Ajjril 16, 1755, m. Capt. James Stark of 
Dover, Dutchess, Co., N. Y., as his 1st wife. 

Elizabeth^ b. April 7, 1757, m. Nov. 13, 1777, Parris 
Jencks Tillinghast of Nicholas and Joanna 
(Jeneks^ who was b. March 19, 1757. They moved 
to North Carolina. 

Martha^ b. May 17, 1759, m. June 20, 1791, SamueP 
Pearce of Ephraim^ of Nathan-^ and moved to 
Fayettville, N. Carolina. 

Cyrus^ b. Nov. 30, 1761, d. Dec. 7, 17G1. 

AbigaiP b. Aug. 9, 1768, m. Dr. Benjamin Dja-e, 
Sen., of Providence, of Charles and Phebe* 
{Pearce) Dyre. 

Oliver^ b. Aug. 7, 1765, m. in Providence Mary 
West and moved to North Carolina. 

Nathan^ b. Jan. 26, 1768. 

Lydia M.^ b. May 26, 1770. 

Anstis^ b. Sept. 6, 1772, m. March 17, 1795 Daniel^ 
Pearce of Nathan*. 

John Hancock^, b. Oct. 15, 1774, moved to Fayett- 
ville, North Carolina. He m. there Fanny Echols. 



III. 



IV. 
V. 



VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 



William* Pearce {Nathan^, jDanieP, John^) was born in 
^rovidence, R. I., Sept. 12, 1745, and went with his father to 
Dutchess Co., N. Y., in 1760. Daring the Revolution he 
vas a Captain, but near its close received a Colonel's com- 
iiission. He was a Justice of the Peace 1785 to 1801, and 
lied in Pawling, N. Y., Jan. 17, 1813. He m. (1) March 2, 
1766, Chloe Cary of Rev. Henry Cary of Pawling. She was 



148 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

b. June 6, 1746 and d. Sept. 4, 1778. m. (2) Feb. 7, 1772 
Lydia Birdsall, of Pawling. She wasb. Aug. 20, 1757, an( 
d. March 2, 1813. 
Had by first wife: 

I. AbigaiP, b. Jan. 10, 1767, d. May 8, 1808. m. Dec 

1, 1755, Jethro Sherman. 
II. HenryS, b. Sept. 15, 1768, d. Feb. 8, 1835. m. Oct 
26, 1788 Rebecca Birdsall, of Pawling, and hac 
eleven children. She d. March 18, 1848, agec 
76 years, 7 months, 17 days. 

III. Benoni^ b. Jan. 6, 1771, d. Sept. 17,1846. m. Marcl 

7, 1792 Lydia Dodge- She d. July 23, 1846 
Had but one child, Nathan^, b. May 13, 1792, d 
July 31, 1882. 

IV. Mary^ b. Feb. 17, 1773, d. March 11, 18o6. m. Aug 

29, 1794 Joseph Halloway who d. Oct. 25, 1832. 
V. Oliver^, b. Feb; 28, 1775, d. Feb. 16, 1778. 
VI. William^ Jr., b. March 22, 1777, d. Sept. 4, 1778. 
Had by second wife: 

VII. William^ Jr., b. June 15, 1784, m. May 18, 1809 
Amey Dodge, and d. May 20, 1848. Moved t( 
Whitestown, near Utica, N. Y. Had thirteer 
children. Spelt his name "Peirce." 
VIII. LydiaS, b. Jan. 11, 1786, d. Oct. 14, 1881. m. Dec 
29, 1804, Jonathan Howland, who d. Oct. 12 
1841. 
IX. Nathan^, b. July 5, 1790, d. Feb. 23, 1792. 
X. Sophia^, b. Feb. 27, 1792, d. Feb. 5, 1793. 
Mary^ Pearce (Jo/m^) was born about 1666 and m. (P 
Robert Hill of Jonathan and Mary. She m. (2) James 
Sweet, Jr., of James and Mary (^Green), who was born Ma} 
8, 1657. The will of James Sweet was proved in PortS' 
mouth Dec. 13, 1725, and his widow Mary was appointee 
executrix. 

Had by first husband: 

I. Jonathan^ Hill, b. about 1686. 

II. Robert^ Hill, b. about 1688. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOBY. 149 

III. DanieF Hill, b. about 1690, m. 1710 Joanna Gar- 

diner of George and Tabitba of Narragansett. 

IV. Susanna^ Hill, b. about 1692, m. Havens. 

V. William^ Hill, b. about 1694. 

VI. John3 Hill, b. about 1696. 
VII. AbigaiP Hill, b. 1698- 

The writer of the above article would be pleased to receive 
any additions to or corrections of the data collected. 



A Few Sunday Laws of Plymouth Colony. — It was 
enacted by the Court of the Plymouth Colony, June 10, 
1650, that whosoever shall profane the Lord's-day by doing 
any servile work shall pay ten shillings or be whipped. 

In 1651, it was enacted that anyone neglecting attendance 
upon public worsliip shall pay ten shillings or be publicly 
whipped. 

In 1658, travelers by horse or on foot, bearing burdens or 
carrying packs, were fined twenty shillings, or in default 
thereof made to sit in the stocks four hours. 

In 1669, constables and their deputies were required dili- 
gently to look after such as sleep or play about the meeting- 
house in time of public worship. Also any person found 
smoking tobacco on the Lord's-day, while going to or coming 
from meeting, and within two miles from the meeting-house, 
shall pay a fine of twelve pence. 

In 1670, constables were required to search dwelling houses 
in order to find those suspected of hiding away from attend- 
ance on public worship. 



The first attem];)t of English people to make a permanent 
settlement north of the Potomac was along the lower Kenne- 
bec River in Maine. The occupancy of the river antedates 
the Plymouth Colony thirteen years and the Old Bay State 
Colony twenty-two years. With her later Colony of Ply- 
mouth the Old Bay State has asserted the prestige of this 
glorious consummation, but impartial historians of this later 
day grant precedence to the State of Maine. The earliest 
ships sailed upon her waters and the earliest settlers located 
upon her shores, 



150 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Record of Marriages, by Rev. Gardner Thurston, 

pastor of the Second Baptist Church, New- 
port, R. L 1759-1800. 



1767. 




Oct. 


20. 


(( 


21. 


Nov. 


5. 


(( 


13. 


(( 


14. 


(( 


17. 


(( 


17. 


(4 


17. 


li 


20. 


U 


22. 


a 


24. 


it 


80. 


Dec. 


4. 


u 


7. 


1768. 




Jan. 


17. 


t( 


24. 


Feb. 


15. 


a 


16. 


u 


24. 


a 


28. 


(( 


28. 


Mch. 


3. 


(( 


27. 



(Continued from page 128.) 

Richard Philips and Elizabeth Batenian. 
Aaron Fisher and Mary Lawton. 
Anthony Shaw and Waite Perry. 
John Brown and Jane West. 
Zebulon Gears and Mary Jackson. 
Jethro Briggs and Mary Card. 
Barney Wade and Patience Pearce. 
Edward Channing and Jane Cozzens. 
Isaac Carr and Phebe Carr. 
Arthur Akley and Prissilla Barker. 
Samuel Cranston and Elizabeth Chapman. 
Peter Lewake and Martha Dunwell. 
Charles Bradford and Hannah Crandall. 
Samuel Carr and Sarah Thomas. 

Fones Hazard and Rebeckah Briant. 
Michael Maxwell and Thankful Hudson. 
Peter Wells and Jemima Mott. 
Thomas Richardson and Margaret Walker. 
Robert Cartin and Freelove Wethers. 
John Kennedy and Ann Hardy. 
Anthony Askey and Edison Ross. 
Joseph Clarke and Elizabeth Hunt. 
Conrad Flagg and Barshabe Dickins, 



Mch. 


23. 


AprL 


5. 


(C 


27. 


May 


15. 


June 


5. 


u 


19. 


(( 


22. 


July 


3. 


a 


6. 


a 


6. 


Aug. 


11. 


u 


18. 


a 


18. 


Sept. 


8. 


(I 


8. 


a 


8. 


u 


14. 


Oct. 


3. 


Nov. 


6. 


u 


12. 


u 


ly. 


a 


15. 


(( 


28. 


1769. 




Jan. 


1. 


(fc 


13. 


(. 


19. 


a 


26. 


n 


31. 


Feb. 


8. 


a 


12. 


Mch. 


12. 


April 


2. 


kfc 


6. 



.MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 151 

Edward Gardner and Hannah Cory. 
Peleg Barker and Sarah Wilcox. 
Thomas Cottrell and Hannah Hopkins. 
Philip Durfy and Dimmins Gary. 
Benjamin Fairbanks and Abigail Hill, Ports- 
mouth. 
Lawrence Carroll and Susannah Holden. 
William Howland and Ann Sayer. 
Elislia Gibbs and Hannah Lawton. 
Daniel Brown and Lidia Wilcox. 
Uriah Wilber and Ann Stacey. 
John Tarrient and Amey Whritson. 
James Anthony and Elizabeth Cornell. 
John Murphy and Mary Bassell. 
Joshua Peckham and Deborah Greene. 
Edward Walking and Mary Parliament. 
Daniel Wilcox and Rebeckah Tucker. 
Horatio Feke and Catharine Nichols. 
Paul Batty and Mary Hart. 

Joshua Barker, Middletown, and Hannah Shaw, 
Newport. 

Jeremiah Fones Greene and Elizabeth Moulton. 

Charles Kaighn and Abigail Turner. 

William Macklan and Elizabeth R^ed. 

Richard Reynold Barker and Abigail Rogers. 

Thomas Jackson and Abigail Leapkins. 
Nathan West and Sarah Benackland. 
Christopher Brown, North Kingstown, and Pen- 
lope Holley, Newport. 
David Braman and Elizabeth Murphy. 
William Creapon and Elizabeth Smith. 
William Clarke and Pheby Grinnall. 
James Vickery and Rachel Allison. 
John Zathbury and Hannah Shearman. 
Stephen Culver and Pheby Pike, Prudence, R. I. 
John Langley and Elizabeth Sinking. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Edward Hare and Sarah Milward. 
John Martm and Jane Brown. 

Norton Thurston and Ann Green. 

Thomas Howard and Abigail Lawton. 

Aaron Sheffield and Ruth Nichols. 

Jonah Wood and Lidia Irish. 

Samuel Bayley and Mary Rider. 

Benjamin James and Elizabeth Bonnis. 
John Topham and Ann Tew. 

Solomon Southwick and Ann Carpenter. 

Richard Mores and Hannah Clarke. 

Samuel Mores and Almey Sylvester. 

James Bell, Newport, and Phebe Barker, Middle- 
town. 

Nathan Bower and Sarah Hay ward. 

Edward Dickens and Rebeckah Rhodes. 

Thomas Murry and Jane Smith. 

John Spinney and Mary Philips. 

Joseph Rider and Barshebe Lewis, Middletown. 

Lemuel Tucker, Newport, and Sarah Lawton, 
Portsmouth. 

Benjamin Ingraham and Sarah Sheffield. 

Benjamin Green and Ruth Wilcox. 

Daniel Vaughn and Sarah Sabins. 

Edward Sparger and Katharine Belcher. 

Thomas Briggs and Eathel Lake. 
William Milward and Sarah Martin. 
William Earle and Rebeckah Burch. 
Joseph Allen and Martha Wright. 
James Cahoone and Mary Hudson. 
Edmond Pinneger and Martha King. 
Brenton Perkins and Mehitabel Carr. 
Ralph Vassells and Catharine Dodery. 
Godfrey Brown and Pheby Remington, Ports- 
mouth. 
May 27. Joseph Allen and Aliec Burnes. 



152 




April 


.14. 


May 


3. 


(( 


25. 


(( 


25. 


June 


4. 


(( 


4. 


(( 


7. 


a 


20. 


it, 


20. 


a 


20. 


July 


16. 


(( 


24. 


Oct. 


5. 


(( 


5. 


(.(, 


24. 


4( 


25. 


Nov. 


8. 


a 


16. 


a 


23. 


Dec. 


10. 


(; 


13. 


(( 


24. 


(( 


26. 


1770. 




Jan. 


6. 


li 


10. 


Feb. 


15. 


Mch. 


IL 


a 


18. 


a 


18. 


April 


3. 


a 


8. 


u 


12. 



June 


7. 


u 


10. 


a 


30. 


July 


10. 


(4 


10. 


Aug. 


22. 


Sept. 


16. 


Oct. 


16. 


u 


21. 


Nov. 


11. 


'(. 


15. 


i,i 


15. 


ti 


15. 


li 


15. 


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2. 


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1771. 


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ii. 


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(I 


30. 


u 


31. 


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14. 


(C 


24. 


Mar. 


22. 

• 


(( 


26. 


April 


17. 


(( 


26. 


May 


13. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 153 

John Wanton of Newport and Content Easton of 

Middletown. 
Adam Furginson and Mercy Hix. 
Peter Smith and Abigail Carter. 
Hubbard Ryan and Ann Thurston. 
Cornelius Morgan and Pheby Proud. 
James Parsons and Sally Easton. 
Phillip Fell and Deborah Chadwick. 
John Campbell and Mary Rows. 
Peleg Rogers and Mary Sanford. 
Samuel Marshall and Merriam Nichols. 
Timotliy Bigley and Elizabeth Thompson. 
Joseph Clarke and Barberry Chambers. 
Jethro Townsend and Phillis Cozzens. 
Peleg Burroughs and Susanna Cliild. 
Henry Sole and Sarah Millett. 
Lawrence P. Down and Rebecca Clarke. 
Tliomas Sanford and Hannah Seagars. 
Steplien Hall and Sarah Worgans. 
Eleazer Read and Elizabeth Marshall. 

Benjamin C. Gi'ifton and Alice Seagars. 
Benjamin Shearman and Susannah Ba3dey. 
William Hutcherson and Abigail Sjdv eater. 
John Vinvrecum and Susannah Tripp. 
John Muni'o and Sarah Barney. 
James Cooper and P^reelove Jackson. 
Daniel Watts and Susannah Langworthy. 
Wing Spoon er and Frances Burrouglis. 
John Friend and Mary McNewmare. 
Tliomas Hopkins and Phcl)y Woodman of Mid- 
dletown. 
Quaco Johnson and Pinder Mumford. 
William Gunners and Mary Johnson. 
William Bruff and Mary Coggeshall. 

Thomas Burrell, Jr. and Phebe Taylor. 
(To be continued.) ^.zSS 



154 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND ITISTORY. 



Some Indian Names of Places on Long Island, 
N. Y., and their Correspondences 

IN VIRGINIA. 

AS MENTIONED BY CAPT. JOHN SMITH AND ASSOCIATES. 



CONTRIBUTED BY WILLIAM WALLACE TOOKER. 




,N the town of Islip, Long Island, with its source in the 
dismal tract of wild land, lying about one and a halJ 
miles south of the Long Island R. R., is a stream oi 
water known as the Orowoc Brook. Flowing south- 
ward for two miles and a half, through the entangled thicl^ets 
of swamp bushes, pepperidge trees and boggy marshes, that 
extend for twenty to thirty rods, on each side of the stream, 
it at last empties into the artificial pond — also called Orowoc 
— just below the Montauk diyision of the L. I., R. R. Below 
this point the stream has succumbed to the march of improye- 
ments, in the shape of dredging, damming and filling, and 
now many fine residences line its banks. It is first found on 
record March 26tli, 1692, when Governor Ingoldsby granted 
a patent to Andrew Gibb, a prominent lawyer and land 
owner in the neighboring town of Brookhaven: — "For a 
certain tract of yacant land upon Long Island commonly 
called and known by the name of Winganhappagne neck, 
being bounded on the east by Winganhappagne Riyer, south 
by the bay, west by Oretvahe River, and north by a right line 
from the head of Winganhappagne River to the head of the 
said OrewaJce River." This part of the town of Islip was 
about the last settled on Long Island. The land being 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 155 

covered by scraggy timber, intersected and dotted by numer- 
ous streams and swamps, it naturally remained unoccupied 
for a long period after the settlement of other towns on the 
Island. From the great scarcity of aboriginal relics and 
evidences of village sites, it must have been destitute of 
Indian habitations. History, proren by the early deeds and 
records, informs us that the two principal villages of the 
Indians were located at Secatayue Neck on the west, and at 
Unkecliaug in Brookhaven on the east, thus leaving the 
greater part of tlie present town of Islip a wilderness; so it 
remains today in its northern and central portions. The 
brook takes its name from the land through which it passes, 
being as stated in Gibb's patent, "vacant land." Orewake^ 
Orawake^ Orawoc^ Orowoc^ or Orlwlc-^ as it is variously given 
in the early records, is the equivalent of the Massachusetts 
(Eliot) touoli or {touwa)-auke^ "old vacant abandoned land," 
Delawarcs tauwata'wlk,''^iin uninhabited tract," tauwatawique, 
"in the wilderness." Eliot uses touoh or (toitwa) -komuk for 
"a wild place," — a wilderness, — a desert,— a solitary place,-a 
forsaken place, — a wood country, — a forest, etc., etc. Komuk^ 
a place, denoting sometimes a house, — a place limited in 

extent, — in contradistinction to auke^ — land or place, extend- 
ed, not limited. 

A parallel of this place name is found in Virginia and 
corroborative evidence as to its meaning is found in connec- 
tion with it, Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull has shown that 
the language of the Powhatan or Virginia Indians did not 
differ from that of the tribes of Southern New England, 
which includes Long Island, than each others dialect differed 
from that of the Delaware or Lenape. The Virginia equiva 
lent is frequently mentioned by Capt. John Smith, and it is 
variously given by him and his associates as Orapaeks^ Ora- 
pakes, Orapaks and Orohpikes. Eliot would have written it, 
perhaps, Touohpeauke^ "the wild or solitary water place," 
pe-auke^'-''^ Avater place." Long Island, — peage, as in Massa- 
peag^ Napeage^ etc. Sometimes, as in pang denotes a pond. 
Orapakes probably referred to the housevS of the chief 



156 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

Powliataii located at, or in a swamp, for Indian place name 
are almost invariably descriptive of the locality to whicl 
they were originally applied. Capt. John Smith writes:— 
"About twenty-five miles lower on the north side of thii 
river (Damaunkee) is Werawocomoco (the chieftain' 
house), where their great king (Powhatan) inhabited whei 
Captain Smith was delivered his prisoner;! yet tli^re are no 
past forty able men. But now he hath abandoned that am 
liveth at Orapakes by Toughtanund in the wilderness. 
Again; — "But he took so little pleasure in our near neigt 
borhood that were able to visit him against his will in six o 
seven hours that he retired himself to a place in the desert 
at the top of the river Chickahamania between Toughtanuni 
and Powhatan," (the falls above Richmond.) And again:- 
"He retired himselfe to Orapakes in the desert betwix 
Chickahamania and Toughtanund." This is where Smit 
locates it on his map of Virginia. Toughtanund was th 
southern branch of the Pamaunkee (York River) . For h 
says: — "Pamaunkee divideth itself into two gallant branches 
the south branch is Toughtanund, the north branch Mattaps 
ment" (now called Mattaponey). (Smith's Works, Arber' 
Reprint pp. 51, 80, 347, 375.) This locality has additions 
interest from the fact that here were fought some of th 
most severe battles of the wilderness. Grant in his Memoir 
says: — "Most of the country is covered with a dense fores 
in places like the wilderness, and along the Chickahomon; 
almost impenetrable even for infantry except along th 
roads." (Vol. 2 p. 180). After crossing the Pamaunke 
(really the Toughtanund of Smith), he says: — "The countr 
we were now in was a difficult one to move troops over. Th 
streams were numerous, deep and sluggish, sometime 
spreading out into swamps, grown up with impenetrabl 
growths of trees and underbrush. The b^nks were generally 
low and marshy, making the streams difficult to approacl 
except there were roads and bridges." (Vol. 2 p. 258) 
Another description of this section is worth quoting, viz:— 
"To the physical geographer the Chickabomony is interest 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 157 

ing from the fact that it is the northermost locality that 
retains features, in the flora, which are common on the rivers 
further south, in company with the growth of the colder cli- 
mate. The cypress here protrudes its curious roots, and the 
funeral moss trails from the trees. The beech sends its 
horizontal branches over the darksome waters; the maple so 
brilliant in its autumn foliage, and the gum tree more gor- 
geous still at the same season here keep company with tlie 
southern interlo[)er. Vines encumber the trees and harass- 
ing bamboo tliickets bar the way on the higlier banks. The 
columnarr gum trees in most cases rise from an intertwining 
assembly of arched and knotted roots, especially where they 
are liable to be washed by the overflow of the streams. 
Immense masses of debris washed dowii by the freshets lodge 
against the standing timber and the stream is bridged in 
hundreds of places by the trees which have lost their equilib- 
rium from bein": undermined. The river contiijuous to 
Richmond is invariably spoken of as the Cliickahomony 
swamp ; and here in effect it is a swamp. The main stream, 
with its coffee-colored water, is well defined, but in manv 
places for a quarter of a mile on both tsides of it the ground 
is a slimy ooze, affording a very unstable footing. Where 
this ooze exists, it is covered with a dense growth of water 
plants, generally of the [)eculiar whitish green found in 

plants little ex[)Osed to the light of the sun." (Pict. America 
Vol. 1 p. 257.) 

Capt. Smith, in bis voyage of discovery up tlie Cliickahom- 
ony in the summer of 1608, mentions another place, at the 
marshes at the top of the river, twenty miles in the desert, a 
vast and wild wilderness, where the river still kept its depth 
'but was much cumbered by trees.' Having been suiprised 
by the Indians, and in endeavoring to escape he stepped into 
a quagmire, becoming disabled thereby. He was captured 
and carried to their village of thirty or forty hunting houses, 
built like arbors covered with mats, which they remove as 
they please, as we do our tents. Prof. Arber calls this -town 
also Orapaks (p. 39G), but Smith calls it Rassaweak or 



158 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Kasseiieac. It was no doubt near the place afterwards called 
Orapakes, which then had no existence as a village, for 
Powhatan did not move there until January, 1609. The 
next year, in a speech to the Pamaunkies, Smith said:^-"I 
am not now at Rassaweak, half drowned with myre, where 
you took me prisoner." (pp. 142, 549.) 

Rassaw-eak^ — or, — ac, 'miry land,' the equivalent of the 
Delaware assircu, 'mud,' assiskuwini, 'miry,' Massachusetts 
''pissaquanit ^ 'mire,' with the locative termination — ack — 
'land,' or 'place,' Narragansett hassucki 'a marsh,' from the 
same radicle. This latter form being dupUcated on Long 
Island in many cases as Hassock. (See Coast Survey 
Charts.) 

The initial letter R, as given to many Indian names of 
places b}^ the English was not sounded when spoken by the 
Indians, according to Eliot, Heckewelder and others, and 
does not appear in their works, consequently it is intrusive 
here. A name on Long Island that is a parallel of the 
Virginia Russaweak is found in Rassaplagne^ a peninsula 
containing several fine farms, on the northern part of Smith- 
town. It terminates on the east near the entrance to Stony 
Brook Harbor. It is mentioned almost at the beginning of 
the settlement when, on November 10th, 1658, the Indians 
convey land "lying between Setalk (Brookhaven) bounds 

and Nissequoque River and a swamp called Rassapeagne on 
the west side." No date, but probably January, 1687, as it 
is put on record among other entries of that year, the same 
Andrew Gibb, of Brookhaven, petitions the Governor "for 
two small Islands of creeke hatch meadow on Rassapegne 
Bay." As will be seen, the name belonged originally to the 
swamp Rassapeagne, 'a miry water place.' This gave the 
name to the Bay and afterwards to the whole neck of land. 
There are other names in Virginia and on Long Island that 
show correspondences, but we omit them for the reason that 
they are not so closely identified with the adventures of the 
heroic Capt. John Smith. To him we accord all honor, for 
without his noble work, as Prof. Arber writes: — "There 
would have been no Plymouth Colony and possibly no United 
States." 



MAGAZIKE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



159 



Notes. 



The Name Massachusetts. In the Magazine of New 
England History for January, 1891, p. 13, I find the state- 
ment that the best authorities on the subject, say tliat the 
name of "Massachusetts" means a hill in the form of an 
arrow's head." Do the best authorities say so? I think not. 
This question has been discussed at great length, and Dr. J. 
Hammond Trumbull — who, without a doubt is the best au- 
thority — gives it true etymology in the Proceedings of tlie 
American Antiquarian Society for October, 1867, pp 79-84. 
The opinion therein suggested, that tlic termination or suffix 
set, had tlie signification of "towards," "near to" or "in the 
vicinity of," he afterwards accepts fully in his "Indian Names 
in Conn." making the meaning "in the vicinity of tlie great 
hills," or "the great liill country." This sigiufication corre- 
sponds to the place to which it was originally applied, as 
given by an authority earler than Williams, Cotton or Ujile, 
and who was fully conversant with the locality — and prob- 
ably more so than Capt. John Smith who first notes tlie 
name. That one being William Wood of Sangns (Lynn), 
from 1629 to 1633, who says: — "Three miles to the North of 
this (Wessagustus) is Mount Walleston a very fertile soyle, 
and a place very convenient for Fjirmers houses, there being 
great store of plaine ground without trees. This place is 
called Massachusetts fields wliere the greatest Sagamore in 
the country lived before the plague, who caused it to be 
cleared for himself." (New England Prospect p. 40). 

Therefore, Maunt Wallaston was the original "Massachu — " 
the great hill," while sett, was the field that the Sagamore 



160 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

cleared "in tlie vicinity of the great liill," and as Dr. Trum- 
bull lias shown tlie final s does not belong to the original 
name, Imt was added to form an Anglicised plural. 

Tlie gi-eatest Sagamore was probably Massasoit, 'the great 
king,' from Massa 'great,' tassoot (Eliot) 'a king.' This is 
also confirmed by several authorities. Samoset and Squanto 
during their visit to tlie Pilgrims at Plymouth in 1621, says: 
"that their great Sagamore Massasoyt was hard by." E. 
Winslow wrote: "Their Sachems cannot be all called kings, 
but only some few of them, to whom the rest resort for pio- 
tection, and pay homage unto them****. Of this sort is Mas- 
sassowat, our friend, "the Good News from N. E. (in Younge 
Cron. of Plymouth p 360-61.) He having lived there before 
the ''Plague," which happened a few years previous to the 
landing of the Pilgrims in 1620, carries Woods record back 
to the visit of Capt. John Smith in 1616. This quotation 
fi'om Wood, a strong corroborative one to my mind, was 
evidently overlooked by Dr. Trumbull when he wrote his 
study of the name. 

Sag Ilarhor^ N. Y.- Wm. Wallace Tooker. 

Early Laws in Massachusetts, Relating to Fires. — 
The first devastating fire in America was probably the one 
occuring at Boston, March 20, 1760, when 400 dwellings and 
stores were burned, causing a loss of X100,000. In 'the 
colony of Massachusetts Bay, regulations in regard to con- 
struction of chimneys and thatched roofs were made as early 
as March 16, 1630, and various enactments were made at 
later dates. The ordinance of tlie town meeting at Boston, 
March 14, 1645, made provision that each householder should 
have ladders long enough to reach to the ridge of his house, 
and a pole "about 12 feet long, with a good large swob at 
the end of it; " and various graded penalties were provided 
for those not conforming to the law. Q. 

The New England Courant. — At the meeting of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society on Thursday, June 11, 
1891, after two papers of little general interest had been read. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 161 

Dr. Samuel A. Green called attention to the society's file of 
the New England Courant, which had recently been rebound. 
It extends from November, 1721, to June, 1726. In de- 
scribing the file he spoke in part as follows: 

This newspaper, from its connection with Benjamin Frank- 
lin, is one of the most interesting of early Boston publica- 
tions. It was started by his brother James, who afterward, 
on account of certain articles therein printed had trouble 
with the public authorities, and in consequence was thrown 
into prison, where he lay for a month. On his release he 
was forbidden by the Assembly to continue publishing the 
paper, unless the articles were first supervised by the secre- 
tary of the Province. For the purpose of evading this order, 
the publisher's name Avas changed from James Franklin to 
that of his youngest brother, Benjamin, who then was only 
seventeen years old, and at that time an apprentice in the 
printing office; and in this way tlie penalty of the law was 
escaped. 

The name of Benjamin, as tlie publisher, first appears on 
the number for Feb. 11, 1723, and continues till June 4, 
1726 — which is the end of the file — although he left home in 
October, 1723, and never again lived in Boston. His name 
remained on the newspaper probably as long as it was pub- 
lished, which was not more tlian six or eight months after 
this time. In the issue of tlie Courant for July 2, 1722, 
there is a bare allusion to "Shakespere's Avorks," which is 
probably tlie earliest instance in New England literature 
where the name of the great dramatist is mentioned. 

A Curious Legacy. — In ye olden time, tliere were many 
things performed, which in this age appear very singular, 
and probably a century hence our proceedings will appear 
quite as ridiculous to our survivors. Mr. William Cory, of 
Portsmouth, R. I., made his will on the fourth day of Janu- 
ary, 1681. He had a numerous family, consisting of five 
sons and five daughters. He divided his lands among the 
former and gave ten pounds to each of the latter, and be- 



162 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

queaths liis children to his wife in the following curious 
legacy: 

"And I do bequeath my children unto ray wife next under 
God, desiring that they may be tenderly brought up and 
educated till they come to the age of one and twenty years, 
the males, and the females at marriage estate, and then they 
are to provide for themselves as tlie Providence of God shall 
direct them." P. T. 

A Tablet Erected to the Memory of Rev. Dr. Mans- 
field, AT Derby, CoNN.-The one hundred and fiftieth anni- 
versary of the establishment of Episcopacy in the town of 
Derby, Conn., was celebrated, June 30, with ceremonies ap- 
propriate to such an occasion, when the memory of one of its 
most prominent men was fittingly perpetuated in a tablet of 
brass, set conspicuously upon the walls of St. James church. 

The tablet erected to his memory and unveiled at the cele- 
bration, is of polished brass, mounted on Champlain marble 
of beautiful design, and inscribed as follows: 

To the glory of God and in 

memory of 

Richard Mansfield, D. D., 

Born in New Haven, A. D. 1724; 

' Graduated at Yale College in 1741; 

Ordained Priest by the Archbishop of 

Canterbury, Aug. 7th, 1748. 

Placed in charge of this parish by the 

Society for the Propagation of the 

Gospel in foreign parts 

in 1748. 

Continued 

rector of the parish for 

72 years, and until his death, 

which occurred in Derby, Aug. 12. 1820. 

Age 96 years. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 163 



Queries. 



j4istorical. 

31. Pastors, Teachers and Elders of the N. E. 
Churches. — The early New England eliurches had Pastors, 
Teachers and Rulincr Elders. What was the distinction 
between Pastor and Teaclier? What were the duties of the 
''Ruling Elder?" 

San Francisco^ Cal. J. P. B. 

32. Fire Engines in Boston, 1740. — In May, 1740, 
many of the inliabitants of Boston signed a })etition for a fire 
engine "to be placed at the Westerly part of Boston." Was 
one purchased at tliat tune? When was the first fire engine 
introduced in New England? Wm. P. Pkatt* 

83. Prizes for Dkjging Graves. — On the records of 
Boston I find the following motion recorded: — "March 13, 
1781. On a motion of several sextons — Voted; That James 
Williams be directed to apply himself to the Selectmen, and 
they be desired to state tio him the p?Hzes for digging graves 
and opening tombs in the two south burying places." What 
was meant by the word prizes? Was the digging of graves 
regulated by law? Where can such a regulation, or law, be 
found? Wm. P. Pratt. 



Genealogical. 

34. Reynolds. — I would like information concerning 1st, 
Nathaniel, son of Peter and Mary (Giles) Reynolds, baptized 
in Bristol, R. L, October 27th, 1717. There was an intention 



164 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of iiiaiTiage between liim and Mary Little recorded in Bristol 
June 13tli, 1741. In the town records there is notice of the 
death of Nathaniel Reynolds at Jamaica, September, 1747. 
Is this the same, and did he die childless? 2d. Benjamin, 
son of Benjamin and Susannah {Rawson) Reynolds, born in 
Bristol November 15th, 1722. He went to Chiquesto, Nova 
Scotia, probably returning to the United States about the 
time of the Revolution. He left children. 3d. Peter, son 
of Rev. Peter Reynolds of Enfield, Ct., born May 17th, 1730. 
He had two sons, Peter and Samuel. Samuel, I think, had 
three sons, Manassah, Peter, Moriah. 4th. John, son of 
John and Mary (Lickwood) Reynolds, and grandson of Rev. 
Peter Reynolds, born December 23, 1769, died in New York 
April 11, 1803. Did he leave children? 5th. Charles, son 

of Thomas Reynolds of Wrentham, Mass, born , 

1760. 5th. Eleazer, son of Thomas Reynolds of Wrentham, 

Mass., born , 1762. I would like to correspond 

with descendants of any of the above. 

Bristol, R. I. J. P. Reynolds. 

85. Salisbury. — ( ) William Salisbury, (b. in Swan- 
sea, Mass., October 9, 1685), married Bethiah . When 

and where did this marriage take place? What was her 
maiden name, date and place of birth, date and place of 
death, and what is her ancestry? When and where did said 
William Salisbury die? 

The said William and Bethiah Salisbury had, among 
others, a son Oliver (b. in Swansea February 5, 1711-12), 
who m. January 9. 1734-5, in Swansea, Elizabeth Haill (d. of 
Barnard). Oliver and Elizabeth are thought to have had 
about six children, the births of two of which are recorded in 
Swansea as follows:— Oliver, b. Sept. 12, 1740; Phebe, b. 
Fe^b. 28, 1743-4. What were the names of the other children 
of said Oliver and Elizabeth? When and where were they 
born? When, where and whom did they marry? When and 
where did they die? Bid the said Oliver and Elizabeth have 
a son Williamf When and where did the said Oliver 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 165 

die? (Note — Oliver, Sr., married 2d Lydia Bowen, of 
Warren, R. I.) 
Providence^ R. L Edson Salisbury Jones. 

36. McLaflin-Felloavs- Wells. — 1. John Rising, of 
Suffield, Conn., married there Sej3t. 22d, 1699, his second 
wife, Mary McLaflin. Who were her parents? 2. Ephraim 
Fellows, of Plainfield and Canaan, Conn., married at Plain- 
field Dec. 3d, 1711, Mary . Who were her parents? 3. 

Samuel Wells, of New Hartford, Conn., b. 1712, d. 1754, 
son of Samuel and Rachel (^Cadwell) Wells, of Farmino^ton, 
had wife Susanna. Who were her parents? Answers to 
any of these queries will be thankfully received. 

27 Went 26th street, New York, N. Y. L. E. Opdygke. 

37. Hopper. — I have been engaged for some time in 
tracing the genealogy of the Hopper family to which I belong. 
Three brotliers, John, Robert and Cliristopher Hopper, 
natives of County Durham, England, came to America, and 
one or two of them settled at Flushing, Long Island. My 
ancestor, John Hopper, appears to liave been a resident of 
Flushing as early as 1675. About the year 1700 he located 
in Woodbury, New Jersey, from •wliich })lace his descendants 
have scattered to various parts of the United States, many 
of them now being located in Phihidelphia and vicinity. It 
is said that Robert Hopper, brother of John, settled some- 
where in New Enghxnd. I desire information about any of 
the above named and tlieir English antecedents. In the lino 
of my maternal ancestry I am investigating the families of 
Coffee, Collins and Hudson, all of whom were residents of 
New Jersey. I am also investigating my wife's ancestry. 
Her paternal ancestry relates to the Fetter family which 
came from Germany and located in Pennsylvania, Her ma- 
ternal ancestry has been traced to Tillinghast Collijis, who 
was a mariner and a native of Cranston, Rhode Island. His 
grandfather was an Irishman who emigrated to America in 
Colonial times. Tillinghast Collins appears to have removed 
to Philadelphia, and on April 27, 1800, married Ann Gould, 



166 ' MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

whose family lived in the vicinity of Trenton, New Jersey 
and was of Welsh origin. Information is desired concerning 
any of the above families. 

Harry S. Hopper. 
dllf Walnut street^ Philadelphia^ Penn. 

38. Messer-Hutchins. — William Messer, a soldier in thf 
revolution, resided in Jones Co., North Carolina as late as 
1810. What were the names of his parents? When and where 
was he born? Date of his death and his age wanted. 

William Hutchins, born in Haverhill, Mass., married Abi 
gail Flood, March 27, 1760, moved to Wear, N. H., before 
1763, their children were James, Judith, Sarah, Joseph 
Abigail, Hannali, Ruth and William. He was at the surren 
der of Crown Point and Ticonderoga, was Lieut, in the Isl 
N. H. Regt. of the revolution, who were his parents? Whal 
was his age, date of his birth and death? 

Correspondence with those interested in Messer Genealogy 
desired. 

Box 155^ Onarga^ III. Moses H. Messer. 

39. Snow.-I would appreciate any information as to birtl 
place, anel date of birth and death of Daniel Snow, who lived 
at Rutlanci, Mass., until about 1790. He died in Marlboro, 
Vt., about 1812. 

Spencer^ Iowa. S. S. Snow. 

40. Lamb. — Steven Scott and Sarah Lamb, were married 
5th mo., 27, 1664, by Mr. Bellingham. — Braintree Mass., rec- 
ords. Who were the parents of this Sarah? Thomas Lamb, bj 
wife Hannah, had several children recorded at Glastonbury, 
Conn., 1765-1774. Who were the parents of Thomas? A 
Joseph Lamb, of Glastonbury, Conn., married Oct. 25, 1764, 
Rhoda Tryon, and had several children, was he a brother oJ 
Thomas above mentioneel? Jehial Lamb, from Sharon, 
Conn., settled at Westerly. N. Y., about 1793. He was born 
Feb. 8, 1756, married Huldah Fairchild, of Danbury, Conn 
Had brothers Alexander, John, David and Sylvenus, and 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



167 



dsters Elizabeth and Hannah. What was the parents names? 
Westfield, K Y. Frank B. Lamb. 

41. Waite. — -I would like to obtain some information in 
■egard to Thomas Waite, who, tradition says, landed in 
Massachusetts in 1634. I find but little relating to him 
mtil July 1, 1639, when he was in Portsmouth, R. I. Who 
;an give me an account of him previous to 1689? 

iSpringtvater, N. Y. D. Byron Waite. 

42. Ellery-Keith. — On the records of Hartford,Conn., I 
ind the following marriage: "1760, November 26, William 
i^llery and Susannah Keith." Who were the parents of 
hisannah Keith? Did they leave issue, and if so where can 
heir direct descendants be found? 

Marichester, N. H. J. F. H. 

43. Malbone. — What is known of Godfrej^ Malbone's 
amily? Considering his prominence there seems to be little 
Lpon the Newport, R. I., town records about liis descendants. 
Vho were they? Wliere did he originate? Inquirer. 



{REPLIES. 

2. Chester. — Leonard Chester, accordingto an old Clies- 
er chart, married ''Mrs. Mary Ward, daughter of Nich. 
Iharp, Esq., first came from England with family ob. at 86." 

E. H. W. Jr. 

11. The Oldest Baptist Church In R. I. — This 
exed (j^uestion is one tliat has been a source of much trouble 
mong the Baptists of Rliode Island for many years. We 
xpeoted to give our readers an abstract from the Recoids 
f the First Baptist (vhurch of Newport, relating to this 
latter, but we are unable to do so at tliis time. There is, 
owever, positively nothing on record in Newport to show 
hat a Baptist Church existed on the Island of Rhode Island 
lefore 1640. Mr. Sidney Rider, of Providence, publisher of 
lie Book Notes^ in a review of our magazine for April, takes 



168 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 

up tins question, and makes the following comments, which 

we fully endorse. The question is still open and we hope 

to hear from others who have made the history of this church 

a study. [Ed. 

From Book Notes, June 6, 1891. 

"Among the queries in the current number of this maga- 
zine is one from Texas asking, "which is the oldest church, 
the one founded in Providence, R. I., by Roger Williams, or 
the one founded in Newport, R. L, by John Clark?" This 
has been a vexed question among the Baptists for half a 
century and is one that will never be definitely answered. It 
appears in the Minutes of the Warren Association for 1848. 
That body then voted, "That the date of 1688 inserted under 
the name of the First Baptist Church in Newport contained 
in the tabular estimate in the minutes of last year be stricken 
out and the date be inserted as in the Minutes of the years 
preceedirig." At the same time a committee was appointed 
to examine the evidence concerning the two dates. This 
committee consisted of Rev. T. C. Jameson, Rev. J. P. Tus- 
tin and Judge Levi Haile. The dates as before printed had 
been for Providence, 1639, for Newport, 1644. The purpose 
of the Newport party was to antedate Providence by one 
year making their date 1638. This committee reported the 
following year and their report is in the Warren Minutes, 
1849, p. 13. They gave the opinion "that the church at 
Newport was foi-med certainly before the first of May, 1639, 
and probably on the 7th of March, 1688; they also gave a 
synopsis of the evidence and the association voted, "that the 
date 1644, which has appeared in our statistical table as 
designating the true origin of the First Baptist Church in 
Newport, be erased and left blank." This action was for 

the purpose of giving the First Baptist Church in Providence 
an o[)portunity to put in an answer, which it did in a Review 
of the Report^ prepared by a committee of the church consist- 
ing of the pastor, James N. Granger, Alexis Caswell and 
William Gammell. Their report was printed in 1850. It is 
an exceedingl}^ acute piece of historical criticism; by far the 
best piece of historical work of the Rhode Island scholars of 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 169 

the time; one fine flower in a wilderness of weeds. In it the 
authors admit that Winthrop mentions the establishment of 
a church, or at least of a preacher in Newport in 1688, but 
thej adroitly raise the question whether that church was 
Baptist in its character, and the further question whether 
the First Baptist Church in Newport was the real successor 
of this church of which Winthrop speaks. Following this 
Review^ came in November 1850, the essay by the Rev. S. 
Adlam, pastor of the First Newport Church, entitled the 
First church in Providence^ not the oldest of the Baptists in 
America. Thus matters have remained without a definite 
result. But in its Minutes the Warren Association never 
thereafter affixed any date to the Newport Cliurch, while it 
affixed dates to every other Baptist church and left Provi- 
dence with the year 1639, as it had always stood. Let us ex- 
annne this question for a moment on a broader plane. It is 
to be assumed that by the word cliurch, a religious organiza- 
tion is intended. So far as these two organizations are con- 
cerned, neither liave Records wliich have any bearing upon 
the question. To either, reliance must be made upon pro- 
fane history. Hence for Newport we have to rely upon 
Wintlirop's New England, Callender's Century Discourse and 
the R. I. Colonial Records. It is a matter of authentic record 
that Providence was settled in 1636, that Portsmouth was 
settled in 1688, and that Newport was set off from Ports- 
mouth in 1639. Portsmoutli is on record with a cliurch in 
1638. Newport was not established until the next year and 
hence could liave had no churcli before that time. Provi- 
dence liad been settled three years before Newport had any 
existence. Roger Williams, who settled Providence, was a 
clergyman. Is it to be supposed that for three years after 
his settlement he and his fellow settlers had no church or 
religious organization? and had there been a Baptist clergy- 
man at Newport, why did Roger Williams resort to the Bap- 
tism of Holiman for a beginning? This is taking it for 
granted that Winthrop's story of this baptism of Holiman is 
true; and finally it cannot be argued that because Winthrop 



172 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 




Extracts from the Letter Book of Samuel Hub- 

bard- 

CONTRIBUTED BY RAY GREENE HULING, NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

AMUEL HUBBARD was one of the few Rhode Island 
pioneers, who kept a diary and letter book. The man- 
uscripts which he left covered, it is said, the period 
from 1541 to 1688, the last forty years of which 
period Mr. Hubbard resided at Newport. These papers were 
rich in interesting details of life in that community, especially 
T)f contemporary church life. They were seen by Rev. John 
Comer in 1726, and were faithfully used by Dr. Isaac Backus 
in 1777, when he prepared his history of the Baptists. They 
were extant in 1830, but as early as 1852 had been lost. 
The present writer has a copy of a note book into which Dr. 
Backus had transcribed much of the journal and a few of the 
several hundred letters which he saw in the original collec- 
tion. Dr. Backus had also written on the outside of this 
note book, "Many more of his letters are in another book. No. 
5 in quarto." It is to be hoped that whoever now possesses 
this other note book will speedily make public its contents. 

Samuel Hubbard was born in 1610 in the village of Men- 
delsham, a market town some eighty miles northwest of 
London, in the county of Suffolk. He was the youngest of 
ten children born to James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard. Of 
these ten, three came to New England. Samuel arrived at 
Salem in October, 1633, but the next year removed to 
Watertown. He joined the company that marched through 
the wilderness to the Connecticut River and founded the 
towns of Windsor and Wethersfield. At the former place 
Jan. 4, 1636-7, he married Tase Cooper, a young woman of 
some twenty-eight years, who had arrived at Dorchester in 



IVIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 173 

1634. The young couple fixed their home at Wethersfield. 
Soon they removed to Springfield, where Mr. Hubbard kept 
an inn. After eight years, May 10, 1647, they again trans- 
ferred their belongings to a new habitation, at Fairfield on 
Long Island Sound, then the outpost of the English Colonies 
on the side of the Dutch. Thence, also, he was compelled to 
remove for a reason which he himself shall relate: 

"God having enlightened both, but mostly my wife, into 
his holy ordinance of baptizing only of visible believers, and 
(she) being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at, and 
answered two times publickly; where I was also said to be as 
bad as she, and sore threatened witli imprisonment to Hart- 
ford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove; that scripture 
came into our minds, if they persecute you in one place flee 
to another. And so we did 2 day October, 1648. We went 
for Rhode Island and arrived there the 12 day. I and my 
wife upon our manifestation of our faith were baptized by 
brotlier John Clarke, 3 day of November, 1648." 

For upward of forty years he continued to live at Newport, 
at what he termed ''Mayford," proljably leading tlie life of a 
small farmer and practicing his tiade as a carpenter. He 
was intensely interested in the religious controversies of his 
day. For twenty-three years he was a member of the First 
Baptist Church at Newport. He was sent by the church 
Aug. 7, 1651 "to visit the bretherin who was imprisoned in 
Boston jayl for witnessing tlie truth of jjaptizing believers 
only, viz.. Brother John Clarke, Bro. Obadiah Holmes and 
Bro. John Crandidl." In 1657 he accompanied Mr. Holmes 
on a preaching tour to the Dutch on Long Island. In 1664 
he was chosen alternate General Solicitor of the Colony, but 
does not appear to liave assumed the duties of the office. 

In 1665 Tase Hubbard first, and a little later Samuel Hub- 
bard himself, became convinced of their obligation to observe 
the seventh day, instead of the first, as the weekly sabbath. 
They remained, however, for six years more in communion 
with the old First CJuirch. Mr. Hubbard was even sent in 
1668 with Mr. Torrey and Mr. Hiscox, to assist certain Bap- 



174 ' MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

tists in Boston who had been arrested for their religious 
views and had been granted a disputation. Dec. 23, 1671» 
Mr. Hubbard with his wife, one daughter, and four others 
withdrew from their former church relations and formed the 
first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America. In the con- 
troversies of this period Mr. Hubbard had his full share, as 
also in the subsequent extension of his peculiar beliefs in the 
new town of Westerly and at New London. 

His later days were clouded by the death of friends all about 
him, and especially of his only son in 1671. He found 
abundant consolation in religion, nevertheless, and in corre- 
spondence with the friends still remaining, among whom 
were numbered Roger Williams and John Thornton of 
Providence, and Governor Leete of Connecticut. The last 
letter from his pen mentioned by Dr. Backus bears date May 
7, 1688. He certainly was dead in 1692. His wife survived 
him and was present at a church meeting in 1697, after whicli 
no trace of her can be found. The exact dates of death and 
the ijlace of burial cannot be determined in the case of 
either. 

Samuel Hubbard was evidently a man of devout spirit, 
loyal to religious convictions, and kindly disposed to all 
mankind- To his forethought is undoubtedly due the preser- 
vation of much that otherwise would have been lost concern- 
ing the local history of his home. Dr. Backus has pro- 
nounced his manuscripts a "valuable collection" containing 
"a fund of intelligence." It is hoped that the following ex- 
cerpts will not be without interest to those who may read 
them. 

Note. Family Record of Samuel Hubbard. 

Samuel Hubbard, born 1610 at Mendelsham, Co , Suf- 
folk, England; came to Salem, Oct. 1683, Watertown, 1634, 
Windsor, 1635, Wethersfield, 1637, Springfield, May 10, 1639, 
Fairfield, May 10, 1647, Newport, Oct. 12, 1648, Freeman, 
1655, perhaps earlier; alternate General Solicitor of Rhode 
Island, 1664; died after 1688, probably at Newport or Wes- 
terly. He married at Windsor, Jan. 4, 1636-7, Mr. Ludlow 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 17^ 

officiating. 

Tase Cooper, born 1608 in England; came to Dorchester 
June 9, 1634 and to Windsor 1635; died after 1697, probably 
at Newport or Westerly. 
Children: 

I. Naomi, b. Nov. 18, 1637 at Wethersfield; d. Nov. 
28, 1637 at Wethersfield. 
11. Naomi, b. Oct. 19, 1638, at Wethersfield; d. May 5, 
1643 at Springfield. 

III. Ruth, b. Jan. 11, 1640 at Springfield; d. about 1691 

at Westerly; m. Nov. 2, 1655, Robert Burdick 
who d. 1692. Children: 1, Robert, 2, Son, 8, 
Hubbard, 4, Thomas, 5, Naomi, 6, Ruth, 7, Ben- 
jamin, 8, Samuel, 9, Tacy, 10, Deborah. 

IV. Rachel, b. March 10, 1642, at Springfield; m. Nov. 3, 

1658, Andrew Langwortliy. Cliildren: 1, Samuel, 
2, James. 
V. Samuel, b. March 25, 1644 at Springfield, d. soon. 
VI. Bethiah, b. Dec. 19, 1646 at Springfield; d. April 17, 
1707, at Westerly; m. Nov. 16, 1664, Joseph 
Clarke, Jr., b. April 2, 1643, d. Jan. 11, 1727. 
Cliildren: 1, Judith, 2, Joseph, 3, Samuel, 4, 
John, 5, Bethiah, 6, Mary, 7, Susannah, 8, 
Thouias, 9, William. 
VII. Samuel, 1). Nov. 30, 1649 at Newport, d. there Jau. 
20, 1670-1. 

lietters. 
I. 
From Thomas and Esther IIul)bard, dated at Soutliwark, 
near Londou, April 24, 1641. 

Note. Thomas was the oldest brother of Samuel, and his 
senior by six years. Esther was the wife of Tliomas. This 
letter has not been preserved. 

II. 
From Alice Hubbard. 
Dearlj^ beloved brother and sister. 

My love to you both remembered, hoping that 



176 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

y6u are well and yours, as I and mine are at this time, this is 
to satisfy you that ray husband is gone to England, he went 
from me the 22 day of Dec, 1644 and ye Lord was pleased 
to carry him safe thitlier, so that that day month yt they 
weighed anchor here they cast anchor at Deal in Kent in 
England, and there as soon as he came out of the boat he 
met my brother Thomas Hubbard, tho neither my husband 
had ever been there before nor my brother. At present the 
Lord hath cast my husband into Ipswich, at your cousin 
Joseph Hubbard's, and there is four of that stock that are 
very honest Christians. The Lord is pleased by his provi- 
dence to call me thither and my five children; I wod have 
been very glad to hear from you before I had gone, but now 
the time is so short I can't expect it: my husband also desires 
yt all his Christian friends might see wt God had done for 
his soul since he liath gone thither by blessing the changes 
he hath brought him under. Sister Sarah of Yarmouth is 
dead, her son Robert Jackson is well; my husband saw him, 
being returned from the war after 4 years service under Col. 
Cromwell' in all wch he hath not been maimed or wounded. 
When you send to us, send to my brother Thomas Hubbard's 
house in Freeman lane near Horsly down in Southwark, 

London. 

Your loving sister, 

Alice Hubbard. 

From Cliarlestown, this 24 of October, 1645. 

Note. The writer's husband was Benjamin Hubbard, 
brother of Samuel, and but two years older. Benjamin was 
at Chai4estown with his wife as early as 1638, and became a 
freeman Sept. 3, 1634. In 1636 he was one of only a dozen 
householders enjoying the prefix of respect (Mr.) He was a 
cautious friend of Wbeelright. He was made clerk of the 
writs Dec, 1641. lie seems to have acquired rights to land 
at Seekonk also. After his arrival in England he wrote to 
Governor Winthrop a letter from London (dated 1644, but 
written, evidently, after Jan. 22, 1644-5, as the above letter 
shows^ in which he speaks of his "invention concerning 



^1 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. ■ 177 

• 

longitude." In 1652 lie was a minister in Cobclock Co., 
Suffolk, and in 1654 he was living in Ardleigh; His death 
occurred in 1660. Savage gives his children as follows: 1, 
Benjamin, b. March 24, 1634; 2, Elizabeth, b. April 4, 1636; 
3, Thomas, b. May 31, 1639; 4, Hannah, b. Dec. 16, 1641; 
and 5, James, b. Sept. 9, 1644; all at Charlestown. Hannah 
m. Richard Brooks of Boston. 

The sister Sarah mentioned in the letter was Samuel Hub- 
bard's oldest sister, b. 1593, who had married Jolm Jackson. 

ni. 

From Robert Cooper. 

Loving and dear bro'r. and sister, Sam'l and Tase Hub- 
bard, my hearty love rememb'd unto yo. The occasion of 
this my writing unto yo is to certify yo yt I like N. E. very 
well. I wod not liave yo think yt I repent me of my coming 
to N. E. for it doth not, for I believe if I had staid there I 
sho'd never have l)een that wch now I see to my comfort and 
I hope it will be for my soul's good. I rest yr poor yet 
loving brother. 

Robert Cooper. 
From Yarmoutli, April 11, 1644. 

This Robert was a brother of Tase Hul)bard, the wife of 
Samuel. Another brother, John Cooper, was living in Lon- 
don as late as 1680. 

IV. 

From John Hazel. 
Loving and dear Christian consin and brother in Christ 
Jesus our Lord, I desire grace, mercy, and peace may be mul- 
tiplied upon yo and my sister yr wife with a sanctified use of 
yr present condition, knowing that all this worketh tog', for 
the best to those yt love God. Rom. 8. Not only losses and 
wants but persecutions and death itself for Ch'ts.^sake will 
be great advantage. Desir'g yt prayers for me unto the 
throne of grace, w'th my Christ'n remembrances and saluta- 
tion in the Lord unto all the brethren and sisters; and bro. 



178 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HlSTOllY. 

• 

Clarke and bro. Luker in particular, I rest your loving 

cousin in wt I am able. 

John Hazel. 
Relioboth, March 24, 1651. 

V. 

From John Hazel. 

Rehoboth, June 23, 1651. 

It is ordered by the colony of tlie court, that he whoso i 

absent from their meeting in public, or set up any othe 

meeting, shall pay 10s a person for every day. In this cans 

we know not one another's minds: to tarry I see no mai 

forward, and to go, no man as yet, for ought I hear or see 

can tell whether to go. I desire you to be private in what ii 

here written, only be instant with our God for us, yt th 

Lord wo'd guide our ways, I rest j^ours.in the Lord Jesus t( 

command in wt I am able. 

John Hazel. 

The enemies treason [threaten], as I hear since I con 

eluded my letter, yt because we were not at their meeting 

yesterday, yt our abstenance would prove costly. 

Note. The Plymouth Colony Records show that on Oct 
2, 1650 the Grand Inquest presented to the Court ''Johi 
Hazell, Mr. Edward Smith and his wife, Obadiah Holmes 
Joseph Tory (Torrey) and his wife, of the town of Rehoboth 
for the continuing of a meeting upon the Lord's day fron 
house to house, contrary to the order of this Court." Thes( 
persons had recently been baj)tized, it is believed, by Johi 
Clarke, and had joined the Baptist Church at Newport 
There is no record of sentence passed against them at Ply 
mouth. But on July 20, 1651, Holmes with (ylarke anc 
Crandall were arrested while holding a meeting at the hous( 
of a brother Baptist at Lynn, and were subsequently im 
prisoned at Boston. The two latter were released on pay 
ment of a fine, but Holmes in September following was 
whipped thirty stripes with a three-corded whip. As he waf 
led back to prison, John Hazel shook him by the hand, anc 
said "Blessed be the Lord." For this serious offence, Haze 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 179 

was sentenced to pay forty sliillings or to be whipped. He 
was resolved not to pay the fine, but after six or seven days 
imprisonment, on the day appointed for the whipping another 
paid it for him and lie was released. The next day he fell 
sick at a friend's house near Boston and within ten days died, 
being then nearly sixty years old. Just how he was a 
•'cousin" to Samuel Hubbard is not known. 

(To be continued.) 

Glass Making in Massachusetts. — The history of the 

beginning of the manufacture of glass in Massachusetts is 
involved in some doul)t. Bishop, in his History of Americmi 
Manufactures, states that the earliest works was built in a 
pait of what is now the town of Quincy, but in this he is 
probably mistaken, as the Salem works were undoubtedly the 
iirst. He assigns no date to this Quincy works, but Apple- 
ton's Cyclopcedla gives it as about 1750. This works was, 
iike most of tlie other early ones in this country, built by 
Crermans, and its site is known to this day as Germantown. 
Only black bottles were made, some s[)ecimens of which still 
3xist, which are of very poor metal and of rude make. The 
proprietors failed some years before the Revolution, and the 
lOuse having burnt down, it was never rebuilt. 

The first glass house in Massachusetts, and the lirst to 
rt'hich a date can be assigned, was erected in Salem about 
L6o9. In this year Ananias Concklin, Obadiah Holmes, and 
[^awrence Soutliwick received two acres of land each ''adjoin- 
iig to their houses," which was granted to them as "glass 
lien," for the puipose of promoting the manufacture of glass, 
riie next year John Concklin, another ''glass man," was 
dlotted five acres more bordering the previous grants. 

In December, 1641, the general court, for the encqurage 
iieiit of the enterprise, authorized the town of Salem to lend 
he proprietors £30, which was to be deducted from the next 
own rate, y,nd the glass men were to repay it "if the work 
lucceeded, when they^ were able." The works liaving been 
leglected for three years, the Concklins, in 1615, received 
)erniission from the court to form a new company to carry 
)n the business. Glass was for a considerable time after- 
vard manufactured at that place, which is mentianed in the 
Colonial Records^ in 1661, as the Glass House field. In this, 
md those which for many years succeeded, it is probable 
liat nothing more was attempted than the manufacture of 
lottles and otlier coarse descriptions of glass, 



\ 

180 MA(^JAZ1NE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Masonian Proprietors' Record. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



1i 




E find in the Concord Monitor an interesting refer- 
ence to a valuable donation to the archives of the 
State of New Hampshire. Secretary of State 
Ezra S. Stearns has just received from Robert 
Cutts Peirce, Esq., of Portsmouth, N. H., as a gift to the 
state, the Masonian Proprietors' records and papers, which 
have been in his possession since the death of his father. Col. 
Joshua Winslow Peirce, the last clerk of the organization, in 
1874. The value of these records and papers, in an histori- 
cal point of view, cannot be overestimated. The records, 
covering several volumes, are in an excellent state of preser- 
vation and tlie chirography is remarkably good. Much 
time will be required to examine and classify the large num- 
ber of papers, and to arrange the exceedingly valuable maps 
and plans of towns and land granted by that organization 
during the century and a third of its existence. A cursory 
examination of tlie records and accompanying papers shows 
the collection to be a most interesting and valuable one, and 
every person interested in the history of our state can but be 
grateful to Mr. Peirce for putting it into the custody of the 
state for preservation, and to make it accessible to historical 
workers. It has fallen into good hands, for Secretary 
Stearns has a love for historical documents and papers that 
amounts to a passion. The state is exceedingly fortunate to 
come into possession of these records and papers. 

The history of New Hampshire is not complete without an 
account of the Masonian Proprietors and of their active 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 181 

agency in the settlement of a large portion of the state. The 
story of the contest made by John Mason, renewed by his 
heirs, and the successful issue of the prosecution after more 
than two hundred years of earnest solicitation, forms an in- 
teresting chapter in the annals of the state. In practical 
results and as an active influence in the affairs of New 
Hampshire, the records begin with the purchase in 1746 of 
the patent by the Masonian Proprietors. In the original 
organization there were twelve proprietors and fifteen shares. 
Theodore Atkinson owned three shares, Mark Hunking 
Wentworth two shares, and the remaining ten shares were 
held by Richard Wibird, John Wentworth, John Moffat, 
Samuel Moore, Jotham Odiorne, George Jaffroy, Joshua 
Peirce, Natlianiel Meserve, Thomas Wallingford, and 
Thomas Packer. Within two years the number of shares 
was increased to eighteen and the following became members 
of the compan}^: — John Rindge, Joseph Blanchard, Matthew 
Livermore, William Parker, Daniel Peirce, John Tufton 
Mason, Jolni Tomlinson, Samuel Solley and Clement March. 
At this time the three last named and Samuel Moore owned 
half riglits. 

Grants of land were made as long as any land remained in 
possession of the Masonian Proprietors, and every town and 
tract was carefully mapped. In fact, some of the ma[)s are 
artistically executed, and would do credit to some of the best 
map drawers of the present day. There nuist be a hundred 
or more of the maps and plans, and they will settle many a 
mythical historical question concerning the location of 
early settlers in towns, wliich has been raised by tradition- 
ary reports. 

Joshua Peirce, a grandson of -Daniel Peirce, the emigi-ant 
ancestor, settled in Portsmouth, where he died in 1743. He 
was recorder of deeds and prominent in colonial affairs. His 
son, Daniel Peirce, was also recorder of deeds, and one of 
the Masonian Proprietors. He was also a member of the 
King's Council. He died in 1773. His wife was Ann, a 
daughter of John Rindge. John Peirce, son of Hon. Daniel 



180 



\ 



ma(;azine (jf new England history. 



Masonian Proprietors' Record. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 




+ + E (iiid in the Concord Monitor an interesting refer- 
ence to a valuable donation to the archives of the 
State of New Hampshire. Secretary of State 
Ezra S. Stearns has just received from Robert 
Cutts Peirce, Esq., of Portsmouth, N. H., as a gift to the 
state, the Masonian Proprietors' records and papers, which 
have been in his possession since the death of his father. Col. 
Joshua Winslow Peirce, the last clerk of the organization, in 
1874. The value of these records and papers, in an histori- 
cal point of view, cannot be overestimated. The records, 
covering several volumes, are in an excellent state of preser- 
vation and tlie chirography is remarkably good. Much 
time will be required to examine and classify the large num- 
ber of papers, and to arrange the exceedingly valuable maps 
and plans of towns and land granted by that organization 
during the century and a third of its existence. A cursory 
examination of tlie records and accompanying papers shows 
the collection to be a most interesting and valuable one, and 
every person interested in the history of our state can but be 
grateful to Mr. Peirce for putting it into the custody of the 
state for preservation, and to make it accessible to historical 
workers. It has fallen into good hands, for Secretary 
Stearns has a love for historical documents and papers that 
amounts to a passion. The state is exceedingly fortunate to 
come into possession of these records and papers. 

The history of New Hampshire is not complete without an 
account of the Masonian Proprietors and of their active 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 181 

agency in the settlement of a large portion of the state. The 
story of the contest made by John Mason, renewed by his 
heirs, and the successful issue of the prosecution after more 
than two hundred years of earnest solicitation, forms an in- 
teresting chapter in the annals of the state. In practical 
results and as an active influence in the affairs of New 
Hampshire, the records begin Avith the purchase in 1746 of 
the patent by the Masonian Proprietors. In the original 
organization there were twelve proprietors and fifteen shares. 
Theodore Atkinson owned three shares, Mark Hunking 
Wentworth two shares, and the remaining ten shares were 
held by Richard Wibird, John Wentworth, John Moffat, 
Samuel Moore, Jotham Odiorne, George Jaffrey, Joshua 
Peirce, Natlianiel Meserve, Thomas Wallingford, and 
Thomas Packer. Within two years the number of shares 
was increased to eighteen and the following became members 
of the compan}'': — John Rindge, Joseph Blanchard, Matthew 
Livermore, William Parker, Daniel Peirce, John Tufton 
Mason, Jolni Tomlinson, Sanuiel Solley and Clement March. 
\t this time the three last named and Samuel Moore owned 
half riglits. 

Grants of land were made as long as any land remained in 
possession of the Masonian Pr()[)riet()rs, and every town and 
tract was carefully mapped. Jn fact, some of the maps are 
artistically executed, and would do credit to some of the best 
map drawers of the [>resent day. There nuist be a hundred 
or more of the maps and plans, and they will settle many a 
mythical historical question concerning the location of 
early settlers in towns, wliich has been raised by tradition- 
ary reports. 

Joshua Peirce, a grandson of -Daniel Peiice, the emigiunt 
ancestor, settled in Portsmouth, where he died in 1743. He 
was recorder of deeds and prominent in colonial affairs. His 
son, Daniel Peirce, was also recorder of deeds, and one of 
the Masonian Proprietors. He was also a member of the 
King's Council. He died in 1773. His wife was Ann, a 
daughter of John Rindge. John Peirce, son of Hon. Daniel 



1S2 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Poircc, Tor many years was connected with the Masonian 
Pioprietois, as was his son, Col. Joshua Winslow Peirce 
(horn 1791— died 1874) who was the last clerk of the organ- 
ization. Tliis Col. Josliiia Winslow Peirce was a cultured 
man, a gentleman to the manner born, and is well remem- 
bered by many now living. Robert Cutts Peirce, who 
counts many distinguished ancestors in direct and lateral 
brandies, is a son of the late Col. Joshua Winslow Peirce, 
and the donor of the records. Joshua Peirce, another of the 
oiiginal Masonian Proprietors, was probably a brother of 
Daniel. — [^Fortsmoutli Journal. 

Mount Desert Island, Maine. — The first permanent 
settlement made upon Mount Desert Island was by Abraham 
Somes, of Gloucester, Mass., in 1762. He gave his name to 
the Sound, and also to the village of Somesville which sprang 
up at its head, near where he settled. He had been in the 
haljit of visiting this region, prior to his removal here, in a 
Chebacco boat (so called from Chebacco, a town in Massa- 
chusetts, now called Essex, where such boats were built), for 
the purpose of rifting pine into staves, which he took back 
to Gloucester and manufactured into barrels, etc. In 1762 
he took his family along with him, and for the first winter 
they lived in the boat, near the head of the Sound. The next 
season he built a house on the shore and moved into it, being 
the first settler. His numerous progeny are among the most 
respectable people of the Island. 

James Richardson, from Gloucester was the second settler, 
and his son George was the first white child born upon the 
island. He was born August 16, 1763. James Richardson 
was the first planter, and also the first town clerk, and 
served in that capacity for many years. 

Abraham Somes lived to be over eighty. years of age and 
was buried at Somesville. His wife was Hannah, the daugh- 
ter of Samuel Herrick of Gloucester. John Somes, grand- 
son of the patriarch, died in Somesville in 1886, aged over 
ninety j^ears, born September 4th, 1794. He was the son of 
John and Judith (Richardson) Somes. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 188 



Early New England Patents. 



4- 




R. DANIEL SPILLANE contributes an article for 
the May number of the Manufacturer and 
Builder, on Early American Patents. The 
V-^ j%^ following abstracts, relating to New England, are 
interesting: 

The recent celebration held to commemorate the foundincr 
of the Federal Patent Office, has called forth man}^ retrospec- 
tive articles in the press dealing with tliat branch of the 
national government service, many of which are incomplete 
in particulars while in general interesting. Since the subject 
admits of fresli treatment, tlie symposium of facts given maj^ 
be found instructive and suggestive, because the advance- 
ment of the race and civilization is exemplified incidentally 
in the liistorj^ of inventions in America. 

It is generally admitted that the first American patent 
issued was that of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
Samuel Winslow, in 1641, for a method for manufacturing 
salt. The record reads, ex parte: "None are to make this 
article for ten 3^ear8 except in a manner different from his, 
provided he (Winslow) sets up his works witliin a year." 
In 1656, Governor Winthrop refused to re-issue Winslow's 
patent. He, however, made out a document which reads as 
follows: "John Winthrop, son of the Governor, granted the 
sole privilege of making salt for twenty years in Massac;! lu- 
setts." Governor Winthrop was clearly a modern type of 
political official. 

In 1642, John Clark, of Massachusetts, was granted a 
patent which compelled every familj^ using Claik's "method 



184 MAC.AZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of saviiKT wood aiul waniiiiiP^ houses at little cost," to pay 10 
sliilliiigs [)er annum. 

Jolin l*j-out, Ji'., Moses Mansfield, mariner, and Jeremiah 
Brasier, of Connecticut, were, in 1710, granted, by the State, 
tliesole right and privilege to make linseed oil ''within the 
colony" for tlie term of twenty years. 

Edward Himan, of Stratford, (^onn., applied to the State, 
in 1717, "praying liberty to make molasses of Indian corn 
stalks." The assembly in response, granted Himan a sole 
patent riglit to manufacture molasses for ten years, adding a 
qnalification which reads: "Provided the said Himan makes 
as good molasses, and makes it as cheap, as that which comes 
from tlie West Indies." 

Alexandei Phelps, Amasa Jones, and John Coleman, of 
Hartford, Conn., sent in a claim to the Government, that, 
had it been granted; might have changed the whole aspect of 
the Revolutionary war, and deprived the Bostonians of the 
privileges of throwing the king's tea into the bay, In this 
claim, presented in 1765, Messrs. Phelps and company pro- 
ceed to say that they had, "with great pains and expensive 
pursuits, made discovery of a plant in a distant part of this 
continent, bearing such resemblance and taste to the genuine 
foreiofn Bohea tea, that we are assured 'tis the same kind." 
After dilating upon the advantages likely to accrue to 
society from the discovery, they pathetically remark: "We 
pray your honors would grant us a patent for manufacturing, 
and also for vending said plant or tea within this colony, 
exclusive of all others for twenty years." "Their honors" 
rejected the application. 

Up to the adoption of the Constitution in 1789, patents 
continued to be issued in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and 
elsewhere. In 1784, Col. William Pitkin, of the revolution- 
ary army, was granted a patent for the State of Connecticut, 
entitling him to manufacture snuff, to the exclusion of all 
otliers for fourteen years. A man named Donovan and a 
resident of Norwich named Lathrop, wished to go into the 
business of manufacturing snuff in 1785; incidentally, Dono- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 185 

van wished to introduce blue dyeing and cloth manufactur- 
ing, in both of which he was skilled. They applied to the 
legislature for permission to pursue their business, which was 
rejected. Lathrop's counsel worked with Donovan, and a 
fresh memorial was sent in by these two, which had an un- 
doubted republican flavor. The paper says, after passing 
over preliminaries: "Now, your memorialists beg leave to 
suggest that the Hon. William Pitkin, not being the original 
inventor of the art of snuff-making, nor skilled in that busi- 
ness, had no claim to that grant to the exclusion of those who 
were, and who had a good right to exercise theirs skill in said 
art for the support of themselves and families by a lawful 
calling; nor was it known that any legislative body has a 
right to grant away the trade and professions of the subjects 
of the State to any individual for his private emolument," 
etc. The paper then proceeds to discuss the question in a 
manner that must have astonished "their honors," Subse- 
quently they sent in a memorial to the legislature, signed by 
243 prominent residents of Norwich, wJiicli says among 
other points, "snuff is an article, of trade, and should be 
free," but without any result. 



A Quaint Epitaph in Attleroro, Mass. — In the old- 
burying ground in the north pa.Tt of the town of Attleboi'o, 
— the first cemetery in the region — is a lieadstone marking 
the grave of a pious negro slave, on wliich is rudely cliiselled 
the following inscription: — 

Plere lies the best of slaves. 

Now turninof into dugt; 
Ctcsar, the Etliioj)ian, craves 

A place among the just. 

His faithful soul has fled 
To realms of heavenly light. 

And, by the blood of Jesus shed, 
Is changed from Black to White, 

January 15, he quitted the stage. 
In the 77th year of liis age. 
1780. 



180 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND IITSTOEY. 



Record of Baptisms and Marriages 

BY REV. ROZEL COOK, THIRD PASTOR OF THE SECOND 

CHURCH IN THE NORTH PARISH OF NEW LONDON, 

(NOW MONTVILLE), CONN., FROM 1784 TO 1798. 



CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY A. BAKER. 




k.t^ EV. ROZEL COOK was ordained pastor of the church 
June 29th, 1784. He came from Watertown, Conn. 
He died April 18th, 1798, in the fourteenth year of 
his ministry, and the forty-second year of his age. 
He was married to Sarah Blakely June 10th, 1784. At his 
death his wife had had seven children, all of whom liyed to 
be married, and all settled in the town of Montville and had 
families. 

BaptisnQs. 

1784. 

July 1. Joseph, son to Dea. Nathaniel Otis. 

" 8. Elizabeth, dau. " " " 

Aug. — Rozel, son to Andrew Chappell. 

" — Anna, dau. to Dea. Joseph Chester. 

1785. 

Mar. — Sarah, dau. to Dea. Joseph Chester. 

'' — Ebenezer, son to Rev. Rozel Cook. 
June 26. George, son to Dr. David H. Jewett. 
Aug. 7. Lewis, son to Nancy, a servant of Esq. Wm. Hill- 
house. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 187 

1785. 

Oct. 16. Mumford, son to Samuel Dolbeare. 

" Abigail, daii. " " 

" Samuel, son " " 

Oct. 23. Olive Whaley, adult, wife of Samuel. 

" Alexander, son to Samuel and Olive Whaley. 

" Jonathan, " " " ' " 

" Martha, dau. to " " " 

1786. 

Sep. 21. Amy, adult, wife of Dea. Nathaniel Otis. 

Nov. 5. Lemuel, son to Joseph Chester, Jr. 

1787. 

Apr.l5. Rosetta, dau. to Rev. Rozel Cook. • 

" 22. Joshua, son to Samuel Whalev- 

Aug.l2. Patience, dau. to Dr. David H. Jewett. 

" Anna, " " " " 

Aug.26. Martin, son to Lemuel Lee. 

Sept. 2. Thomas, son to Abraham Avery. 

Oct. 7. Oliver Hillhouse, son to William Prince. 

Dec. • 2. Betsey, dau. to Capt. John G. Hillhouse. 

1788. 

Mar. 9. Josepli, son to Jose[)h Chester, Jr. 

June L Joshua, son to Josiah Raymond. 

Aug.l7. Betsey, dau. to Jareel Comstock. 

'' Eleanor, '' " " 

" Rachel, "- " " 

'* Sarali, '' *• " 

Oct. 26. William, son to Jeremiah VoUet. 

" Mary, dau. to " 

1789. 

Apr. 12. Amy, dau. to Jareel Comstock. 

Junel4. Samuel Palmer, sou to Samuel VViialey. 

Sep. 25. Christopher, " " " 

1790. 

Jan. 31. Orhmdo, son to Josiah Raymond, 

Mar. 21. John, son to William Burke. 

'' William, "- *' '^ 



188 

1790. 

A|)ril 4. 

]\hiy 3. 
i( (( 

(( (i 

t( a 

Aug-. 1. 
Oct. 3. 

" 31. 

" 31. 
Nov. 1. 

u a 

u .4 






it, 



it 



a 
a 



u 



a 



" 22. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 

Eiiistus, son to Joseph Chester, Jr. 
Small, of Major John G. Hillhouse. 
Mary, " 
Tliomas 

Jason Allen, son to James Rogers. 
Lettise, adult, wife of *' " 

Samuel, son to Jareel Comstock. 
Rachel, daughter to Frederick Whipple. 
Abby, 

Joseph, of Joseph Bradford. 
Stephen, 
•William, 
Sherwood, „ 
Patience, " 
John, 
Eunice, 









u 



u 
u 



a 



1791. 
Mch. 13 

Apr. 24 
Nov. 13 
1792.. 
Mch. 11 
May 6 
June 2 
Aug. 19 






u 

1798. 
Mch. 
Oct. 13. 

1794. 

May 11. 



Harriet, daughter to Dr. David H. Jewett. 
Aurelia, daughter to Rev. Rozel Cook. 
James, son to James Rogers, 

— Josiah, son to Josiah Raymond. 

Mary Shaw, daughter to Frederick Whipple. 

Jareel, son to Jareel Comstock. 

Peggy, of Nathaniel Comstock* 

Charlotte, 

Anna, 

Sophia, 

Mary, 

Nathaniel, 



i( 



((' 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



(( 



a 



a 



Mary, daughter to Rev. Rozel Cook. 
Lydia, daughter to Samuel Palmer. 
Robert, son to " 



(( 



Joseph Chester, son to Jareel Comstock, 






MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 189 

1794. ' 

May 25. William, of Jonathan Hill, 

u u Peggy, " " 

" " George, " " 

'' " Charlotte, " 

" '' Mehitable, 

" " Charles, " " 

^' " Jonathan, « u 

1795. 

Feb. 1. Clarissa, daughter to Rev. Rozel Cook. 

Aug. 23 Seviah, daughter to Frederick Whipple. 
1796. 

July 3. Jewett, of Joshua Raymond, 

" " Mary, " " 

" " Elizabeth, " " 

'' " Joshua Lord, " 

'» " Martha, " " 

Sept. 25 Nancy, of Bliss Willoughby. 

^' '' David, '' 

^' *' Levi, " " 

Dec. 11 Lucretia, daughter to Joshua Raymond. 
1797. 

Feb. 26 Lydia, dau<^liter to Rev. Rozel Cook. 

Oct. 15 Samuel Whaly, son to Samuel Palmer. 

'' 18 Oris wold, son to James Rogers. 

Carriages. 

1784. 

Sept. 2. King Smith and Lucy Allen. 

Josiah Raymond and Elizabeth Baker. 

5. Gurdon Hamelton and Mary Hammond. 

Oct. 4. David Matthenson and Anna Manning. 

" 17. Jonathan Whaley and Mercy Chester. 

" 22. John Tracy and Patience Herrick. 

" " Jonathan Holt and Abiah Duncan. 

*' 28. Jonathan Noble and Lydia Bishop. 

(To be continued.) o.l.^^ 






190 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 



Book Notes. 



[Publishers and authors wishing a notice in this department should send 
copies of their publications to R. H. Tilley, Newport, R. I.] 



About AN OLD New England Chukch.— Rev. Gerald 
Stanley Lee has sent us a copy of his address on "The Good 
Old Days." It is published as a souvenir of the one hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of the Congregational Church at 
Sharon, Connecticut. It has more than a local interest, 
giving the reader an insight into the varied life of our fore- 
fathers, when church and state were one. The author is 
modest enough to say that "it is not a history," "not a ser- 
mon," but "a series of touches and sketches, glimpses and 
guesses," yet he has given many interesting facts, with an 
immensely entertaining account of by-gone customs and prac- 
tices of the old New England churches. Sharon, Conn., 
1891. 

The New England Directory for 1891 is this year en- 
larged, with many new features, containing over two 
thousand pages. The Gazetteer Department is a new 
feature, giving all the cities, towns, villages and postoffices, 
with population, etc. One might as well try to do without 
Webster's Dictionary as to neglect to purchase the New Eng- 
land Directory for 1891. 

Vital Record of Rhode Island. — Mr. James N. Arnold 
of Providence, R. I., has recently published the first volume 
of the Vital Record of Rhode Island, containing all the 
births, marriages and deaths recorded upon the records of the 






MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 191 

towns of Warwick, East Greenwich, West Greenwich and 
Coventry, comprising Kent County, Rhode Island. This 
volume is the first of a series which Mr. Arnold proposes to 
issue, it being his intention to reproduce the records (births, 
marriages and deaths) of every town and citizen in the state. 
Mr. Arnold has spent many years on this work, which 
deserves to have a large sale. Send orders to James N. 
Arnold, Providence, R. I. $5.00. 

Worcester, Mass., Town Records, 1801-1805. — The 
Worcester Society of Antiquity has issued No. 32 of its pub- 
lications. This contains the Worcester Town Records from 
1801 to 1805, compiled by Franklin P. Rice. The Worces- 
ter Light, one of the most brilliant and carefully edited 
papers in Massachusetts, thus speaks of it: — "This volume 
will bring the story down to and including 1815. Two more 
volumes will be necessary to carry the records to the taking 
of the City Charter. The careful and elegant way in w1)ich 
Mr. Rice is doing this work ought to be a source of pride to 
all Worcester dwellers. Our city was the tliird, in the Com- 
monwealth, to undertake tliis very commendable task, viz., 
the printing of the old Records. Only Boston and one other 
city were before us. To Mr. Rice we owe, not only the 
work done, but the inception of the idea of printing. One 
would hardly sit down to the reading of Town Records as he 
would to works of fancy ; but when a fact from the past is 
needed it is very desirable to have it attainable. Should any 
calamity befall the volumes of old manuscripts at tlie City 
Hall, this work of Mr. Rice renders the loss only tliat oi a 
curious collection, tlie subject matter is in hundreds of 
hands. Every old town in Massachusetts should do the 
same," 

Fugitive Facts is a book to be devoutly commended to 
that class of seekers after curious and useful knowledofe 
"that pester the weekly newspapers with all sorts of ques- 
tions." The author has brought his book down to date, 
covering a multitude of subjects from the time of Adam to 



102 MAOAZINIC OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

tlu^ oi)oiiiiig of tlio Kii'fel Tower. It contains nearly five 
liiiiidrcd \y.v^()ii iilled with queer facts wliicli are of real 
interest. 'IMie second edition, containing a complete Index, 
is handsomely hound in cloth. 



AppoupccnQCpts. 

[In Ihis department compilers of local or family history may insert 
notices of their intention to publish. If publishers and authors will send 
their circulars to the editor, a notice will be made up in the ofifice and 
pul)lished free of charge.] 



Snow Faisitly. — Mr. S. S. Snow, of Spencer, *Iowa, is 
compiling a history of the Snow family. 

History of Oxford, Mass. — The History of the Town 
of Oxford, hy Mrs. Mary de Witt Freeland, now in press by 
Joel Munsell's Sons, will be issued in September. 

^ History of the Burr Family. — Mr. Charles Burr Todd 
has decided to make his revised and enlarged edition of the 
"History of the Burr Family," an edition de luxe, thus add- 
ing greatly to its rarity and value, as none but subscribers 
will possess it. The important features of the new volume 
will be the Bui'r coat-of-arms, in colors, from the College-of- 
Arms, England, and a chapter on the family in England, by 
Dr. Chauncey Rea Burr, who has twice visited England and 
made a thorough search of wills. Parish Registers, County 
Histories, and other important works and records. The price 
of the work will be $5.00 in cloth or ^10.00 in morocco. 
Orders should be sent to Charles B. Todd, 1275 Dean street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ' . 

Matters and Men in Newport, R, I., 1858-1891. — Mr. 
B. W. Pearce, Newport, R. L, has in press a book which will 
be interesting to every Newporter. It is designed to be an 
e[)itome of history of matters and men in Newport, from 1858 
to 1891. This period is an interesting one in the history of 
the -'city by the sea." The work will be issued in four parts 
Qf fifty-two pages each at twenty-five cents a part. 



- 



]V[aGAZINE OfJ\{eW (^NGLANDjflSTORY 

Vol, 1. ■ October, 1891, No ,4. 

Extracts from Letter Book of Samuel Hubbard. 

CONTRIBUTED BY KAY GREENE HULING, NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



(^Continued from page 179.) 

lietters. 

VI. 

':^ ARY PURDY in a letter to her uncle, Samuel Hub- 
^ I bard, dated from Fairfield, March 12, 166-4:, says : 
brother John hath sold his land in Fairfiehl 



|m "My Ij 
i^ and is 



<fi^^ and is gone to Mr. Hutchinson's plantation that 
was. Some of our town and Stamford have bought it." 

Note. The writer was a married daugliter of Mr. Hub- 
bard's sister Racliel, who first married John Brandish of 
Ipswicli, England. Mar}^ was born tliere in 1628. Her pa- 
rents removed to Salem before 1633, where her brotlier Jolni 
was born in tliat year. Subsequently the family lived at 
Wethersfield, Ct., wliere lier sister Bethia was born in 1637, 
and a brother Posthu me in 1639. The mother, left a widow, 
married Anthou}' Wilson of Fairfield, and died there some- 
what later than 1683. 

vn. 

"Emanuel. 

Sanuiel Hubbard, a poor and the unworthiest of all saints, 
sendeth greeting unto the ch. of Jesus Christ upon 
Rhode Island ; grace, mercy, and peace be abundantl}^ multi- 
plied upon you all in our beloved Lord Jesus, who is our high 



1!)4 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

piiust ill 1(1 iitoiieniout wtli God the Father, by whose free 
gi'iice we aie saved by faith in his name. Dear and beloved, 
when I am in my thoughts of myself I am asham'd of my- 
self, and not without good cause to think of wt great cost, 
and pains, and wth wt large patience my loving father 
has waited upon me, and wth wt dressing and purging to 
have more fruit, and wt wild fruit appeareth, and what 
abundance of deadness, lukewarmness, etc. I see yt I may 
sensibly complain and say, oh ! wt a body of sin yet re- 
mains in me ! which makes me cry out : Lord purge me from 
my secret sins ; the consideration whereof work these 
thots in me : What, and I speak to others ? But when I 
consider God's works of wonder, which all set forth his 
glory, the firmament in his adornment, with both great and 
small stars, it speaks thus ; They are all in their sphears, and 
giving forth of their lights according to their appointment, 
and the earth her fruits. So ought it, I conceive, to be in 
the church, without reasoning or saying, Because I am not 
an eye, therefore not of the body, etc. The consideration of 
these and many other arguments pressing on me, as a sensa- 
ble heart when it wants help desires [itj of others, wod 
not such a soul be willing to put to his mite for others ? No 
doubt but he wod willingly. But perhaps his temptation 
is, he is a poor fallen one. The Lord of life said to Peter: 
When thou art converted; strengthen thy bretherin ; teach- 
ing thus much, that Peter's exercises were for other's infor- 
mation and strengthening, etc. Let me, dear breth'n, be 
bold to stir up your pui-e minds to be very careful yt yo 
be upon yr watch, for the day of our Lord draweth very 
near, for these are those latter days whereof we are fore- 
warned, for many deceivers are abroad in this evil world. 
Some that say all shall be saved, making our Lord's word of 
no account, wch saith his flock is a little flock, and ad- 
vising, or rather commanding, his to strive to enter in at the 
strait gate, saying : Narrow is the way yt leadeth to 
life, but wide is the way that leadeth to destruction, and 
many there be that go therein; and saith yt tho' his 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 195 

Israel be as the sand of the sea, yt but a small remnant 
shall be saved, etc. 

There is also a more mystical and higher deceit holding a 
show of something of a Christ, but in very deed deny him, 
that man Christ Jesus ; of whom beware ; and be you en- 
couraged in God's cause, for to me it appeareth matter of 
blessing of God, who hath kept his from that fiery destruc- 
tion and fearful blindness wch is so spreading abroad, 
making some to deny the faith they seemed to have. Yea, 
dear friends, how much more doth the subtil adversary work 
by casting in his deceitful baits to tempt God's own servants 
to slackness in doing of his will to halves, in detracting 
therefrom, or in adding thereto, of their own will? Know- 
ing right well that God requireth his worshippers to worship 
him in spirit and truth. That you and I and all his may do 
so, I beseach you, bretherin, that you will be striving very 
much wth the Lord in your approaches before that glorious 
and royal throne of grace ; be in season and out of season, 
public and private. The Lord in mercy help me with a more 
spiritual heart ; the Lord grant that this my short absence from 
you may so rouse me to be more prizing of your enjoyments, 
as also to sympathize with others in such lonesome conditions, 
altho' I praise our God, who hath enabled us to be spend- 
ing his days, as he hath enabled us. O pray for me, I be- 
seech you." 

From Musquamicot, May 26, 1664. 

VIIL 

JohnBrandisli (brother to Mary Purdy and Bethia Knapp, 
wife to Timothy Knapp) wrote to his uncle Hubbard, and 
said : 

"My brother, Timothy Knapp, is now living in Greenwich, 
near Stamford. I rest yours to command, 

John Brandish. 

Living in the New Netlierlands, within the borders of Flush- 
ing, upon Mr. Talman's Island, August 8, 1656." 



lyi; MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

IX. 

Mr. Boiiiainin Hubbard wrote to his brother Samuel, Mar. 
8, lGf)4, aud said lie lived in Ardleigh, betwixt Dedham and 
Cok'l tester, aud near them both. But his son, Thomas Hub- 
bard, wrote to his uncle Samuel from Boston, July 31, 1662, 
and said : 

"Your brotlier Benjamin, my father, departed this life Oct. 
28, 1660, leaving behind him then 5 children, who were 
born at New England — Benjamin, Elizabeth, Thomas, Han- 
nah, James ; and I being now come over about the land at 
Seekonk, liave been there to demand my right." 

He wrote again to his uncle from Boston, July 29, 1663, 
informing him tliat he had brouglit over his sisters and was 
going back to England again. 

X. 

''Plum Island, 
9, 8m. 1667. 

My very kind brother Hubbard, the spirit of power, 
love, and a sound mind, and standing fast to the end desired 
for you : It may probably be your expectation, j^t I improve 
the iirst opportunity that comes to hand by sending yo a few 
lines. I am yet in the capacity I was when you last heard, 
viz : counted worthy thro' grace of being a sufferer for my 
Lord Ch't and his truth's sake ; wherein the Lord hath been 
graciously indulging in very much tenderness, much sweet- 
ness, every bitter ingredient yt hath been in the composition 
of my tryal, whereof my being deprived of my true yoke 
fellow and refreshing helpmeet (tlie Lord gave me the mercy 
of enjoying 49 years) a few months after my first imprison- 
ment, was not the least ; but much mitigated in her high 
raised triumph to the astonishment of all beholders, especially 
at parting, whereof a particular account hath been transferred 
by my fellow-prisoner, a dear friend of hers. I remain yours 
in every entire affection as you stand fast in the Lord. 

Tho. Trenicke." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 197 

XI. 

''Boston, June 18, 1667. 

Dear and well beloved brother Hubbard — Metbinks it wo'd 
be matter of joy unto me if I co'd hear yt there were a com- 
fortable end of those troubles or differences that have been 
of so long continuance ; oh that if it were ye good will of 
God, he would be pleased to give wisdom and direction unto 
all of his servants how to act in time of difficulty ; and yt 
myself and every one would be endeavoring in the strength 
and fear of ye Lord to be very careful yt we do not give oc- 
casion to any to speak evil of the way of truth, and to 
have a special care to see yt nothing of self be set up under 
the denomination of exalting the name of God. The six 
days I am as comfortable as I think I could be elsewhere, 
but the seventli day I find the want of you ; yet thro' mercy 
I sometines meet with some inward sweet refreshing on that 
day. My friend yt I am with doth use all tenderness as 
possiljly may be witli respect to that day ; he will not bur- 
den me with anything. How long I may stay at Boston I 
know not. Let me hear from you as you have opportunity. 
Your unfeigned friend and brother in gospel relation. 

John Salmon. 

Note. The writer may liave been a resident of Newport 
at this time visiting in Boston. Certainly four years later 
he became a freemaji of Newport and was chosen upon the 
grand jury. In 1676 he had died, leaving a widow Kather- 
ine, who had the same year received by the will of Rev. John 
Clarke a legacy of an ewe land). 

XII. 

Thomas Trenicke wrote from Plymouth 13d, 5, '68, I sup- 
pose in England, wherein he says to Mr. Hubbard : 

''I lioped I should never liave seen the day in wch such 
fruit sho'd be found among yo, so full of gall and wormwood, 
as your letter seems in one [)art of it, to intimate in a differ- 
ence betwixt you and my dear brother Holmes, whose faith- 



rj8 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

fulness for CJirist and his truth hatli been s(i long approved 
among you many ways. The breath among yo I understand 
is between bro. Holmes and the congregation; but having 
received but from one hand, I durst not assume to give judg- 
ment in the matter absolutely." 

It appears b}^ his letter that he had been at Rhode, Island. 

XIII. 

Extract of a letter to Mr. Hubbard at Musquamicot : 

"Dear and much respected brother Hubbard, and 
brother Robert and sister Ruth — Tho' your condition be at 
present a lonesome condition with respect to that fellowship 
and communion that sometimes you have enjoyed, yet I hope 
yo are under such fruitful seasons with respect to the drops 
of heaven, that your actions that you are necessitated to be 
labouring about will put you in mind of that building that 
shall never decay. The objects your eyes behold are good ; 
it is the springtime ; the earth is putting forth its strength, 
the trees blossom and bud, and that wch hath long been kept 
down by the winter cold doth now receive life and vigour, — 
a new form from the shinings of the sun. I hope it is so 
with your hearts. I rest, and remain yours in any service of 
love in the best relation. 

Newport, May 26, 1664. Joseph Torry." 

Note. The persons named in the address were Ruth Bur- 
dick, daughter of Mr. Hubbard, and her husband Robert Bur- 
dick of Westerly. The town was then called by its Indian 
title, which is here spelled Musquamicot. Mr. Torry was 
one of the company at Rehoboth as early at 1644, but sharing 
the Baptist views of Obadiah Holmes, had some trouble 
with the authorities in the years from 1647 to 1650, and in 
1652 was at Newport. He became a freeman in 1653, was 
for many years a Commissioner and Deputy, and the. General 
Recorder of the Colony, and for two years Attorney General. 
He lilled other offices, both civil and military, and died in the 
year 1676. He had a married daughter residing in Westerly 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 199 

at the beginning of Philip's War, but the name of her hus- 
band is not known. 

XIV. 

Mr. Hubbard wrote a letter to Thomas Burge, I suppose 
of Sandwich, Jan, 24, 1674-5. Afterwards I find these 
words : — "A copy of my letter to my old friend Thomas 
Burg of Sandwich in Plymouth, 16d. 7m. Sep., 1677." It 
gave account of a distressing ill turn he had just before, and 
of relief both to soul and body. 

Note. The person addressed may have been Thomas Bur- 
gess of Sandwich, Mass., 1643 to 1661, and of New[)ort 
1661-1687. If so, this man must have been a resident of 
Sandwich at least temporarily after 1661. 

XV. 

Mr. Hubbard sent a letter to Mr. Edward Stennett, in Eng- 
land by Lieut. John Greene, Nov. 29, 1676, wlien it seems he 
went over as agent for Warwick. 

XVI. 

Mr. Hubb^Tj'd wrote to liis cousin, John Smith of London, 
from Boston, July 6, 1668, wherein he says : 

'^Cousin — I this spring having been at Boston upon ac- 
count of a dispute made shew of, the GoverJior and magis- 
trates with and agtiinst some of God's ways and of ours, who 
was brought forth to bear testimony for his truth. After 
several threatenings and imprisonment of some (and wliip- 
ping of Quakers) as I said, made shew of a dispute to con- 
vince tliem. I was at it, but not joining of them, only their 
wills was satisfied to proceed against them, that they might 
not meet public again ; if they did, any one magistrate 
might imprison them, and let 'em out 10 days before the 
middle of July, in wliich 10 days tliey are to be gone out of 
their colony. 3 of the chief of them are to be put in 3 sev- 
eral prisons. This was the main of my business, and also 
to see my kindred in the fiesii, where I was at my cousin 
Hannah Brooks's, for so is her name, where I saw a book of 



200 MAdAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

your making- I never lieard of before, which yo gave ray 
cousin Elizabetli Hubbard. I was much refreshed with it. 
I liint how it is with me and mine. Tlu'o' God's great mercy 
the Lord have given me in this wihlerness a good, dilligent, 
careful, painful and very loving wife. We thro' mercy live 
comfortably, praised be God, as co-heirs together, of one 
mind in the Lord, travelling thro' this wilderness to our heav- 
enly Sion, knowing we are pilgrims as our fathers were ; and 
good portion being content therewith. A good house, as 
with us judged, and 25 acres of ground fenced in, and four 
cows which give milk, one young heifer, and three calves, 
and a very good mare ; a trade, a carpenter, and healtli to 
follow it : and my wife very dilligent and painful, praised be 
God. This is my joy and crown, in humility I speak it, for 
God's glory. I trust all, both sons-in-law and daughters, are 
in visible order in general ; but in especial manner my son 
Clarke and my three daughters with my wife and about 14 
walk in the observation of God's holy, sanctified, 7 day 
Sabbath, with much comfort and liberty, for so we and all 
ever had and- yet have in this colony. The good Lord give 
me, poor one, and all, hearts to be faithful and dilligent in 
the improvement, for his glory, our soul's good and edifying, 
and building up one another in our most holy faith ; that 
while the earth is in flames, in tumults the potsherds break- 
ing together, we may be awake trimming our lamps, and not 
to have oil to buy, but be ready to enter with our Lord. I 
desire to hear how things [are] with you in your land. For 
this 30 years and more I have observed (as one said) as the 
weathercock turns with you, soon after with them in the 
Massachusetts Ba}^ I commit yo all to the God of wisdom 
to guide you, and to make you willing to do his will. Amen. 

Samuel Hubbard. 

There was one Mr. Nathaniel Johnson, a great merchant, 
and a familiar friend of mine, was much rejoiced in the sight 
of your letter, saying that he knew yo well." 

Note. The "dispute made shew of" was the famous pub- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 201 

lie discussion attempted in the meeting-house at Boston, 
April 14 and 15, 1668, between six representatives of the 
Orthodox clergy, supported by the Governor and magistrates, 
and certain members of the Baptist Church of Boston which 
was then about three years old. To aid the latter tlie New- 
port Baptist Church had sent William Hiscox, Joseph Tor- 
rey, and Samuel Hubbard. The question for discussion as 
stated was, "Whether it be justifiable by the word of God 
for these persons and their company to depart from the com- 
munion of these churches, and to set up an assembly here in 
the way of anabaptistery, and whether such practice is allow- 
able in the government of this jurisdiction." The second 
part of tlie question seemed scarcely debatable, inasmuch as 
several of the Baptist disputants had already been fined, im- 
prisoned and disfranchised for just this act. At the appointed 
time the discussion seems to liave been far from free. Cot- 
ton Mather states that while the erring brethren wei'e obsti- 
nate, "otliers were happily established in the right ways of 
the Lord." A document written by the wife of one of the 
Baptists present, says : "When tliey were met, there was a 
long speech by one of them, of what vile persons they were 
and how they acted against tlie churches and government 
here, and stood condemned by the court. The others desir- 
ing liberty to speak, they would not suffer them, but told 
them they stood there as delinquents, and ought not to have 
liberty to speak." In May following, two of these Baptists 
were banislied under pain of perpetual imprisonment. Re- 
maining nevertheless, they were arrested in July and de- 
tained in jail a year or more. One of these sufferers return- 
ing good for evil, raised a company composed chiefly of 
"Anabaptist" volunteers, and lost his Ufe at Deerfield Falls 
while defending the colony from the Indians. 

Hannah Brooks, whom Mr. Hubbard quaintly terms 
"cousin," was a daughter of his brother Benjamin, and the 
wife of Richard Brooks of Boston. "My cousin Elizabeth 
Hubbard" was a sister of Hannah Brooks. The "good house" 
was situated in a })art of Newport called by Mr. Hubbard, 
"Mayford," but by others "Maidford." It lies north of the 
])ond in what is now Middletown, and not far from Easton's 
Beach. Here Obadiah Holmes also had a tract of land. 

(to he continued). 



English Home of the Ancestors of the Seventh- 
Day Baptist Clarkes. 




^HESE members of our clmrches, a very large share of 
them, are descended from Joseph Clarke, who settled 
ill Newport, R. I., about 1637 or '38. He was accom- 
"T panied by liis brother Thomas, preceded by his brother 
Dr. John, and followed some years later by his brother Carew. 
Joseph is the only one who left any posterity. The family 
Bible, published in 1608, and now deposited in the library of 
Rochester University, contains the record of the births of 
these brotliers. made by their father, Thomas Clarke, who 
was born the son of John Clarke, All Saints Day, and bap- 
tized November 3, 1570. The record is as follows : 

''Carew, my son, was born the third of February, 1602, 
being Thursday, about fair daylight; baptized the 17th of 
February, Wallop's Thursday, third day of the new moon, 
sign in Pisces." 

''Thomas Clarke, son of T. Clarke, baptized the 31st of 
March, 1605." 

"John Clarke, born the 8th of October, 1609." 

"Joseph Clarke, baptized the 16tli of December, 1618, 
born the 9th." 

These births took place in the parish of Westhorpe, Suffolk 
county, Eng., eighty-eight miles north-east of London. The 
parish register contains a record, which, as far as it goes, 
agrees substantially with the foregoing. Witness the follow- 
ing item : "1605. Thomas, ye sonne of Thomas Clarke, 
baptized XXXI March." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 203 

Edwin P. Clarke, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who is collecting 
material for a genealogical history of the descendants of Jo- 
seph Clarke, of Newport, makes this description of the parish : 

"Westhorpe constituted a manor in the hundred (or town- 
ship) of Hartismere, in the noi'thern central part of the coun- 
ty of Suffolk. At the present time, the village is a small 
hamlet of farm laborers' cottages, situated one and 
and a half miles west of Finningham station on the great 
Eastern Railway line to Norwich, and about five miles due 
northwest of Mendelsham* and eight miles from Storo- 
market. The living (St. Margaret's), a discharged rectory 
of the Arch-deanery of Sudbury, and diocese of Norwich, is 
valued at £4, 18s, l^d. The parish contains 1,790 acres, 
33 horses, in 1844 the population of 264, and the assessed 
valuation of property to the amount of £1,706. 

"The Manor is of great antiquity. When Doomsday Sur- 
vey was made in 1081-7, it belonged to Gilbert de Blund. 
In the ninth year of King Edward I., 1281, it was known as 
the Lordship of Adam de Couiers. In 1371, Sir William do 
Ellingham, or EUenham, had the grant of a market and fair 
there. The Knight died in possession of the Manor in' 1403. 
The fee of the Hundred of Hartismere, in which Westhorpe 
was situated, was in Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, who 
having behaved himself with great value at the battle of 
Crecy, in France, received from King Edward III., a grant 
in special trial of his Hundred, in consideration of his ser- 
vices and merit. It was afterwards given to Michael de la 
Pole, Earl of Suffolk, the son of a London merchant. This 
Earl rose by his abilities to be Chancellor of England, but 
was subsequently impeached and removed from office. His 
gi-andson, William de la Pole, also Earl of Suffolk, possessed 
the Manor of Westhorpe. He had a stormy career during 
the troublous times of King Henry VI. He was general of 
the English forces in France against Joan of Arc, and was 

*This villai^e will be remembered as the birthplace of Samuel Hubbard, 
whose letters are being published in this magazine. 



204 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND PIISTORY. 

tiikuii prisoHor. Afterward he negotiated the marriage treaty 
hetweeii Henry VI. and Margaret, the daughter of the Duke 
of Anjou. He was created a Duke, and practically gov- 
erned England ; but he was finally impeached by the 
House of Commons, banished by the King, and murdered 
wlieii about to cross over to France This is the Earl and 
Duke of Suffolk wlio figures in Shakespeare's play of King 
Henr}' VI., and whose muider is depicted in Part II., Act. 
I v., and Scene I. 

"The Manor seems to have been an appurtenance of the 
Dukedom of Suffolk ; for we find that, after the extinction 
of the De la Pole family^ it was granted to Charles Brandon, 
a brother-in-law of King Henry VIIL, who had been created 
Duke of Suffolk, and who, with his royal consort, resided 
there at the noble mansion of Picardy. He was also a great 
friend of Craumer. Hume says of him : 'This nobleman is 
an instance, that Henry was not altogether incapable of a 
cordial and steady friendship ; and Suffolk seems to have 
been worthy of the favor which, from his earliest youth, he 
liad enjoyed with his master. The King was sitting in coun- 
cil when informed of Suffolk's death ; and he took tlie op- 
portunity both to express his own sorrow of the loss, and to 
celebrate the merits of the deceased. He declared that, 
during the whole course of their friendship, his brother-in- 
law had never made an attempt to injure an adversary, and 
had never whispered a word to the disadvantage of any per- 
son.' The Manor passed next to Henry Grey, Marquis of 
Dorset, who was created Duke of Suffolk, Oct. 11, 1551, he 
having married Frances, eldest daughter of Charles Bran- 
don. /These were the parents of the unfortunate Lady Jane 
Grey, who was induced by her father-in-law to set up a claim 
to the throne of England, on the death of King Edward VI., 
wlio, by letters-patent, had settled the crown on her. This 
claim was disallowed by the nation, and an attempt to en- 
force it involved all engaged in it in utter ruin ; the Duke- 
dom of Suffolk then became again extinct, and the Manor of 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 205 

Westhorpe again reverted to the crown for the third or 
fourth time. It was next granted to Thomas, Lord Howard 
of Effingham, Queen Elizabeth's doughty admiral against 
the Spanish Armada, who was created Earl of Suffolk about 
1597, and in whose family it remained many years. 

"The Manor House, the Westhorpe Hall, stood at the edge 
of the village. It was demolished some time about 1770, 
and nothing now remains but the foundation, a farmhouse of 
later date having taken its place. The cloister, the chapel 
with its painted windows, and the original furniture were 
kept up till about half a century ago, when it was entirely 
pulled down. During its demolition it was visited by the 
late Mr. Thomas Martin, a British antiquary, who, in a note 
left among his papers, says : 'I went to see the dismal ruins 
of Westhorpe Hall, formerly the seat of Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk. The workmen are now pulling it down as 
fast as may be, in a very careless and injudicious manner. 
The coping bricks, battlements, and many otlier ornamental 
pieces are made of earth, and burned hard, and are as fresh 
as when first built. They might, with care, have been taken 
down whole ; but all tlie tine cliimneys and ornaments were 
pulled down with ropes, and cruslied to pieces in a most 
shameful manner. There was a monstrous fioure of Hercules 
sitting cross-legged, with his club and a lion beside him, but 
all shattered to pieces ; and the painted glass is likely to 
share the same fate. The timber is fresh and sound, and the 
building which was very lofty, stood as erect as when first 
built. 

" 'The parish church is a very old one, its exact date being 
unknown. It is Norman Gothic, with a fine square tower; 
with buttresses at the corners. It is built of small surface 
stones, many mere pebbles, originally covered over Avith plas- 
ter. The body of the church has a nave with side aisles and 
cloistery, but no trancepts. It was originall}^ a very fine 
church, handsomely decorated, a few traces of the original 
decoration appearing ; but it is now in very bad repair. In 



206 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

one of tlie aisles is a chapel called the Mary Tudor chapel, 
and on the wall is a wooden tablet with this inscription : 

" 'Mary Tudor, third daughter of Henry VII., King of 
England, formerly lived in this Parish. She was queen of 
France. First married in 1514 to Louis XII., afterwards in 

to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. She died at 

the Manor House here in 1533, was interred in the Monas- 
tery of Bevey St. Edmunds, and removed into St. Mary's 
Church after the destruction of the Abbey.' 

''Such, briefly, is the place from which Joseph Clarke and 
his brothers emigrated, and in which they were born and 
brought up ; and such are its principal associations, with 
which they must have been very familiar. How long their 
ancestors lived here cannot now be determined, but it was 
undoubtedly for several generations. The parish register 
contains this item in reference to the grandmother of Joseph 
Clarke : '1540, Catherine, ye daughter of John Cooke, was 
baptized ye XII . day of February.' It gives also the follow- 
ing in reference to her sons : 

'1572. Carew Clarke, ye son of John Clarke, was bap- 
tized ye Xn. day of February. 

'1574. Christophei Clarke, ye son of John Clarke, was 
baptized ye VI. day of August. 

'1588. Thomas, ye son of John Clarke, buried ye X. of 

May.' 

"The (ylarke Bible, to which reference has already been 
made, has this record of her husband, the grandfather of 
Joseph Clarke of Newport, R. I. : 

'John Clarke, my father, [Joseph's father], was baptized 
4 February, 1541.' 'John Clarke, my father [Joseph's 
father], was buried the 7 April, 1598.' The grandmother of 
this Joseph Catherine Cooke, according to the Bible, Avas, 
'buried the 30th of March, 1598." His great grandfather, 
John Clarke, 'was buried 3 March, 1559.' 

"Although they may not have participated in any of the 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 207 

events mentioned above, they often saw the chief actors in 
them, and probably conversed around the fireside about the 
momentous questions which were engaging the attention 
of the masters of Westhorpe Hall. It is believed that there 
are now no representatives of the Clarke family residing in 
Westhorpe, which, together with the condition of its inhabi- 
tants, has materially deteriorated during the last two centu- 
ries. A correspondent well says : 'An American cannot 
come there now-a-days, and visit this district, and see the 
people living there and their condition, without being im- 
pressed with the sense of obligation he is under to the ances- 
tor who left civilization behind him, and crossing the ocean, 
laid in the wilderness of New England, amid the hardships 
and perils of a new colony, the' foundation of a new civiliza- 
tion, of which we are reaping the benefits.' " — William Clarke 
Whiff ord, in Sabbath Recorder. 



The Piscataqua River. — For more than a century and 
a half the name of the river which divides the extreme south- 
ern portion of Maine from New Hampshire has been written 
Piscataqua. The name is of Indian origin, and according to 
Capt. John Smith (Description of New England, 1616) was 
Passataquack. In the 17th century, and in the early part of 
the 18th, the name was variously spelled Pascataqiia, 
Pascataway, Pascataquack, Pischataquacks, Pischatawa}', 
Piscataway, Piscataqua, etc. The last form means nothing, 
while Pascataqua is sufficiently accurate to represent and 
preserve the meaning which the aborigines intended to con- 
vey by the word, namely: "A divided tidal-place." If it be 
borne in mind that both by the Aborigines and the early set- 
tlers the word was applied to the territory on both sides of 
the river itself, and that the latter near its mouth is split into 
two streams by the rocky island New Castle, the significance 
and appropriateness of the name will be apparent. It is de- 
sirable that the meaningless corruption Piscataqua be elimi- 
nated from our geographical nomenclature. — Note^ Historical 
Papers^ by C. W. Tuttle. 




The Orient and Occident ! or the Cartwright 

Family Genealogy. 

SOME INTERESTING GENEALOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS PROMISED 
IN THE WORK NOW BEING COMPILED FOR PUBLICATION. 

NLY those familiar with the work of examining pri- 
vate and public records, and in compiling such items 
into a perfectly woven family line, free from the rose 
tint of fiction, a close line authenticated by records, 
can appreciate the mental labor, patience and perseverance 
required in such a research, extending over six years— and, 
that well-kept family records are ever indicative of long and 
well defined family lines. 

Such has been the time and careful labor expended in the 
above named work, which, as usual, does not comprise only 
the genealogical line of this old family, not numerous, but 
strongly defined, dating back, not merely by family records, 
but also in parish and public records to 1400, but by monu- 
mental and historical records, back to the conquest of Eng- 
land, but also, comprises a condensed authentic record of 
other family lines, by intermarriages, extending their lines 
through old French and Netherland archives, and Hebrew 
records, into the arena of medieval history of Italy, Spain, 
Portugal, and the authenticated traditional past. 

vVt this time, it will not be proper to more than give a brief 
general outline, citing a few of the genealogical and histori- 
cal curiosities developed by this patient investigation above 
cited, as the work, though nearly advanced to publicity, is 
yet in the hands of the committee, and too much publicity is 
not desired. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 209 

GENEALOGICAL ANTIQUITY. 

It was not owing to any vague curiosity, nor idle specula- 
tion, as to the origin of family, that this work was commenced 
over six years ago — nor, to a desire to find fabulous for- 
tunes hid away in some self-conceived mystic vault in Euro- 
pean cities — but events of the past two decades, gave rise in 
the minds of persons in no manner connected by direct blood- 
ties, to place on record genealogical facts as collateral evi- 
dence of what, in a certain arena, was already a recognized 
and truthful entity in a collateral line. 

A copy of ^^ Coats of Arms,'' on parchment, had been 
held for over 250 years in America, by one branch of 
the family, while outlines of others, brought over in the 17th 
century, also existed. Of the first named, the records of the 
College of York Heraldry, of London, Eng., gives a place, 
even back prior to York Heraldry, when the French Lil}^ on 
its shield was its mark of Norman origin, and the " Ooof 
held by right only of family anti(iuity — for the family name 
was known on the Roll of the Battle Ahbey, in the persons of 
two brothers, as that of Auffroy & Maugier de Cartrait. 
But in addition to this it is shown that the family Avas known 
as an ancient one, and even thus carved in stone, as early as 
the 16th century, and liad become established as the old 
'•'-Norwell House"" of Normantou, Notts, Eng., with its Os- 
sington, Mailing Ahby. Sheppen-Hall, Aynlioo ^- Marnham, 
and other brandies, with intermarriages witli the Cramnor, 
Cobliam, Mollineux, Newton, Perrepont, Fairfax and other 
old families of Engiisli historic name. 

the AMERICAN FAMILY, 

That is, the branch that came to America over 250 years 
ago, and whicli constitutes tlie chief Trunk line, comes from 
the above family. 

Several other offslioots, of more later date, have found 
their way to America since the then existing colonies became 
the nation of tlie United States in 1776-1784. While the 
older branch kept family records, some of the branches 



210 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 

that cjinio to America .sul)sc(|iiently liave not been so cau- 
tions ; this, p(n"ha[)s, owing to coming from English branches 
(in Enghmd) wlio sprung- from the main stem 200 or more 
years after tlie first American Family, and for local or do- 
mestic causes, (so far as their immediate family line) become 
careless. 

This condition of family records and family tradition, all 
genealogical students well know, too often marks the de- 
scendants of old families, in respective periods, as earlier 
emigrants, by force of habit, and intuition handed down, 
preserved the family record costumes. 

This work only aims at the well defined, authentic lines, 
who prior to 1776, either by and through the Jamestown 
Plantations, or that of Massachusetts Bay — of the Colony of 
Virginia, which at that time extended from near North Car- 
olina, on the south, to near what is now known as Maine, on 
the north. 

Say nothing of over ten (10) Coats of Arms existing on 
the records of Ancient York Heraldry, many minor coats-of- 
arms have been elsewhere brought to light. Among the ttn 
above cited, is one dating back to the intermarriage of a sister 
of Cramner ( who was Arch-Bishop of Canterbury,' and chief 
adviser of Henry VIII.) with the Ossington House. The 
Bishop of Chester line (Thomas Cartwright) is claimed by 
the Ontario branch, represented in the person of Sir Richard 
Cartwright. 

In America, Jamestown, Va., and Nantucket, Mass., seems 
to have been two chief objective points from which the north- 
ern and southern branches spread. We find among them the 
names of Folgers, Coffins, Rains, Mitchels, and other fami- 
lies, both North and South. 

SEMITIC INTERMARRIAGES ! 

One of these we find in the case of the Mltchel Family, of 
which a branch, in 1731, intermarried with Hebrew blood, in 
the person of a daughter of a Jewish physician ; and by di- 
rect line of descent we find Miss Mariah Mitchel, (deceased, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 211 

28th June, 1889,) the great (lady) astronomer of America, 
of Vassar College, New York. 

Another of this Cartwright famil}^ (direct) line, united 
with a descendant of the ancient Semitic Hebrew line of the 
old Abrabauel-Thomaz family, of Netherlands, Spain, 
Portugal, Italy, and Syria. A scion of this family, become 
by intermarriage with the Du BOIS French family, ( Geoff roi 
1066) line, by authentic records, shown to be of that line by 
direct descent. Their offspring (by half blood) again well 
full Hebrew, — and again their (three-fourth) offspring be- 
came wed to the Oartwright line^ while their (three eighth) 
offspring re-wed back to full blood Semitic ! It is a strange 
blending, which a careful student of Johnson's Biographical 
Dictionary, or any other like authentic work, for a few hours, 
will show the genealogical student the remarkable features 
of this family Genealogical work. 

peculiarities and benefits of genealogy. 

It is an old saying, that black sheep exist in every famil3^ 
The wise man will so live, as to add a polished stone to his 
family line and Genealogical House. 

Whether one dates from Venice, and its moss-grown walls, 
Rome and its palaces, England and its cathedrals, or Pales- 
tine and its regal palaces, none of these things make men 
moral and upright. Far better to have a house with fairly 
white walls, crowned with battlements of stability, through 
a long colonade of centuries, than to claim the possession of 
one meteoric-like brilliant scion in a century, whose skirts are 
tainted with sensuality. 

As is truly stated in an article recently published in the 
Jetvish World of London, England, on the ^'-Ahrahauel Gene- 
alogy," when one has turned the time-stained leaves of family 
records and lines, "and carefully considered the wonders of 
geometric progression, — and, that the child of to-day possesses 
two (2) grandfathers, and two (2) grandmothers — and that 
ten (10) generations back, gives 2.048, and that twenty (20) 
generations shows the enormous sum of 2,097.152 grandp 



212 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

rents, witli all their moral and physical defects, as well as 
virtues, and for this reason alone, but little room is left for 
eo()tism." 

o 

Still, the trutli is gi-adually dawning upon the careful ob- 
server and student, tliat, as incentives and inclinations for 
crime may ])e inherited, so also may be those for virtue, and, 
without vain egotism, for the evenly balanced mind only pos- 
sesses sufficient to oil its mental pinions, one should 
exercise as right care of their human stock, at least, as the 
good stockman does for his horses, cattle, and other animals. 

In this connection it must not be forgotten that virtue, men- 
tal and moral wortli, are no more the exclusive property of 
families of those who, by the chances of fortune, may be 
wealthy to-day, than is crime and ignorance under the exclu- 
sive custodianship of the poor. In this short outline, we 
have only aimed at a brief glance of some curiosities in the 
genealogical blending of families and races, and which may 
tend to increase tire zeal of genealogical students, who may 
read the pages of the Magazine of New England His- 
tory, to complete any work they may have commenced, and 
add perfect and authentic blocks to the genealogical litera- 
ture of America. 

- "E." 



Window Weights Cast into Bullets.— The Massa- 
chusetts Assembly, on July 2, 1776, passed the following: 

Whereas it is of great importance for the defence of this 
Colony, in the present struggle with Great Britain^ that a 
suificient quantity of leaden balls be immediately procured : 
Therefore, 

Resolved, That it be recommended to the inhabitants of the 
several toAvns in the Colony, that they spare their leaden 
window weights for that purpose, and the Commissary-Gen- 
eral is directed to receive and pay for all such lead, and 
have it cast into balls. 



Record of Baptisms and Marriages 

BY REV. ROZEL COOK, THIRD PASTOR OF THE SECOND 

CHURCH IN THE NORTH PARISH OF NEW LONDON, 

(NOW MONTVILLE), CONN., FROM 1784 TO 1798. 



CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY A. BAKER. 



(Continued from pa^e 189.) 



1784. 




Nov. 


8. 


Ik 


11. 


u 


23. 


Dec. 


is. 


1785. 




Jan. 


14. 


c; 


20. 


Moll. 


17. 


ii> 


27. 


Apr. 


21. 


May 


19. 


(.(, 


24. 


June 


2. 


Sept. 


5. 


Nov. 


24. 


Dec. 


8. 


u 


25. 


1786. 




Jan. 


5 


1786. 




Jan. 


19. 


Jan. 


24. 



Thomas Rogers and Mary Baker. 
Peter Truman and Sarah Chapel. 
Timothy Gates and Rlioda Rawley. 
Natlianiel Raymond and Louisa Raymond. 

Walter Gates and Sarah Latimore. 
Peletiah Marsh and Elizabeth Witter. 

William Williams and Mary Jevvett. 
George Peaton and Haiuiali ITowel. 

Davis Newbury and Lydia Williams. 

Norman l^ester and Zi[)porah Tui-ner. 

Thomas Fitch and Mary Allen. 

Elisha Lee and Sarah Smith. 

Josliua Turner and Sarah Whipple. 

John Ames and Sarah Fargo. 

Loomis and Matilda Holmes. 

Seabury Brewster and Sarali Bradford. 

Azel Nobles and Hannah Nobles. 

♦ 

Josei)li Button and Elizabeth Maynard. 
Lemuel Raymond and Mary Raymond. 



/■■^ 



214 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Feb. 28. Pcicgi'cen Turner and Abigail Forsyth. 

May 18. Lebcjvis Houghton and Eunice Baker. 

June 8. Rozel Maynard and Almira Fargo. 

July 23. Peter Doyel and Phebe Diskel. 

Aug. 28. William Chappel and Anna Maples.. 

Q^.l^ 29. McNiel and Patience Maples. 

Nov. 80. William Tinker and Elizabeth Turner. 

1787. 

Jan. 11. Henry D. Bolles and Eunice Raymond. 

Jan. 11. Latham Forsyth and Eleanor Fox. • 

Jan. 14. Ebenezer Beebe and Sarah Whaley. 

April 12. Joseph Chapman and Sabra Baker. 

May 24. Billings and Anna Raymond. 

July 10. Joshua Monroe and Sarah Maples. 

" 12. Thomas Adgate and Elizabeth Fox. 

Nov. 1. Perez Comstock and Abby Raymond. 

Dec. 12. Joseph Church and Priscilla Monroe. 

" 20. Lebbeus Maynard and Betsy- Atwell. 

1788. 

Jan. 17. John Atwell and Martha Maynard. 

May 24. Thomas Shaw and Desire Williams. 

Oct. 22. Israel Richards and Margaret Morris. 

Nov. 4. John Brown and Charlotte Allen. 

'' 13. Andrew Rogers and Elizabeth Rogers. 

" 20. Joseph Cobb and Sarah Austin. 

Dec. 29. John Stanton and Betsy Maples. 

1789. 

Mch. 19. Joshua West and Elizabeth Raymond. 

April 19. Josiah Squires and Abigail Williams. 

Nov. 12. Samuel Latimer and Betsey Chapel. 

Dec. 16. James Fitch Mason and Anna Fitch. 

1790. 

Jan. 31. Nathaniel Bradford and Lucy Ra^'mond. 

" 31. Azel Rogers and Sarah Baker. 

1790. 

Feb. 23. James Smith and Deborah Williams. 

Mch. 21. John Manwaring and Eleanor Raymond. 

" 21. Nathan Tinker and Lucy Smith. 

April 11. Asahel Adgate and Sarah Avery. 
1791. 

Feb. 17. Daniel Apply and Sarah Atwell. 



MAGAZINE OF KEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



215 



Feb. 


17. 


Dec. 


25. 


u 


25. 


1792. 


■ 


Feb. 


12. 


a 


17. 


Mcb. 


17. 


April 
June 


22. 
2. 


1793. 




Dec. 


29. 


1794. 




Feb. 


20. 


Mcb. 


7. 


(( 


13. 


u 


27. 


April 

1.1. 


6. 

27. 


u 


27. 


Nov. 


1. 


1795. 




>Iay 
Oct. 


IP). 

7. 


Dec. 


8. 


1796. 




Jan. 


24. 


Oct. 


27. 


Nov. 


23. 


Dec. 


1. 


1797. 




Feb. 


16. 


Mch. 


2. 


May 
June 


14. 

27. 


July 

Nov. 


30. 
9. 


Dec. 


24. 


1798. 




Mcb. 


15. 


u 


29. 



Jobn DeSlion and Elizabeth Dalimer 

Stepben Holister and Cook. 

Edward White and Lois Baker. 



James Wright and Sarah Allen. 
Joshua Baker and Elizabeth Chapel. 
Asahel Otis and Mary Chester. 
Caleb Lyon and Louisa Thompson. 
Peter Fox and Jnda Gilbert. 



Asa Post and Parthenia Bill. 

• 
John Tennant and Hannah Atwell. 
John Avery and Lucy Woodworth. 

Hill and Ann Crocker. 

Bartholomew Coquegion and Martha Shantuck. 
Charles Maynard and Elizabeth Smitli. 
Henr}'' Mynard and Betsy Crocker. 
Adonijah F. Bradford and Sarah Dolbeare. 
Thomas Davis and Lettis Miner. 

Samuel Bradford and Abigail Dolbeare. 
John Smith and Caroline Chester. 
James Sterling and Mabel Cliester. 

William Bradfoi'd and Parthenia Bradford. 

Maynard and Martlia Cha[)man. 

William Hougliton and Olive Chester. 
Andrew Griswfdd and Lois Manwarinor. 



George Dolbeare and Sarah Bradford. 
Alpheas Chapman and Elizabeth Allen, 
James Fitch and Abigail Fox. 
Daniel Baker and Sarah Raymond. 
Frederick Rogers and Desire Vibber. 
David Chester and Pruda Fox. 
Samuel Wauket and Hannah Ashbo. 



Whipple and Rlioda Bill. 



Fitch Comstock and Betsey Fitch, 



Notes. 



The Captuke of General Prescott. — The Williams 
Family. — In looking over the 1891 April number of this 
Magazine, I noticed on page 102 that one of the volunteers 
under -the command of Col. Barton, who captured Gen. 
Prescott in 1777, bore the name of Charles Hassett. 
In a note appended to page 104, this name is changed to 
Charles Havett, neither of which was his real name. His 
name was Charles Hewitt, the oldest son of Charles and 
Hannah (Stanton) Hewitt, born in Stonington, now North 
Stonington, Ct, August 16th, 1757 ; died unmarried Jan- 
uary ISth, 1780. 

In the same number I notice on page 85, that I am quoted 
as an authorit}^ for saying that Priscillia Williams, the young- 
est daughter of Eleazer Williams and wife, Mary (Hyde) 
Williams, married David Lester, who was born Nov. 8, 1706. 
He was the son of John Lester and wife, Hannah Carpenter ; 
grandson of Andrew Lester and wife, Hannah Fox ; and 
great grandson of Andrew and Barbary Lester, and married 
Priscilla Williams, May 17th, 1738. They became the pa- 
rents of but one child, Priscilla Lester, born March 16th, 
1739, and married Jonathan Wheeler, son of Jonathan and 
Esther (Denison) Wheeler, grandson of Richard and Pru- 
dence (Payson) Wheeler, great grandson of Isaac and 
Martha (Park) Wheeler, great, great grandson of Thomas 
and Mary Weeeler, April 29th, 1756. 

CHILDREN : 

Lester Wheeler, born July 21, 1757, and married Eu- 
nice Bailey, Feb. 9, 1774. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 217 

Jonathan Wheeler, bom Oct. 7, 1761, and married 
Thankful Stanton, Dec. 29, 1789. 

Elisha Wheeler, born June 3, 1764, and married Lois 
York, March 30, 1786. 

Eleazer Wheeler, born Nov. 16, 1771, and married 
Martha Ingraham, Dec. 12, 1790. 

Martha Wheeler, born October 29, 1774. 

On page 84 of said number it appears that John Williams, 
son of John and Martha (Wheeler) Williams, married for his 
second wife, Mary, widow of Christopher Helme of Kings- 
ton, R. I., and for his third wife, Patience. This is an error. 
There were two children by his second wife, Edward Wil- 
liams, baptized July 27, 1740, and Mar}^ Williams, baptized 
January 25, 1741. 

His second wife died Dec. 3, 1740. For his third wife he 
married Mrs. Prudence Potter of. Portsmouth, R. I., Nov. 21, 
1741, and died Dec. 3, 1761. His third wife died September 
25, 1762. 

Richard A. Wheeler. 

A Riot at East Green^wicii, R. L, 1774. — A serious 
affair* took place at East Greenwich, R. I., September 13, 
1774, requiring military aid from Providence to restore peace. 
Stephen Arnold, Esq., of Warwick, a Judge of tlie Court of 
Common Pleas, was unjustly chai-ged witli Tory principles, 
and hung in effigy at East Greenwich. A mob of several 
hundred people from Warwick threatened to destroy the 
village in revenge for the insult put upon their townsman. 
The Governor ordered the cadets and Light Infantry to the 
scene of action, to support tlie sheriff. A parley ensued 
which resulted in Arnold's making a written acknowledg- 
ment of his wrong. This declai-ation was publicly read by 
him, after which both of the excited crowds dispersed and 



218 MA(JAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

tlie soldiers returned home. Tlic following from the Provi- 
denee Giizette gives an account of the riot : 

"At 2 o'clock in the morning, on Tuesday last, an express 
arrived in tliis town, from East Greenwich, in the county of 
Kent, with advice that a mob was raised, consisting of some 
Inindreds of pe()i)le, who threatened, and were hourly ex- 
})ecte(l to come and destroy said town of East Greenwich, in 
order to show their resentment of the injury which they said 
liad been offered to Stephen Arnold, of Warwick, Esq., one 
of the justices of the inferior court of common pleas in that 
county, who had been charged with industriously propaga- 
ting principles unfriendly to American liberty, and had been 
hung in effigy by some of the people at East Greenwich. 

This intelligence was immediately communicated to His 
Honor the Deputy Governor, who ordered the sheriff, with 
tlie companies of cadets and Light Infantry of this town, 
and others of the militia, to arm themselves, and proceed im- 
mediately to East Greenwich, to assist the sheriff of said 
county in dispersing said mob. 

The companies of militia accordingly armed, marched im- 
mediately, and arrived there by 9 o'clock the same morning, 
where a committee was appointed and sent to the mob, about 
two miles distant from the town, to warn them of the bad 
consequences of their unlawful proceedings, and to demand 
some of the principal persons among them, to come immedi- 
ately into town and settle the affair. 

Whereupon, the said Stephen Arnold, Esq., and some oth- 
ers, came from the mob and met the militia; and a great 
number of people convened at the court house, where, after 
being made acquainted with their resolute determination, he 
signed the following declaration and confession : 

Confession. 

'Whereas, I, the subscriber, having lately in this town, 
received great indignity by being hung in Q^gj, by some evil 
minded persons, to me unknown; and from many reports 
which have been circulated in the country, I was led to thiuk 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 219 

my person and family unsafe ; and being actuated by the 
motives of fear and resentment, without maturely considering 
the consequences, have been concerned, by officiating with 
divers people of this country, with the intention of repairing 
to this town, and making a declaration of that right, which, 
as a subject, I apprehended I was entitled to. 

And whereas, the said assembly was unlawful, which hath 
occasioned much fear and distress to the inhabitants of this 
town in particular, and many others, in general ; for all which 
I do hereby express my hearty sorrow, and wish to obtain the 
favorable opinion of this public assembly ; especially as I am 
a friend to the liberty of my country, and disapprove of those 
measures which have been calculated to tax America without 
her consent. Stephen Arnold. 

East Greenwich, September 13, 1774. 
P. S. I do further declare, that I will discourage to the 
utmost of my power, all such unlawful assemblies for the 
future, and that already assembled in particular. 

Stephen Arnold.' " 

. The United Train of Artillery, of Providence, R. L, 
Celebrates tfie Adoption of the Federal Constitu- 
tion BY Six States, in 1788. — The annual election of offi- 
cers to command the United Train of Artillery of 
the Town of Providence, R. I., took place on Monda3s 
April 28, 1788. "The day was ushered in by a discharge of 
Six Cannon, in lionour of the Six States which had adopted 
the Federal Constitution. In the forenoon, the Company 
paraded in complete uniform, and at 12 o'clock fired 13 
cannon in honour of the United States. At half-past one they 
partook of an entertainment at Mr. James Green's. After 
dinner the following toasts were drank, viz : 

1. Liberty without licentiousness. 

2. May the States be convinced that tlieir safety lies in a 
well-regulated militia. 

3. May the stripes in the flag teach us to hold the staff 
in our own hands. 



220 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND PIISTORY. 

4. May wc iiovor have a War witliout a WASHINGTON. 

5. May wc never liave a Shays v^^itliout a LINCOLN. 

6. May wc never have money without a benevolent heart. 

7. May we never have poverty without hope. 

8. May wc never have a parson without a parish. 

9. May we never have cannon without powder. 

10. May we never have a party without one side being 
right. 

11. May every prodigal be the son of a miser. 

12. May the girls never have cause to mourn with Jep- 
thah's daugliter. 

13. May the discipline of the militia supersede the neces- 
sity of a standing army." 

Rhode Island and the Constitution. — A letter to the 
Salem Gazette, dated Pawtuxet, R. I., June 1, 1790, says : 
"Last Saturday evening, as some boys were in a small boat 
fishing near Potawamscot (?) at the mouth of Pawtuxet 
river, a fine, plump Salmon weighing exactly Thirteen 
Pounds, leaped from the river into the boat. As the cir- 
cumstance was rather uncommon for a fish of its own accord 
to spring from its native element into a boat, on the boys' 
return it occasioned some conversation in the neighborhood. 
But what was the sensation excited, the next day, when the 
news of the adoption of the Constitution arrived, and on 
comparing the time., it appeared that the very time that the 
salmon leaped into the boat was the moment that the Presi- 
dejit announced to the Convention at Newport that by their 
votes they had ratified the Constitution /" 

Query. — Are salmon now taken in the same locality? 

In this connection it may be said that nowhere in the 
country were to be found more patriotic men than in Provi- 
dence and Newport, but for a time ignorant or prejudiced 
politicians obtained in a measure the ascendancy in Rhode 
Island at the time of the adoption of the new Constitution 
by the other States, so that it was not until the next year 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 221 

that it was ratified in the State. This fact appears very 
clearly from letters and papers Avritten at the time. 

Salem, Mass. H. M. B. 

. HoAG, HoEG, HoEGG. — I am compiling a genealogy of the 
Hoag family, and any one having information concerning the 
name is kindly requested to correspond with me. A copy of 
any record will be gladly received. The first family settled 
near Hampton, N. H., about 1650, and became members of 
the Quaker society. 

Can give information concerning the following : — Emery, 
Dow, Goodwin, Swett, Nichols, Springer, Hunt, Jenkins and 
others. 

Lockport, N. Y. Charles A. Hoag. 

Dr. Asa Messer.— Dr. Asa Messer was born in Methuen, 
Mass., May 31, 1769, and died in Providence, R. I., Oct. 11. 
1836. He was the third president of Brown Universitj-, 
and held that important position from 1803 to 1827. 

In gathering facts for the genealogy of the Messers, I be- 
came interested to learn all I could about the doctor and if pos- 
sible secure a portrait of him. On inquir}^ it Vas discovered 
that the third president of tliat institution of learning was 
not represented among the portraits adorning the walls of 
any of its lialls, while portraits of all the other presidents 
are there. 

A photograph negative of his profile was found in posses- 
sion of a Providence pliotographer, and several copies secured. 

While tliis class of })ictures are very unsatisfactory, it was 
the best that could be had. 

During the investigation it was discovered that a half life- 
size portrait was in existence, painted by an artist by the name 
of Lincoln, from a miniature painted from life. Soon after 
the miniature was returned to its owners, their dwelling was 
destroyed by fire, as was also tlie doctor's picture. 

This portrait is now the pro[)erty of Mr. Granvill Brown of 
Providence; it was painted for his father. It would seem that 
it s'liould be with the other presidents of that institution, and 
it is hoped measures will be taken to place it among them. 

M. H. Messer. 



Queries. 

f4istorical. 

44. The "Paul Jones." — Can any one give me the time 
(date) tliat the "Paul Jones," a sailing vessel, plied between 
London, England and Portsmouth, N. H.? Has any passen- 
ger list of tlie Paul Jones been preserved? 

Butte, Montana. L. E. Holmes, M. D. 

45. Diary of Parson Hasey. — In my search among 
New England church records I frequently hnd mention made 
of the Diary of Parson Hasey. He was, in 1785, rector of 
some church in Lebanon, Maine. Can any one inform me if 
this diary is still to be seen? Has it been published? Some 
account of the Parson would certainly be interesting. Q. 

46. Early ^German Emigration to New England. — 
I am much interested in the early emigration of Germans to 
the American Colonies. Was there any considerable settle- 
ment of this class of people in New England before 1750? 

M. 

47. The First Church Service in New England.—- 
The first church service of the Pilgrim Colony is put down 
as a notable event, but I have often seen it stated that it was 
not the first in New England by English settlers. It is said 
that the first church service was held at Calais, Maine, in 
1605 and that two years later an Episcopal service was held 
at Fort Popham. Where can I find a published account of 
early church services? Facts relating to the services above 
mentioned would be interesting reading. Will not some one 
look into this matter. B. T. A. 

48. Some Interesting English Queries. — 1. In Miss 
Agnes Strickland's "Lives of the Queens of England" she 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 223 

says, "Elizabeth had six Ladies of honour in her household at 
Hatfield whose names are celebrated by Sir John Harrington, 
in a complimentary poem which he addressed that Princess 
early in Mary's reign — "He proceeds to praise — Lady Will- 
oughby for being a laurel instead of a willow" — Where can 
this poem be found? Will some one who has it, kindly give 
the quotation in regard to Margaret Willoughby? 2. Sir 
Walter Scott in Ivanhoe describes Richard Coeur de Lion as 
returning to England in disguise after his imprisonment in 
Austria and bearing the device of a fetterlock. Is it a fact 
of history that he bore the device? If so, is it supposed to 
have had reference to his captivity? 3. When the Princess, 
[afterwards Queen] was imprisoned by her sister Queen Mary 
did she ever u^ the device of a padlock? 4. Col. William 
Willoughby of Kent, born about 1588, of the British Navj^ 
from 1648 till his death in 1651; and his son Francis Wil- 
loughby his successor in office, afterwards member of Parlia- 
ment and De])uty-Governor of Massachusetts bore the arms 
of the early Willouglil)y de Eresbys; or fretty azure, crest a 
lion's head (formerly a bat's) couped at the slioulders, be- 
tween two wings expanded. Their descendants in America 
have relics and traditions which, in connection with the facts 
of English history offer strong circumstantial evidence which 
is accepted by the representatives of the families of Willoug- 
bys De Eresby and MoUaton as sliowing that Col. William 
Willoug]i})y belonged to the De Eresby line in one of the 
, early generations after the marriage of Robert Willougliby of 
Bore Place, Kent (son of Sir Thomas Chief Justice, grandson 
of Sir Christoplier Baron Willoughby De Eresby) to Dorothy 
daughter of Sir Edward Willoughby of Wolhxnton. Can 
there be found pedigrees giving all the descendants of Robert 
and Dorotliy Willougliby for three generations? What sons 
had they besides Thomas Sheriff of Kent? What grandsons 
besides Sir Pci'cival who married Bridget, eldest (hiughtcr of 
Sir Francis Willoughby of WoUaton, and Edward who mar- 
ried Winifred a younger daughter of Sir Francis? Did either 
of these brothers have a son William? Can a William, born 



224 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOTIY. 

about 1588 be found in any generation of the family existing 
before tliat date? 'J'hc^ facts desired are very important to 
Mr. and Mrs. P^dward Elbridge Salisbury of New Haven, 
Conuecticut, in tlie preparation of a large and valuable work 
of Histories and Genealogies now nearly completed. 



Genealogical. • 

49. Cartwright Family of Nantucket. — Understand- 
ing tliat there exists different statements, as to the parentage 
of Udward Cartwright of Nantucket, (1660,) will all who 
possess any traditional or written information of the names 
of the parents of this '•'-Edward C" and where they may 
claim that he was born, please address 

Lansing, Mich. Geo. M. Cartwright. 

50. Tompkins. — Can any one give facts relating to the 
ancestr}^ of Nathaniel Tompkins of Rhode Island, who mar- 
ried Elizabeth Allen, Jan, 15, 1671. He died 1724. His 
children were: 

I. Elizabeth, born , died 1729, married William 

Ladd, Feb. 17, 1696- 
II. Nathaniel, born Dec. 31, 1676, died 1748, 

III. Mary, born Sept, 16, 1677. 

IV. Priscilla, born May 24, 1679, died Dec. 11, 1732, 

married 1703, Samuel Lyndon. 
V. Samuel, born May 24, 1681, died May 1760, married 
Sarah Coe. 
YI. Mercy, born Oct. 20, 1685, married William* Bo wditch 
VII. Sarah, married Benjamin Gilford. 
VIH. Rebecca. 

IX. Hannah, married Timothy Gifford. 
The undersigned would like to know when and where 
Natlianiel Tompkins was born. Information relative to his 
children also desired. 

Vineland, N. J. Marion L. ToMPKiNS. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 225 

51. Taylor, Halcomb, Whitlock. — Can any one give 
me information in regard to an Eli Halcomb who married 
Esther Taylor. She was born at Danbury, Conn., about 1770. 
They are said to have had a daughi-er Roxy. Information is 
also wanted of one Hezekiah Whitlock who married Naomi 
Taylor, who was born at Danbury, Conn., probably about 
1772, (was a sister of the above Esther). They are said to have 
removed to Vt., somewhere near Whitehall. The writer has 
been engaged for ten years in collecting material for a 
genealogy of the descendants of John Taylor, of Windsor, 
Conn., 1639. Many of this family settled at Norwich, Wilton, 
Danbury, New Milford and other towns in Fairfield Co., 
Conn. I should be pleased to exchange information with any 
who are interested in such matter. 

Orange^ Mass. W. O. Taylor. 

52. SissON. — Joseph Sisson of Newport, R. I., died 1836 
or 1837. He had sons Peleg and Benjamin. Peleg left 
Newport in 1812, being eighteen years old. A descendant 
of his desires to connect Joseph Sisson above named with the 
Sisson genealogy as published by J. O. Austin. The under- 
signed would be glad to correspond with anyone having in- 
formation bearing on the subject. 

aS'^. Annes Churchy Lowell^ Mass. Rev. Wilson Waters. 

53. Clarke. — Benjamin Clarke, of New Castle, N. H., 
was a taxpayer there in 1719. He married Nov. 30, 1720, 
Jane, daughter of William and Margery Pepperell, and had 
William and Benjamin. Whose son was Benjamin Sr., and 
when did he die? XX. 

54. Weare, Lawton. — Elias-^ Weare (sometimes Ware, 
Wier),born Oct. 20,1695 in Boston,son of Daniel^ and Hannah 
(Borden) Weare of York, Me., and Boston, and grandson of 
Peter^ Weare of York, Me., a prominent man in the Province, 
describes himself about 1725 as "of Rhode Island, merchant". 
(York Co., (Me.), deed XH 284). He entered the intention 



22G MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOHY. 

of inaiTiao-e in Boston, 21 Jnne,1722 with Elizabeth Laughton 
"of Ivhodc Ishmd" and probably moved there. Information 
wanted as to her parentage and his descendants, if any. 
Vineyard Haven, Mass. Charles E. Banks, M. D. 

55. Silsbee. — Nathaniel Silsbee, a graduate of Harvard 
College, in 1824, settled in Salem, Mass. He was, I think, 
a member of the Massachusetts Legislature in 1833. Who 
were his parents, and what was the date of his birth and 
death. T. 

56. Clapp. — Rev. Dexter Clapp, son of Ralph and Fanny 
Clapp, of Westhampton, Mass., born July 15, 1816, died 

July 26, 1868. His wife was Susan — ? What was 

the maiden name of his mother ? Q. 

57. Elton.— Salmon Hurlbut Elton, born April 28, 1768, 
son of Ebenezer and Rhoda (Hurlbut) Elton, married Lydia 
Goodwin. He is supposed to have been born in Middletown, 
Conn. What is the date of his death? W. P. B. 



{Replies. 
31. Pastors, Teachers and Elders of the New 
England Churches. — The distinction between the Pastor 
and the Teacher of the early New England churches is de- 
fined in a letter of several of their ministers in August, 1639, 
in answer to inquiries of ministers in England, as follows : 
"Pastor and Teacher have various duties in common. Both 
preach by way of doctrine and application, and administer 
the seals. Still there is a difference between them. The 
Teacher 'is principally to attend upon points of knowledge 
and doctrine, though not without application,' and therefor 
his work is thus expressed, 'let him attend on teaching ;' but 
the pastor's principal duty is to preach on 'points of practice, 
though not without doctrine, and hence his work is 'to attend 
on exhortation.' " The office of Ruling Elder in the early 
New England churches is thus defined by John Cotton : 
"The office of Ruling Elder is to assist the Pastors and 
Teachers in diligent attendance to all other acts of rule be- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 227 

sides exhortation and doctrine, as becomes good stewards of 
the household of God." The above, in answer to our San- 
Francisco correspondent's query, is taken from the Historical 
Catalogue of the first church in Hartford, Conn. The sub- 
ject is an interesting one, and calls for a more definite and 
detailed answer. Will not some of our readers give us fur- 
ther information? — [Ed. 

42. Ellery-Keith. — Susanna, daughter of Wm. Keith, 
was born January 13, 1739-40. The date of her marriage 
with William Ellery is .given, in the published records of the 
First church, of Hartford, as 1761. Her parents were Wil 
liam Keith and Mrs. Marian Lawrence. They were married 
at Hartford, Nov. 16, 1738. Mrs. William Ellery was buried 
in the Centre Church burying-ground, at Hartford. Her 
first husband was Capt. John Lawrence, of Jersey, England. 
Her father was John 'Beauchamp, born 1652, died Nov. 14, 

1740. Her mother Margaret died Dec. 8, 1727, age 

59. 

Fittsfield. Mass. Rollin H. Cooke. 



The Right of Franchise during the early history of 
the colony of Massachusetts was confined to the freemen ; 
afterwards in tlie election of deputies, and its management of 
town affairs, other persons were allowed to vote ; and so 
general was the franchise, that in some tow^ns a majority of 
voters were not freemen. In 1669 none were allowed to vote 
in town affairs but freemen, or freeholders of twenty pounds 
ratable estate. The General Court alone admitted freemen, 
but tlie same was often done on the recommendations of the 
towns, and for many years no special qualifications were re- 
quired, but in 1671 it was provided that none should be ad- 
mitted l)ut such as were twenty-one years of age "and have 
the testimony of their neighbors that they are of sober and 
peaceable conversation, orthodox in the fundamentals of re- 
ligion, and such as have also twenty pounds of ratable estate 
in the colony." 



The Coddington School Lands, 

Braintree, Massachusetts. 



^N November, 1885, Mr. Samuel A. Bates, for many 
llj I years now the town-clerk of Braintree, printed in the 
'i I Randolph Register an article relating to the circum- 
stances under which the Coddington school lands, as 
they are called, came into the possession of the original town 
of Braintree. The question has a certain degree of interest, 
as the Mt. Wollaston cemetery is now on one portion of these 
lands, as the Quincy Alms-house is upon another portion of 
them. 

Mr. Bates is unquestionably better informed than any one 
else now living on all antiquarian and traditional matters 
relating to the original town of Braintree ; and it is cause for 
serious regret that his address on the 250th anniversary of 
the incorporation of the town has not been published in form 
for preservation. It should yet be done ; and, when it is 
done, opportuidty should be afforded Mr. Bates to incorpo- 
rate in an appendix to the address much of that curious and 
valuable local information he possesses, which otherwise bids 
fair to die with him. Quincy has done its share in this line, 
and it is now the turn of Braintree to make a valuable addi- 
tion to its printed record in the local celebrations of 1858, 
1861 and 1876. The 250th anniversary ought to be marked 
by a mile-stone » 

Until Mr. Bates printed his article on the subject, which 
was reprinted in the Patriot of December 5th, 1885, it had 
always been assumed that the so-called "school lands" were a 
gift from William Coddington to the town of Braintree,— its 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 229 

earliest educational endowment. The tradition was old and 
unbroken. It first appears in a foot-note on page 2:^ of the 
Rev. John Hancock's century sermons, preached by him in 
the North Precinct meeting house on the 16th of September, 
1739. Mr. Hancock there refers to Coddington as ''the mu- 
nificent donor of our school lands, which now rent at 142 Z., 
from which this town has reaped great benefit in good schools 
for many years past." A century later Dr. Lunt in his two 
discourses on the 200th anniversary of the first church 
referred to Coddington (p. 22), and, in an appendix (F. pp. 
73-5) to the printed copy of his discourses quoted Mr. Han- 
cock's language as above, adding that, for the reason stated, 
Coddington was "one who deserves to be remembered by the 
inhabitants of this place." In like manner in 1858, Charles 
Francis Adams said (p. 25) in an address delivered at the 
inauguration of the present Braintree Town-hall, "Codding- 
ton's name is therefore entitled to be inscribed on the hearts 
of the people as that of their earliest benefactor.'^ In a brief 
memoir of Edmund Quincy (N. E. Hist. & Gen. Reg., April, 
1884) the late Miss E. S. Quincy, referring to Coddington, 
says: ''He sold his Mt. Wollaston estate to Edward [Wil- 
liam ?] Tyng, and gave the rest of his lands to the town of 
Braintree." Finally, Dr. Pattee in his history of the town 
(pp. 315-17) uses the following language : 

"On the worn and tattered first page of the old Braintree 
town records, we find the copy of a conveyance, which gave 
to Braintree (now Quincy) a large tract of territory, the in- 
come of which has ever since been held for the benefit of the 
public schools. Who was this earliest benefactor ? It was 
Mr. William Coddington, a man who deserves to be remem- 
bered by the present and future inhabitants of the town. 
Mr. Coddington was a man of high respectability and of good 
intellect, but because he dared to advocate a religious doc- 
trine which to-day would be considered but a common belief, 
he was forced to leave the colony. Mr. (Coddington, soon 
after he removed to Rhode Island, through his agent, Mr. 
Richard Wriglit, gave his large landed estate, comprising 



230 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

wliiit is now the town farm, the Mount Wollaston Cemetery, 
and meadow land at Rock Island, to the town of Braintree 
for the ])urpose of establishing and supporting the public 
scliools in order that future generations might reap the ben- 
efit of a liberal education, and thus see the folly of ex-com- 
municating from society individuals for their honest religious 
opinions. The income of this munificent bequest has been 
used to advance the interest of education in this town from 
that time to this." 

A tradition a century and a half old, relating to an impor- 
tant town transaction which occurred only two hundred and 
fifty years ago, is certainly entitled to respect ; especially 
when it originates with so excellent an authority on a matter 
of this sort as the Rev. John Hancock. An oral tradition, 
also, has during recent years lingered about the town, for 
which the late William S. Morton was, 1 believe, largely re- 
sponsible, that among the ancient papers in the Suffolk reg- 
istry was one containing a reference to Coddington's deed of 
gift, — in which document the donor expressed in language 
of much strength a hope that his gift might produce on the 
descendants of those then inhabiting what is now Quincy, 
some such effects as that indicated in Dr. Pattee's text. But 
this phase of the tradition could probably be traced to a care- 
less, unconsidered statement in one of the notes to Whitney's 
History of Quincy (p. 20.), to the effect that "a descendant 
of this Coddington afterwards, gave certain portions of land 
lying towards Mt. Wollaston to the town of Braintree for the 
support of schools, as he said, 'that the next generation 
might not be as ignorant as the present is.' " 

In his article in the Randolph Register, Mr. Bates ques- 
tioned the accuracy of the whole tradition, both written and 
oral, giving his reasons for so doing, and asserting finally 
that "the only ground on which the name of the Coddington 
fund can be applied to it is that the land was given by the 
town of Boston to William Coddington, who was afterwards 
driven from the colony for his adherence to and sympathy 
with Antinomian sentiments, that the courts adjudged that 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 231 

Richard Wright, the lawful attorney of 'William Coddington, 
should convey to the town of Braintree said land, and that 
the said town should pay for the same the sum of X98." 

Mr. Don Gleason Hill, of Dedham, an experienced con- 
veyancer as well as an accomplished antiquarian, has recently 
at my request made a careful examination of all the publica- 
tions and papers on record bearing on this question. As the 
result of so doing he confirms Mr. Bates' conclusions in every 
respect, finding no basis whatever for Mr. Hancock's state- 
ment or Dr. Pattee's more recent surmises. The whole 
transaction is now enveloped in obscurity ; but, as nearly as 
can be ascertained from the records and the few additional 
data which have come to light, the facts in relation to the 
Coddington school lands were somewhat as follows : The 
original undivided grant from the town of Boston to William 
Coddington and Edmund Quincy was made on the 14th of 
Dec. 1635, and covered many liujidred acres, including the 
peninsular of Germantown, the present almshouse grounds 
and the Mt. Wollaston cemetery, the Mt. Wallaston farm, the 
Merry Mount park, and the Sailors' Home property, and also 
the former Quincy farm, down to what was formerly known as 
*'the farms," (Adams Braintree Address, 1858, p. 57). Mr. 
Coddington is said to have built a house within the limits of 
what is now the Merry Mount park, but the grant remained 
undivided until 1636. Edmund Quincy died some time in 
1635, and the next year a division was made, the eastern por- 
tion of the grant, including the present Mt. Wollaston farm 
and wliat subsequently became known as the ''school lands" 
or town farm, falling to the share of Coddington, 

The so-called Antinomian controversy raged in 1636 and 
culminated at the close of 1637, when the adiierents of Mrs. 
Hutchinson were in November ordered by name to bring in 
their arms and deliver them up to Capt. Robert Keayne. 
Siding as he did with the Antinomian party, Coddington, 
though not actually exiled, left Boston in April, 1638, going 
to Rhode Island, where he afterwards lived until his death in 
1678. At the time of his removal he was a man of thii'ty- 



232 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

seven years of age, and writing to Gov. Wintlirop two years 
afterwards lie said: "What niyselfe and wife and family did 
induer in that renioveall, I wish neither you nor yours may 
ever be put unto.") IV Mass. Hist. Soc. ColL vi. 314.) There 
is, nevertheless, no ground whatever for Dr. Pattee's asser- 
tion that Coddington was forced to leave the colony "because 
he dared to advocate a religious doctrine, which to-day would 
be considered a common belief." As to the theological issues 
involved in the Antinomian controversy, so far from being on 
one side or the other "considered a common belief" now, it is 
safe to say, that not a human being alive so receives them ; 
they are antiquated, abandoned and forgotten. So far as the 
other issues are concerned, Coddington said all there is now 
to say when in 1640 he wrote to Winthrop referring to them : 
"I well approve of a speech of one of note amongst you, that 
we were in a heat and chafed, and were all of us to blame ; in 
our strife, we had foi^gotten we were brethren-" (lb. 317). 
None the less, Coddington in his anger went into exile, 
whether in his case voluntary or not, "upon 14 dayes tyme" 
(lb. 314) leaving his affairs in the Massachusetts colony in a 
very unsettled condition. So far as his farm was concerned, 
the next year (1639) dating from Newport, on April 9, he 
sold, together with his house in Boston, to William Tynge, 
a merchant, five hundred and twenty acres of land at Mt. 
Wollaston, reserving a right of shelter for thirty head of 
cattle for the coming winter. (Lechford, Note Book, 62,66). 
The land thus conveyed at Mt. Wollaston was apparently not 
at once delivered, but subsequently, on the 15th and 16th of 
October following, another conveyance was made of a portion 
of it through William Cheeseborough, assignee of Codding- 
ton, to Richard Wright and by him to Tynge, (Suffolk 
Deeds, i. 26). A large tract of land still remained uncon- 
veyed, a portion of which subsequently became the Braintree 
School lands ; while the portion sold to Tynge, known as the 
Mt. Wollaston farm, was at his death (1661) left by him to 
his daughter, Mrs. Shepard, and is still in the hands of her 
descendants. — {Hist, of Norfolk County, 308-9). 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 233 

Recurring now to the other still unconveyed portion of the 
Coddington grant, it would seem to have been the original 
intention of Coddington to include this also in the sale to 
Tynge, but, apparently, the so doing was prevented by legal 
proceedings then pending based on a claim to a deed of the 
land on the part of those living in the neighborhood, in pur- 
suance of some agreement or "promise" concerning it alleged 
to have been made by Coddington. The negotiation for the 
sale to Tynge was in 1639 ; the town of Braintree was incor- 
porated on the 16th of May, 1640 ; and on the 25tli of August 
1640, three months afterwards, Coddington writes to Win- 
throp from Newport, as follows: — 'T was advised by letter 
first out of the Bay that the Governor, and the Deputy and 
other of the magistrates had advised and encouraged the 
town of Braintree to commence a suit against me. After, I 
received a note from the Governor, that it was for a promise. 
I know nothing of it, in regard whereof I desire that the 
Plaintiffs may put in their complaint in answer, and that I 
may have time given to put in my defence."— (IV. Mass. 
Hist. Soc. Coll. vi. 317). 

No trace of the suit here referred to can be found in the 
court or other archives: but, on the first page of the Brain- 
tree records, the school lands are spoken of as "recovered" of 
Coddington, and the copy of a conveyance from Coddington's 
attorney, Richard Wright, beai's date July 10, 1640. The 
land conveyed was, apparently, one hundred and hfty- three 
acres, lying in three parcels, one of seventy-five, another of 
forty, and a third of twenty-eight acres, and the considera- 
tion paid was X98 besides some ''shillings and eight pence"; 
the mutilated hrst page of the book of records adds ''being 
^ * * ground allowed by the Court to * * * of Braintree 
out of the goods of * * Coddington" * * *. , 

The legitimate inference from the above data is that Cod- 
dington agreed in 1639 to sell his farm at Mt. Wollastou to 
Tynge; but, owing to some legal proceedings based on an 
alleged promise of his, was unable to convey title to the 
whole. He did convey title to a portion of it on the 16th of 



234 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOllY 

October, 1(339, and the litigation in regard to the baLance 
came to a ch)se in June, 1640; so that at the very time in 
August, 1640, tliat Coddington was writing from Newport to 
Wintlirop professing ignorance of the grounds on which suit 
liad been brought against him, his agent ill Massachusetts, 
Richard Wright, had already, on June 5th, sold the land to 
the town of Braintree, on some terms and at a price ''allowed 
by the Courte." The suit, whatever it was, seems, therefore, 
to liave been decided against Coddington before he had time 
to file any answer to the town's demand. 

Through the action of the court, as appears from the frag- 
nnents of the conveyance still to be deciphered on the first 
page of the town records, Braintree "recovered of Mr. Cod- 
dington" a portion of the land then in Richard Wright's legal 
possession, tlie Court at the same time protecting Wright by 
ordering payment to be made to him of a specified sum, pre- 
sumably the consideration on which the alleged "promise" of 
Coddington was made. The land thus acquired was then 
devoted to the support of the town's school. Another portion 
of the grant seems under this action of the court to have been 
released from litigation, and this portion was subsequently 
(November 10, 1641) conveyed, in accordance with the New- 
port deed of April 9, 1639, by Wright to Cheeseborough and 
by him to Tynge. (Suffolk Deeds, i, 26). The whole amount 
finally getting to Tynge being some 400 acres while 153 were 
conveyed to the town. 

Now as to the adequacy of the consideration paid by the 
town to Wright: Coddington's sale to Tynge covered his 
brick dwelling-house in Boston, standing on what is now 
Washington street, opposite Dock Square {Mem. Rut. of 
Boston ii. xxi) together with his garden, orchard, &c, with 
sundry lands, and five hundred acres at Mt. Wollaston all 
for the price of £1300 sterling. The town paid Wright for 
about one third of the Mt. Wollaston property. The day 
after the sale to Tynge of 9th April, 1639, Tynge gave Cod- 
dington a mortgage on the Mt. Wollaston land and buildings 
to secure payment of £800. (i^eohiovd, Mte-hooJc, H) and 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 235 

the estate there was probably valued at not less than that 
sum. The town-lands subsequently "recovered" were in 
acreage nearly one third of the whole, but did not include 
house or out-buildings. Estimating this portion in value at 
one quarter of the whole, it represented in the sale to Tynge 
X200. The amount paid for it under tlie order of the Court 
was less than <£100. Coddington's alleged "promise" may 
have been to sell it to the town for this sum, being about 
half its known value. 

Subsequently, but not until 1667, the original deed of Cod- 
dington to T3aige, of April 9, 1639, was placed on record in 
Boston by Thomas Brattle, Tynge's son-in-law. (^Suffolk 
Deeds, v. 173.) It also appears that, while Wright's deed to 
the town bore date June 10th, 1610, he did not make formal 
delivery and seisin until May, 1611. (Bralntree Records, 1- 
2) From which fact it would appear that Tynge, having 
knowledge of the suit brought by the town did not rely for 
his title on Coddington's deed of April, 1639, and that 
Wright, though he gave a deed of the land at Mt.. WoUaston 
to the town in June, 1640, in accordance with the order of 
the Court, deferred making any formal delivery of the 
property until the following May. During the intervening 
eleven months it is fair to presume he consulted with his 
principal, Coddington, and may have secured iiis assent to 
the final arrangement and transfers both to Tynge and the 
town. 

Thus it would seem that the Coddington school lands 
wei'e not a voluntary gift from William Coddington to tlie 
infant town of Braintree; but that, he, having contracted to 
sell them to another party, was, to his extreme discontent, 
prevented from so doing by legal proceedings, the character 
of which cannot now be ascertained. The land then was 
conveyed to the town by Coddington's agent, holding a legal 
title to them, and he received in payment therefor a sum of 
money, fixed by an order of the Court, and representing 
about half of their market value. 

But it still remains to account for the tradition of a free 



236 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

gift; nor is tliis an easy thing to do. That tradition cannot 
ha snnunarily dismissed as wholly without foundation, for 
almost invariably tliere is some basis for every general and 
long accepted popular belief as to occurrences in the past; 
and, moreover, in this particular case, the belief is traced to 
the Rev. John Hancock, who, in giving form to it, not only 
stated what was current a century and a half ago, but, while 
so doing, had before him the iii'st volume of Braintree records, 
which had been filled and laid aside only eight years before, 
and since flancock's settlement in the town. It is not prob- 
able that the earlier pages of that volume had then become 
tattered with use, and in them the whole of Wright's deed of 
tlie Coddington lands could have been, and probably had 
been, read by the minister. Certainly the facts set forth in 
those pages must have been known to many persons then 
living; and yet Mr. Hancock referred to Coddington as the 
"munificent donor" of the lands in a matter of course way 
and as if it were a thing of common acceptance. He was 
speaking also of a comparatively recent transaction, for it 
had occurred only eighty-seven years before he came to dwell 
in the town. 

Any explanation of these contradictory circumstances must 
be based on pure surmise. My own surmise is that the claim 
of the town to a deed of a portion of (^oddington's grant, was, 
as he says, in his letter to Gov. Winthrop, based on an 
alleged "promise" on Coddington's part. The Court, acting 
with great promptness and without waiting for Coddington 
to file an answer from his place of exile, approved the claim 
of the town and awarded the land to it. This much we now 
know, for Wright gave a deed of the land to the town as 
"allowed by the Courte," on the 10th of June, 1640, and not 
until the 25th of August did Coddington write to Winthrop 
asking time in the matter. Thus the land was conveyed to 
the town in accordance with Coddington's alleged "promise". 
This much the town knew and remembered; it never knew 
that Coddington wholly denied ever having made any such 
promise, and fully intended to defend against the town's 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 237 

suit. This fact only came to light in 1863, when Codding- 
ton's letter to Winthrop was published by the Massachusetts 
Historical Society. 

Thus the earlier generations of the town's people, including 
the Rev. John Hancock, always supposed that the Court had 
compelled Richard Wright to make good William Codding- 
ton's "promise" as respects those lands, and that Coddington 
was the "donor" of them, while the consideration paid (<£98) 
must have been regarded as partial only. In lapse of years 
the idea of a free "gift obtained general traditionary accep- 
tance. None the less the letter to Winthrop of August 25, 
1640, written three whole months after Wiight's conveyance 
was executed, makes it clear that there was no free gift on 
Coddington's part, but that the land was obtained by the 
town either through a compulsory legal process or through 
the act of an agent confessing a judgment not then author- 
ized, though, possibly, afterwards approved by his principal. 

One of the singular and more unaccountable features of 
the whole transaction is the fact that no trace exists in the 
records of this suit of the town, or action of "the Co arte." 
In 1640-1 there were in Massac 1 1 use tts no distinct judicial 
tribunals in the present sense of the term. The "Courte" 
referred to in the deed from Wright to the representatives of 
Braintree may have been tlie General Court, or Legislature, 
or the Court of Assistants, composed of tlie Magistrates 
chosen by vote at each annual election, or, possibly, tlie 
County Court, which, created in 1639, was also composed of 
certain of the same Magistrates. The case against Codding- 
ton must have been heard and decided before one of these 
tliree tribunals ; but, although after 1639 a careful record of 
the evidence given in every case tried in these coui'ts, as well 
as of the judgments rendered by them, was by law required 
"to be kept to posterity," dilligent search has failed as yet to 
discover any trace of such a record relating to the Bi'aintree 
school lands. This fact opens the way to a very unpleasant 
inference. 



238 



I^lAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



It will 1)0 noticed that in his letter to Winthrop of 25th of 
Ano-ust, 1640, Coddington says that he had been advised 
that "the Governor and the Deputy and other of the magis- 
trates liad advised and encouraged" the suit brought against 
him by Braintree. Dudley was then Governor, and he was | 
a bitter and even vindictive enemy of Coddington and all the 
Antinomian exiles. A narrow minded, harsh man, he was by 
no means scrupulous as to the methods he pursued in crush- 
ino' out heresies. He, also, together with "the deputy and 
other of the magistrates," all enemies of Coddington, com- 
posed the "Courte" which was to decide, and did decide, the 
suit, the bringing of which they "had advised and encour- 
ao-ed." In those davs furthermore it was "the custom for 
suitors to apply privately to the Magistrates who were to try 
their causes, and by an exparte statement, forestall the favor- 
able opinion of their Judges." (Washburn, Judicial His- 
tory, 51) ; a custom some years later prohibited by law. 
While in the absence of any record or direct evidence, it 
would therefore be improper to assert that Coddington was 
judicially despoiled of a portion of his estate at Mt. WoUas- 

ton for the benefit of the town of Br.iintree, all the indica- 
tions point that way. Some corroboration for such an infer- 
ence is also afforded by the fact -that while the deed to the 
town was executed by Coddington's attorney, Wright, on 
the 10th of June, 1640, Wright did not make delivery of the 
land until the following May, and his action was then appa- 
rently part of another transaction through which a valuable 
monopoly in milling was granted him by the town. (Brain- 
tree Records^ 1.) 

Thus, though a highly respectable character and a very 
harshly used man, Coddington's name cannot, so far as ap- 
])eai-s, properly be "inscribed on the hearts of the people as 
that of their earliest benefactor; nor, as a "munificent donor," 
can he longer head the list of those who, first and last, have 
given freely to the support of public education in Braintree 
and its off-spring tow^ns. So far as any record yet discovered 
discloses the facts, he seems to have done what he did under 
com[)ulsion ; if, indeed, he was not judiciall}^ despoiled, with- 
out having been allowed time in which to defend himself. 
— \_Charle8 F. Adams i^i The Quincy Patriot. 



The Adams Family of Groton, Connecticut 



t, t. Y attention lias been called to an erroneous note in 
^'-5 ^ I Allyn's history of the battle of Groton Heights, as 
to the relationship of Nathaniel Adams, one of the 
j^ victims of the massacre at Fort Griswold, Sept. 61 
1781. 

The note will be found on page 260 of the history mentioned 
as follows: "Nathaniel Adams lived in the section of Groton 
known as 'Gungawamp,' where in a thickly-wooded valley is 
a rough uncut slab of granite, upon which are rudel}' en- 
graved the initials N. A. Tradition says this stone was pre- 
pared by Adams previous to his death and after that event, 
in accordance with his desire, it was })laced by his friends at 
his grave. He is said by his descendants to have been at 
one time wealthy, but reduced to straitened circumstances 
by his patriotism, and to have been well known at the time 
as a brother of John Adams, who afterwards became second 
president of the United States." 

On page 137 of the history referred to may be found a 
further reference to Nathaniel Adams, as follows : — "Eliza- 
beth Adams, widow of Nathaniel Adams, 'a cloather,' was 
left with five cliildren under the age of eleven years, a small 
house and a small piece of rocky land under no improvement 
nor worth im})roving, lived wholl}^ by her trade." 

The error in the history which I desire to correct is this : 
Deacon John Adams, father of the president, was born and 
lived in what is now Qnincy, Mass ; the date of his birth 
was Feb. 8, 1691 ; he married Nov. 23, 1784, Susannah Boyls- 
ton of Brookline, Mass., and died May 2-"), 1761. His oidy 
children were three sons, viz. : 



240 JNIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

1. Jolin, Jr., l)om Oct. 19, 1735 ; second president, and 
fatlier of John Quincy Adams, bom July 11, 1767, sixth 
president. 2. Peter Boylston Adams, born Oct. 16, 1738, 
resided in Qnincy. 3. Elihu Adams, born May 29, 1741, re- 
sided in Randolph, Mass. 

It will therefore be seen that President John Adams had 
no brother Nathaniel, and hence the history referred to is in 
error. 

The facts in regard to Nathaniel Adams of Groton are 
tliese. He was born in Groton June 8, 1739. His father's 
name was also Nathaniel and his mother's maiden name 
Ilannali Wheeler^ who were married in Groton Jan. 23, 1731. 

Nathaniel Adams Jr., the Fort Griswold victim, was mar- 
ried in Groton Jan. 4, 1670, to Elizabeth Comstock and had: 
1, Abigail, born Mar. 1, 1771; — 2, Sarah, born Jan. 17, 1773; 
— 3, Elizabeth, born July 18, 1775; — 4, Prentice, born Feb. 
26, 1777. 

It will be observed by the latter note quoted from Allyn's 
history that, as alleged, Nathaniel left five minoi; children 
and if such be the fact, my record of his children, having' 
the names of but four, must be incomplete. 

As to the more remote ancestry of the Groton Adams 
family, I am of the opinion, after some considerable research, 
that Nathaniel Sr., probably the first Adams to settle in 
Groton as originaily bounded, was born about 1704 in Bris- 
tol, R. I., and a son of Edward Adams of that town, born in 
Medfield, Mass., in 1668, who was son of Edward Sr., of 
Braintree and Medfield, Mass., born in England in 1630 and 
the younger of the eight sons of Henry Adams the emigrant 
of Braintree, 1634. 

There were three of the sons of Edward Sr., who settled 
in Bristol or Barrington, R. I., viz: James, born 1761, 
Edward, Jr., born 1668, and William born 1670, and the 
records of the ''Church of Christ" of Bristol, between 1695 
and 1710, show the baptism of an aggregate of seventeen of 
their children (see N. E. Hist, and Gen. Register, Vol. 
XXXIV) many of whom I have been unable as yet. to 
trace. I will be pleased to hear from all who may be inter- 
ested in the m^tt(di\~ Nelson D. Adams^ in Norwich^ Conn., 
Bulletin. 



\ 



Centenarians in New Hampshire. 



± N 1848, Mr. Jacob B. Moore contributed an article for 
H the New York Journal of Commerce, on the Centenari- 
TJ ans of New Hampshire. He estimated that from 1705 
^ to 1840, there had died, in that State, 168 persons who 
had eitlier entered upon their 100th year, or had exceeded a 
complete century. Of this number 101 were females. Few 
sections oE our country, of the same population, have afforded 
so many instances of longevity as New Hampshire. The fol- 
lowing notes from Mr. Morris' record, are interesting : 

The first who completed a century, of whom any account 
is preserved, was Henry Langstaff of Bloody Point, who had 
been 84 years in New England, and who died 18th of July, 
1705, above one hundred years of age. His death was occa- 
sioned by a fall. Rev. Mr. Pike, of Dover, says in his Jour- 
nal, that he was a hale, strong, hearty man, and might have 
lived many years longer, but for the accident which occa- 
sioned his death. 

William Perkins, of New Market, who died in 1732, at the 
age of 116. He was a native of the West of England. Gov. 
Burnett, when on his way to New Hampshire, visited him, 
and examined him closely concerning events of the civil war 
in England. His son died in 1757, aged 87 ; and a great 
grandson died in 1824, at the age of 91. 

William Scoby, of Londonderry, who died in 1754, aged 
110. He was vigorous and active to the close of life. When 
104, he walked from Londonderiy to Portsmouth, 36 miles, 
and back again by another route 25 miles further, in order to 
see how many children his grandchildren's grandchildren 



242 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

lind, for they had been married several years. See Boston 
Weekly Post-Boy, 6th March, 1749. 

Robert Metliii, of Wakefield, who died 5th February, 1787, 
tio-ed 115. He was a native of Scotland, lived many years 
at Portsmouth, where he carried on the business of a baker, 
and was noted as a pedestrian. He used to go on foot to 
Boston, then about 60 miles, performing the distance usually 
in a single day, where, after purchasing his flour, and put- 
ting it on board a coaster, he would walk home on the follow- 
incr day. He was 80 years old when he last performed this 
feat. The journey was thought in those days to be a good 
day's work for a horse. 

John Lovewell, of Dunstable. The time of his death is 
not ascertained, nor his exact age, but he lived to be about 
100 — not 120, as many accounts have it. I have seen a depo- 
sition made by him in 1745, which states his age then to be 
93, and he was not living in 1755. He was a man of vener- 
able appearance, so much so that the Indians regarded him 
with reverence, and never offered to molest him. He was 
father of John Lovewell, commander in the celebrated "Love- 
well's Fight," at Pequawkit. 

Samuel Welch, of Bow, who died 5th April, 1823, in the 
lL3th year of his age. He was born at Kingston, Sept. 1st, 
1710, and is supposed to have been the oldest native of New 
Hampshire, of European descent, who ever died in the State. 
I visited this old man about a month before his decease, and 
spent some hours in conversation with him. On asking him 
if his life had seemed long to him, he answered, "O, no, — 
short — very short !" And yet he spoke of life as one weary 
of its burdens and wishing "to be away." 

The oldest female in New Hampshire, of whose age we 
have any account, was Hannah Belknap, a widow of Ebene- 
zer Belknap, of Atkinson. She died in 1784, at the age of 
107 lacking one month. When 105, she rode from Atkinson 
to Plaistow, on horseback, on a "pillion," behind her son 
Obadiah Belknap. Her husband died at the age of 95. 



Record of Marriages, > 

BY REV. GARDNEH THURSTON, PASTOR OF THE SECOND BAP- 
TIST CHURCH, NEWPORT, R. I. 

1759-1800. 

(Continued from page 153.) 



1771. 




June 


2. 


(( 


16. 


u 


20. 


(( 


30. 


July 


11. 


(,i 


14. 


iL 


18. 


a 


25. 


u 


29. 


Aug. 


1. 


u 


8. 


a 


19. 


li. 


09 



John Chapman and Mary Walker. 
William James and Frances Gardner. 
Francis Anderson and Susana Vaughn. 
William Hansford and Sarah Goodman. 
Benjamin Barker and Nancy Franklin. 
William Hoar and Elizabeth Lawton. 
Jeremiah Fones Green and Rebecca Marshal. 
William Weaver, Warwick, and Elizabeth Love- 
land, of Newport. 
John James and Martha Taylor. 
Anthony Murry and Sarah Poole. 

Francis ull and Pennance Cahoone. 

Benjamin Hoxie and Elizabeth Fowler. 
Charles Rickerson and Elizabeth Falmon, of 
Portsmouth, R. I. 
Sept. 8. Samuel Tompkins of Newport and Catharine 

Belcher of Jamestown, R. I. 
12. Thomas Tripp and Pennolopy Wilber. 
26. Michael Logan and Hannah Atkinson. 
Oct. 13. William Willis and Abigail Seavens. 
17. John Cook and Deborah Durphy. 
23. William Brown and Lydia West. 









(( 



a 



244 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 

1771. 

Oct. 30. Thomas Lindsey of Providence and Rebecca 

Allen of Portsmouth. 
*' 31. William Peckham and Bathiah Peckham, Mid- 
dletown. 
Nov. 11. Elisha Reynolds and Mary Spencer. 

18. Hezekiah Starbuck of Nantucket and Mary 

Thurston of Newport. 
20. James Dawley, Exeter, and Margaret Langwor- 
thy, Newport. 
Stephen Fish and Joanna Paddock, Portsmouth. 
Arthur Smith and Mary Burroughs. 
Daniel Vernon and Lois Case. 



Benjamin Burdick and Martha Hulling. 

Thomas Crossing and Hannah Clarke. 

John Cory and Mary Petyface. 

Philip Purges and Mary Clarke. 

Josiah Hazard, Jamestown, and Mary Carr, New- 
port. 

William Anthony and Alice Coggeshall. 

Thomas Hews and Mary Irish. 

William Smith and Hannah Carr. 

Richard Swan and Johannis Davis. 

Andrew Willie, Newport, and Mary Chappell, 
South Kingstown. 

Hugh Harris and Rebecca Holt. 

Nicholas Browning, Newport, and Lydia Clarke, 
Portsmouth. 

William Lyon and Hannah Langworthy. 

Benjamin Dexter, East Greenwich, and Elizabeth 
Pearce, Portsmouth. 

William Cory and Darkis West. 

Gregory Swaster and Mary Mott. 

Job Lawton and Patience Hall, Portsmouth. 

David Barker, Middletown, and Eunice Sherman, 
Portsmouth. 



Dec. 


5. 


a 


5. 


11 


15. 


1772. 




Jan. 


23. 


Feb. 


20. 


Mch. 


29. 


April 11. 


May 


31. 


July 


17. 


Aug. 


5. 


(( 


13. 


a 


22. 


(( 


26. 


Sept. 


8. 


(( 


14. 


a 


20. 


n 


23. 


a 


24. 


n 


27. 


Oct. 


1. 



Li 



1772. 




Oct. 


11. 


i(. 


18. 


14 


20. 


a 


25. 


Nov. 


8. 


LI, 


24. 


Nov. 


29. 


^i 


29. 


Dec. 


"X« 


(,i 


6. 


u 


7. 


ii, 


11. 


(.1. 


11. 


(.i 


1.^ 


<.i 


21. 


u 


31. 


1773. 




Jan. 


7. 


Feb. 


2. 


Feb. 


29. 


Mch. 


8. 


i( 


21. 


a 


25. 


April 


23. 


it 


25. 


May 


6. 


May 


16. 


June 


3. 


a 


17. 


a 


25. 


u 


27. 


a 


30. 


July 


1. 


44 


1. 


44 


19. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 245 

Stephen Lambert and Elizabeth James. 
Peleg Remington and Amey Jones. 
Webster James and Mary Dawson. 
Peleg Peckham and Elizabeth Smith, Middletown. 
James Sanford and Priscilla Lowdon. 
John Northup, North Kingston, and Margery Sal- 
ford, Newport. 
John McKenzie and Katharine Cleveland. 
Oliver Dewick and Penelopy Hardy. 
John Richards and Sarah Childs. 
Lewis Bulliod and Sarah Ryan. 
Joseph Cahoone and Elizabeth Almy. 
Caleb Foster and Ann Briggs. 
Seth Chapin and Hannah Hamblin. 
Ebenezer Campbell and Mary Cahoone. 
Daniel Vaughn and Elizabeth Potter. 
John Remmington and Sarah Hopkins. 

John Clarke and Mary Ashley. 
John Taber and Penelope Howland. 
James Winstanley and Lydia Eldredge. 
John Tennant and Elizabeth Peterson. 
Constant Tabor and Francis Gardner. 
William Weaver and Nelly Gibbs. 
William Cornell and Mary Mumford. 
Samuel Spooner and Lucy Lowcar. 
Stafford Russell and Caroline Russell. 
John Wanton and Lydia Gilbert. 
Jonah Bill and Hannah Tennant. 
James Martin and Patience Slocum. 
Henry Dayton and Mary Coggeshall. 
Donl}^ Vial and Sarah Hill. 
John Read and Mary Dunham. 
Benjamin Church and Elizabeth Barney. 
Philip Dunham and Mary Child. 
Peter Langley and Elizabeth Lowdon. 



246 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 



July 


21 


u 


25. 


a 


25. 


Aug. 


5. 


i(. 


12. 


ti 


12. 


i(. 


29. 


Sept. 


12. 


a 


12. 


u 


19. 


(( 


30. 


Oct. 


16. 


a 


28. 


u 


31. 


Nov. 


20. 


a 


26. 


Dec. 


2. 



Dec. 



a 


9. 


a 


9. 


a 


13. 


(.i 


20. 


1774. 




Feb. 


18. 


Mar. 


10. 


Apr. 


29. 


May 


8. 


(( 


25. 


a 


26. 


a 


29. 


(( 


29. 


June 


1. 



. Robert Sanford and Elizabeth Pliillips. 

Francis Marvil and Margaret Bill. 

John Buckley and Sarah Dayton. 

Thomas Wade and Sarah Forbes. 

Peirce Spear and Dorcas Snell. 

James Durfee and Dinah Spencer. 

Lillibridge Worth and Mary Barker. 

Daniel Safford and Ann Vaughn. 

John Burroughs and Sarah Johnson. 

Daniel Munks and Elizabeth Simpson. 

Daniel Vaughan, Newport, and Hannah Gorton, 
Warwick. 

Elisha Clarke and Elizabeth Brown. 

Christopher Durfee, Portsmouth, and Mary Fisher. 

James Carr, Jamestown, and Desire Tew. 

Thomas Burnham and Ann Dyre. 

John Hicks and Elizabeth Flookey. 

Jonathan Albro, Portsmouth, and Elizabeth 
Taber, Little Compton. 

Nathaniel Jenkins, Newport, and Elizabeth Man- 
chester, Middle town, 

Robert Dunbar and Eunice Barker. 

Samuel Clarke and Ruth Peckham, Middletown. 

George Manuel and Mary Carr. 

Henry Northup and Mary Gardner. 

Jonah Moll and Abigail Church. 

Caleb Allen and Ann Durphy, Portsmouth. 

Walter Clarke, Middletown, and Lydia Luther, 

Newport. 
William Appleby and Jane Britson. 
Rappe Batchellar and Sarah Parsons. 
Isaac Smith and Elizabeth Stoddard,Middletown. 
Josiah Russell, New Bedford, and Patience Wing. 

Newport. 
John Dockray and Mary Wilkey. 
Joshua Bliven and Desire Burroughs. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 



247 



June 26. 
July 18. 

22. 



i.i 



a 



22. 



(.i 


24. 


l.i 


24. 


Aug. 


25. 


!.<. 


28. 


Sept. 


15. 


ii 


25. 


Oct. 


16. 


(i 


30. 


Nov. 


13. 


Dec. 


6. 


a 


11. 


a 


29. 


1775. 




Jan. 


1. 


Feb. 


1. 


Mar. 


7. 


Apr. 


19. 


May 


1. 


(,(, 


18. 


June 


22. 


July 


7. 



;( 



9. 



Aug. 15. 

'' 17. 
Sept. 6. 

- 7. 
Oct. 15. 



Aaron Sheffield and Mary Nichols. 

Richard Thomas and Ann Elizabeth Decotee. 

Sampson Shearman, Newport, and Waite Greene, 
South Kingston. 

Job Gladding, Dighton, and Mary Claggett, New- 
port. 

Paul Cartwright and Nancy Munro. 
Benjamin Lawton and Abigail Price. 
Robert Cole and Sible Hall. 
John How and Elizabeth Hargil. 
Wing Shepard and Dunerous Slocum. 
Joseph Vickery and Elizabeth Taylor. 
Benjamin Smith and Hannah Woodman. 
John Peters Jorden and Francis Sanford. 
John Brewer and Rebecca Negers. 
Elijah Sanford, Dartmouth, and Sarah Sanford, 

Portsmouth. 
Joseph Perry and Mary Stanton. 
John Ijimbricths and Susanna Thurston. 

Samnel Carr and Sarah Lewis. 

John Scott and Nancy Slocum. 

Samuel Phillips and Sarah Lambert. 

Thomas Gleason and Sarah D unwell. 

John Potter and Susanna Austhi. 

Ebenezer Averett and Sarah Grossman. 

William Dennis and Mary Nichols. 

Benjamin Baker, Newport, and Rlioda Slocum, 

Jamestown. 
Daniel Case, West Greenwich, and Hart Arnold, 

Newport. 
William Moore and Deborah Pender. 
James Center and Mary Howard. 
William Burch and Susannah Almy. 
Edward Dillinoham and Hannah Ambrose. 
Ashton and Hannah Weeden. 



248 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Nov. 16. Jonathan Wilson and Sarah Weeclen, Middle- 
town. 
George Allen and Dorcas Pearce, Providence. 
Isaac Barker and Sarah Peckham, Middletown. 
Jonathan Bennett Ingraham and Mary Sixles. 
Deacon William Tillinghast and Sally Holmes. 

Gideon Cornell and Rebeckah Hunt. 
Sanford Ross and Hannah Briggs. 
Hannah Gladding, Newport, and Susannah Torey, 

Middletown. 
Jonathan Fugurson and Ann Briggs. 
Joseph Burroughs and Deborah Mitchell. 
Joseph Lyon and Mary Underwood. 
William Hacker and Sarah Ash. 
Thomas Devans and Elizabeth Caswell. 
Silas Whitman and Ann Weedon. 
Joseph Freeborn, Newport, and Elizabeth Wood, 

Middletown. 
William Gyles and Mary Caswell. 
Benjamin Holt and Edith Easton. 
Charles Lassells and Prissilla Manchester. 

Samuel Stevens and Ruth Fry. 

Thomas Stevens and Ann Williams. 

Thomas Creapon and Penelope Rhodes. 
Nathaniel Tyley and Mary Nichols. 
Ezekiel Sheffield and Mary Tomlin. 
Josiah Coggeshall, Middletown, and Mary Hors- 

well. 
Thomas Scranton and Rebekah Nickerson. 
Daniel Miller and Hannah Moore. 
Obiah Tripp and Mary Nixon. 
Jonathan Lawton and Sarah Nichols. 
Samuel Wilkey and Elizabeth Hayes. 
Joseph Phillips and Elizabeth Gardner. 
Jeremiah Coleman and Ruth Gilbert. 
William Burt and Mehitable Fowler. 



t( 


23. 


Dec. 


2. 


• 


21. 


a 


25- 


1776. 




Jan. 


11. 


Feb. 


27. 


Mch. 


7. 


Apr. 


18. 


May 


30. 


June 


9. 


u 


16. 


a 


30. 


a 


30. 


July 


12. 

1 


(( 


15. 


a 


22. 


a 


30. 


Aug. 


2. 


a 


15. 


u 


26. 


Aug. 


29. 


Sept. 


19. 


Oct. 


10. 


(( 


17. 


Nov. 


4. 


(( 


6. 


a 


9. 


li 


9. 


(( 


14. 


a 


17. 


(( ■ 


18. 



Nov. 


2i 


1777. 




Jan. 


5. 


i(. 


16. 


a 


12. 


' ct 


29. 


Feb. 


6. 


April 


5. 


(.<. 


12. 


ii 


24. 


June 


1. 


July 


9. 


Aug. 


25. 


Sept. 


13. 


Oct. 


1«. 


Dec. 


4. 


Cl 


27. 


1778. 




Jan. 


1. 


Cb 


17. 


(,<, 


22. 


ii 


25. 


ii 


28. 


il. 


29. 


Feb. 


15. 


Mch. 


17. 


Mar. 


17. 


i,i 


26. 


IC 


29. 


Apr. 


16. 


fcC 


16. 


il. 


19. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 249 

. Guy Rogers and Margaret Canol. 

William East and Sarah Macknear. 
John Britton and Lucy Cahoone. 
Henry Prold and Content Crandall, Middletown. 
John Simpson and Mary Harrison, "both belong- 
ing to the Royal Regiment of Artillery." 
James Ingraham and Rebekah Johnson. 
Wm. Freeborn and Mary Brownell, Portsmouth. 
John Goddard and Mary Howard. 
Cook Wilcox and Sarah Eslick, Portsmouth. 
Peleg Thurston and Phebe Lawton, Portsmouth. 
Joshua Sisson and Elizabeth Strange, Portsmouth. 
Nathan Hammett and Catherine Yates. 
Edward Simmons and Amey Ferrent. 
Jeremiah Stacy' and Ann Stanton. 
Jabez Sisson and Ann Sanford, Portsmouth. 
James Moody and Polly Fairbanks. 

Gideon Durpliy and Susannah Freeborn, Ports- 
mouth. 

John Easton and Mary Easton. 

William Douglas and Svirah Sweet. 

George Stevens and Mary Veogy. 

Benjamin Cornell and Martha Wilbour. 

Giles Lawton and Ann Perry, Middletown. 

Joseph Cozzens and Mary Johnson, 

William Batty and Rebecca Tears, Jamestown. 

Thomas Dugan and Ruth Dayton. 

Jethro Jackson and Lillica Robertson. 

William Stevenson and Jane Holt. 

Francis Wliite and Catharine McDonald. 

Newport Townsend and Philis Whitehorn. 

Clarke Fowler, Jamestown, and Anstres Ingraham 
Newport. 

(To be continued.) y-^ . ^ , ^. ^H 1L 



Book Notes. 



♦ 



[Publishers and authors wishing a notice in this department should send 
copies of their publications to R. H. Tilley, Newport, R. I.] 



Year Book of the Societies composed of Descend- 
ants OF THE Men of the Revolution — By Henry Hall. 
New York: 1890. — This volume is a large octavo, set in 
handsome old-style type, bound with cloth covers and uncut, 
380 pages. 

It describes in detail the history of each one of the twenty 
or more State Societies and the National Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution, California being given with 
great fulness ; of the four local Societies and General Society 
of Sons of the Revolution ; of the New Hampshire Sons of 
the Revolution ; the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
and The Society of the Cincinnati. 

In every case where it has been possible to obtain them 
(and that means in the case of all, except two or three oF 
the Societies), the full roll of Membership of the S. A. R. 
and S. R. is given with a memorandum of the names, rank, 
services, etc., of each member's revolutionary ancestor or an- 
cestors from whom eligibility has been acquired. The roll of 
membership of the Cincinnati is also given. 

All of the respective Constitutions are given in full. 

There are also included in the work a long list of dates of 
conspicuous events in the seven years' war, and a Calendar 
for each one of the years of the Revolution. 

This book is a magnificent compilation, upon which great 
care, labor and expense have been lavished, the object of tliQ 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 251 

author being to make it an accurate book of reference for all 
who are interested in the great movement for the organiza- 
tion of the descendants of Revolutionary sires, which is 
spreading all over the iJnited States. 

Price, 2.00 per copy. The book will be sent by express at 
the cost of the purchaser, or will be delivered in New York 
City by messenger. Orders and remittances may be ad- 
dressed to The Republic Press (The New York Printing 
Company), 536-538 Pearl St., New York City. 

History and Genealogy of the Burgner Family in 
America. — Mr. Jacob Burgner, of Oberlin, Ohio, has recent- 
ly issued the "Burgner Family in America." It contains 
about two hundred pages, is illustrated by portraits and 
family trees, and is substantially bound in half roan. Mr. 
Wm. B. Chamberlain, of Oberlin College, thus speaks of it: 

"Among the special histories, prepared from original 
sources, not the least interesting and valuable are the Chroni- 
cles of families that have formed a part of our pioneer life in 
America. One such family history it has been my privilege 
to see and in part to examine. It is a record of the Bui-gner 
family, of Swiss descent, settling in Eastern Pennsylvania 
and. from thence diverging in many directions, especially 
into northern Ohio. The pictures of pioneer life are graphic 
and interesting, true to the life, as we know from many othor 
sources, yet always given with the air of reality and almost 
of personal participation, which marks the trul}^ original 
production. The author, Mr. Jacob Burgner, of Oberlin, lias 
spared neither time nor effort in collecting, sifting, arranging 
and retouching the details which make up this very interest- 
ing story. Such s[)ecial histories have a value beyond their 
interest to the members of the family. Including, as they 
do, many minute particulars, which a general history caimot 
give, they preserve the very life and experience of the days 
they recount, enabling the reader to realize for himself what 
has been endured by the fathers in founding homes for the 
present and future generations; and thus keep alive the true 



252 INIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

.vpiiit of patriotism and loyalty to all that makes the Ameri- 
can, Clu'istian home. 

Anotlier advantage is the presentation, in accessible form, 
of anthenticated facts wliich may s^rve as material, or at 
least as corroboration, for larger works and those of more in- 
terest to the general reader. Thus they help to maintain 
the true historic spirit. Full indexes and an ingeniously 
elaborated "family tree" add greatly to the value of this 
readable family history." 

The book will be sent by mail, postpaid, for ^3.00. 

History of Salisbury, N. H. — One of the most valuable 
and interesting of New Hampshire town histories is that of 
the town of Salisbury, which has just been published and is 
now ready for distribution. It is a volume of 888 pages, 
printed in clear type on heavy paper and bears the Imprint 
of William E. Mooi'e, Manchester. The material for the 
work, which covers a period from the time of the settlement 
of the town to the date of publication, 1890, was collated by 
Dr. John J. Dearborn of Salisbury and edited by the late 
James O. Adams of Boscawen and Hon. H. P. Rolfe of Con- 
cord. The volume, which is profusely illustrated with cuts, 
maps and portraits of distinguished citizens, is very hand- 
somely bound in dark cloth with gilt lettering. The price of 
the history is iB4.00. 

The Grave of Myles Standish. — The evidence con- 
cerning the grave of Myles Standish and his family is now 
ready for publication. There is also evidence about the 
burial place of John Alden and his wife. Elder Brewster and 
all the early settlers of Duxbury, Mass. There is a vast 
amount of new and most valuable information in the mate- 
rial arranged. The evidence will be illustrated so far as is 
necessary. Before submitting the matter to the printer the 
publishers wish to have guaranteed at least 300 copies at $1 
each. All who wish to have the evidence published, will 
please send a postal card to Box 97, Duxbury, Mass. When 
the requisite number of subscribers is secured, the manu- 
script will be printed at once. ' 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 253 

The Sabbath in Puritan New England, by Alice 
Morse Earle. — "The author has brought before us the every- 
day life of the New England Puritans in a manner that im- 
presses one at once as vivid and truthful. One seems to see 
the rough, bare 'meeting-house' of the earlier days, high on 
some bleak hill, unshaded by trees and wearing more the ap- 
pearance of a fortress than of a house of worship. All the 
relaxations which made bearable the long service are duly 
set foi'th — the fennel and carraway seed that seem to have 
been the Puritan substitutes for marshmallows and chocolate 
creams, and the quainter custom as well which permitted 
members of the congregation to stretch their limbs, say, at 
the 'nineteenthly. of the sermon, by rising from their seats 
and leaning against their pew doors — in some cases with dis- 
astrous results. Women were ordered to remove their bon- 
nets in meeting, which strikes one as a little singular, con- 
sidering the Puritan's reverence for the letter of the Scrip- 
ture and St. Paul's directions upon that subject. Chapters 
on 'Seating the Meeting,' 'The Tithingman and the Sleep- 
ers,' 'The Icy Temperature of tlie Meeting- House,' gives 
us still further details of the circumstances of Puritan wor- 
ship. 

We of this degenerate age, who have a complacent sense 
of duty performed if we attend service once, or twice at the 
most, on Sundays, botli services not taking more tlian tln-ee 
hours out of the twenty-four, can but wonder how the fami- 
lies of Puritan ministers endured a long family service on 
Sunday morning, followed b}" tlie well-nigh interminable pub- 
lic services of the morning and afternoon ; then a private 
repetition of the afternoon's discourse, with other services, 
and a Psalm after supper ! Verily, there was no lack of ma- 
terial for 'edification !' 

The authority of the Puritan minister seems to have been 
all but boundless in the earlier days, and the punishments 
which were inflicted for merely verbal criticism on tlie part 
of his parisliioners, to say nothing of interruptions during 
the service, empliasize the respect which was felt to be his 



254 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

(Inc. The congregation stood as he entered, thus following 
tlie custom wliich now prevails in the 'High' Episcopal 
churclies, tliough probably inspired by a different motive. 
Sino-ularly enough, this far-reaching authority did not in- 
clude the right to {)erform the marriage service ; and to this 
day (the writer believes) a minister can only perform that 
service by virtue of his authority as a magistrate, which is 
given him for that act only. 

Some of the older observances still linger. Even in Bos- 
ton a "meeting-house" or two may be found where the con- 
gregation stands during one prayer, at least, and to go out- 
side that building, the ordinance against smoking in the 
street was not formally repealed until a* few years ago. 
There are several chapters too, which treat of the different 
Psalm books of tlie time, and the really terrible ''Church 
Music" of that day is set forth in such a manner as almost to 
reconcile one to the modern fashionable choir. 

That our Puritan ancestors possessed a highly ingenious 
orthography and a fondness for rum is made evident, but 
Miss Earle does abundant justice to their nobler qualities ; 
and her sense of the ludicrous never betrays her into irrever- 
ence. That their life was stern and narrow in its outward 
circumstances has long been known ; but the sympathetic in- 
sight shown in 'The Sabbath in Puritan New England' re- 
veals something of the brighter side of Puritan society as 
well ; the sober but heart-felt cheer that must exist in all 
heroic lives." — Boston Commonwealth. 

Vital Rrcord of Rhode Island, Providence County. 

— Mr. James N. Arnold, of Providence, has the manuscript • 
for the second and third volumes of his records nearly ready 
for the printer. Volume II will comprise the city of Provi- 
dence and the towns of Cranston, Johnston and North Provi- 
dence. Volume III will contain the records of Burrillville, 
Glocester, Scituate, Foster, Smithfield and Cumberland. 

The two volumes will give a full record of Births, Marriages, 
and Deaths of Providence county. The price of each vol- 
ume will be five dollars. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 255 

, f^ecent Publicaticrps. 

Annals of the Redwood Library, Newport, R. I. — 
Mr. George C. Mason has completed his work on this book, 

and has produced a valuable history of one of the oldest in- 
stitutions of its kind in America. It contains many illustra- 
tions and portraits. Published by the Evans Printing House, 
Philadelphia. 

Eastern Worcester; its First Settlers and their 
Locations. Historical and Genealogical. By Caleb A. 
Wall, Worcester. 1891. pp. 52. 50 cents. 

Soldiers in King Philip's War, containing list of the 
soldiers of Massachusetts colony, who served in the Indian 
war of 1675-1677, with sketches of the principal officers, and 
copies of ancient Documents and Records relating to the 
War. By George M. Bodge. Boston. 1891. pp. XXIV-370. 
Edition limited. Cloth. rBo.OO. Send orders to the author, 
185 Lexington St., East Boston, Mass. 

Some Phases of the Sexual Morality and Church 
Discipline in Colonial New England. By Cliarles 
Francis Adams. Cambridge. 1891. Paper, pp. 48. 

The One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Founding of St. James Parish, Birmingham (in the town 
of Derby) Connecticut, and the unveiling of a memorial 
tablet to the Rev. Richard Mansfield, D. D., Rector of the 
Parish for seventy-two consecutive years, 1748-1820. Paper. 
pp. 37. 

Notes and Additions to the History of Gloucester, 
Mass.. Second series. By John J. Babson. Salem : 1891. 
pp. 178. fl.50 

The Ladd Family. A Genealogical and Biographical 
memoir of the Descendants of Daniel Ladd, of Haverliill, 
Mass., Josepli Ladd, Portsmoutli, R. L, Jolin La(hl of Bur- 
lington, Vt., and Jolui Ladd of Cliarles City Co., Va., com- 
piled by Warren Ladd, 1890, cloth, pp. 414. 



250 magazine of new england htstory. 

An Account of the Centennial Celebration of the 
First Congregational Church of Christ in Hinesburg, 
Vermont. Buiiingtoii, 1890, pp. 78. 

The Goodwins of Hartford, Connecticut, Descend- 
ants OF William and Ozias Goodwin, compiled by James 
Junius Goodwill, Hartford: 1891, cloth, pp. 798. 

Illustrated Popular Biography op Connecticut, 
compiled and published by J. A. Spalding, Hartford: 1891, 
cloth, pp. 375. 

. An Autobiographical Sketch of Rev. Royal Crafts 
S PAULDING, and extracts from letters of himself and his 
wife, edited by Francis Barnes, Houlton, Maine, 1891, pp. 
53. , 

Salem Witchcraft in Outline, by Caroline E. Upham, 
Salem: 1891, pp. 161. ^ 

Gknealogical Records of the Descendants of John 
AND Anthony Emery of Newbury, Mass., 1590 — 1890. 
compiled by Rev. Rufus Emery, Salem: 1890, pp. XII-610. 

The Sayward Family ; being the History and Genealogy 
of Henry Sayward of York, Maine, and his Descendants. 
With a brief account of other Saj^wards who settled in 
America. By Charles A. Sayward. Ipswich, Mass. ; Inde- 
pendent Press, E. G. Hull. 1890. 

A Genealogy of One Branch of the Warren Fami- 
ly, with its intermarriages, 1637-1890. Compiled for Moses 
Conant Warren, by Mary Parker Warren. Edited by Emily 
Wilder Leavitt. Printed for Private Circulation. 1890. 

Genealogy of the Bigelow Family of America, from 
the Marriage in 1642 of John Biglo and Mary Warren to the 
Year 1890. By Gilman Bigelow Howe. Worcester, Mass. 
Printed by Charles Hamilton. 8vo. pp. 517. 1890 



Index to Names in Volume 1. 



Abbott, 73 87. 

Adams, 7, 74 75 99 102 
104 105 123 229 
238 239 240 252 
255, 

Adgate, 214. 

Adlam 169. 

Ady, 57. 

Akley, 150. 

Albro, 55 246. 

Alden, 252. 

Aldridge, 126. 

Alexander, 96. 

Allen, 44 74 75 96 102 
124 125 136 139 
141 142 152 189 
213 214 215 224 
344 246 249. 

Allin, 51. 

Ailing, 117. 

AUyD, 238. 

Allis, 85. 

Allison, 124 128 151. 

AUyn, 76. 

Almy, 245 247. 

Anabrose, 247. 

Ames, 80 213. 

Amory, J2 

Anderson 45 48 49 52 
128 243. 

Andrews, 56 58. 

Angier, 110. 

Anthony, 53 60 63 124 
151 244. 

Apis, 102 105. 

Appieby, 246. 

Appleton, 33. 

Apply, 214. 

Arnold, 54 80 132 190 
191 217 218 219 
247. 

Arber, 157, 158. 

Askey, 150. 

Ash, 249. 

Ashbo, 215. 

Ashley, 84 245. 

Ash ton, 247. 

Atchinson, 43 45. 

Alkinsor, 16 19 127 181 
243. 



Atwell, 45 46 47 49 214 

2.5. 
Atwood, 125. 
Austin, 52 64 102 117 

214 225 247. 
Averett, 247. 
Avery, 43 45 46 47 48 

91 96 187 214 215. 
Babcock, 3S 102 104 105 

12S 144. 
Babson, 255. 
Bachelder. 111. 
Backus, 112 172. 
Badcock, 82 99. 
Bailey, 144 216. 
Balch, 5. 
Baldwin, 48 79. 
Bannister, 100. 
Batiks, 226. 
Berber, 83. 
Barbage, 115. 
Barker, 7 42 46 52 53 

55 110 118 125 15 ; 

151 152 186 189 

213 214 215 243 

244 246 247 248 
Birnard, 33 34 84. 
Barnes, 86 256. 
Barns, 54. 
Barney, 153 245. 
Barrin^ton, 99 100. 
Barrou, 127. 
Barrows, 81. 
Bartlett, 7, 103. 
Barton, 99 100 102 103 

104 105 107 108. 
Bassell, 151. 
Bassett. 51 128. 
Bates, 63 228 2.30 231. 
Bateman, 1.50. 
Batchellar, 246. 
Battey, 53. 
Batty, 126 151 249. 
Baxter, 125 128. 
Bayley, 127, 152. 
Bazell, 53. 
Bean, 7. 
Beard, 126. 
Beauchamp, 227. 
Beebe, 124 214. 



Beeby, 128. 

Belcher, 57 114 127 152 

243. 
Belding, 85. 
Belknap, 242. 
Bell, 128 152. 
Bellingham, 166. 
Benackland, 151. 
Bemont, 146. 
Bennett, 55 127 128. 
Bentley, 29 31 54. 
Biard, 1 2. 
Biglev, 153. 
Biglo, 2.56. 
Bill, 54 215 245 246. 
Bi)iings,7 53126 128 214. 
Bird, 91. 

Birdsall, 117 148. 
Biscoe, 86. 
Bishop, 189. 
Bissell, 79.- 
Blakely, 183. 
Blancbard, 181. 
Blasiu, 125. 
Bliss, 47. 
B liven, 126, 246. 
Blodget, 116. 
Bradbury, 7. 
Bradison, 52. 
Bradley, 141 145. 
Bradford, 47 48 93 150 

188 213 214 215. 
Brad street, 83. 
Braman, 151. 
Brandish, 193 195. 
Brandon, 205. 
Brasier, 184. 
Brattle, 235. 
Bray ton, 54 125 131 141 

142. 
Breed, 79. 

Brewer, 74 78 90 247. 
Brewster, 118. 
Briant, 150. 
Bridge, 90 127. 
Bridges, 53. 

Briggs, 36 102 105 107 
128 150 152 245 248. 
Brigham, 10 11. 
Bright, 28. 



Index to Names in Volume 1. 



Brinley, 170 171. 
IJritton, 240. 
Brooks, 12 54 201. 
BrowD, 7 42 49 54 89 

102 105 127 144 150 

151 152 214 221243 

240. 
Browniue:, 244. 
Browuell, 249. 
Bruce, 75. 
Bruff, 105153. 
Board man, 109, 
Bodge, 225. 
Bolles, 214. 
Boltwood, 86. 
Bond, 68 86. 
Bonnis, 152. 
Booth, 14. 
Borden, 128. 
Boss, 143. 
Bosworth, 116. 
Bourne, 8 9. 
Bow, 116. 
Bowditch, 224. 
Bo wen, 75 83 117 165. 
Bower, 152. 
Bowman, 114. 
Boyes, 119. 
Boyd, 4 5. 
Boyd en, 110. 
Boylston, 239, 
Budgie, 4. 
Buckley, 246. 
Buel, 15. 
Bugrbee, 89. 
Bulliod, 245. 
Bullock, 138 139. 
Burr, 192. 
Burch, 126 152 247. 
Burden, 52. 
Burdett, 30. 
Bardick, 175 198 244. 
Burg, 199. 
Burgs, 80 81 199. 
Burges, 199 244. 
Burgner, 251. 
Burke, 67 187. 
Burnes, 152, 
Burnham, 246. 
Burrell, 153. 
Burroughs, 124 126 153 

244 246 248. 
Burt, 77 125 248. 
Bush, 124. 
Bussell, 3. 
Button, 213. 
Cadwell, 163. 
Cahoone, 53 152 243 245 

249. 
Calef , 79. 



Callendpr, 169. 

Camp, 49. 

Campbell, 42 53 96 153 

245. 
Canol, 249. 
Carr, 7 52 54 124 150 152 

244 246 247. 
Carroll, 151. 
Card, 54 55 125 150. 
Carpenter, 52 125 139 

152 216. 
Carter, 55 153, 
Cartin, 150. 
Cartwright, 119 126 208 

210 211 224 247. 
Gary, 147 151. 
Case, 244 247. 
Casey, 129 144. 
Castle, 120. 

Caswell, 51 53 54 168 248 
Center, 247. 
Chace 127. 

Chadwick,'52 54 126153. 
Cnatubers, 153. 
Chamberlain, 251. 
Champlin, 152. 
Chandler, 126. 
Channing, 150. 
Chapel, 213 214 215. 
Chappel, 214. 
Chappell, 44 186 244. 
Chappali^r, 138. 
Chapin, 77 215. 
Chapiin, 82. 
Chapman, 49 52 114 127 

150 214 215 243. 
Chase, 52 54118 119 141. 
Cheeseborough, 232 2.34 
Chester. 76 84 119 186 

187 188 189 215. 
Cheiney, 82 91. 
Chickering, 70. 
Child, 71 86 153 245. 
Chipman, 115. 
Christy. 44. 
Choate, 88 114. 
Church, 3 49 124 214 

245 246. 

Clark, 74 75 127 139 140 
168 183. 

Clarke, 51 52 54 55 113 
124 125 127 150151 
152 153 173 175 197 
206 207 220 225 244 
245 246. 

Claggett, 51 247. 

Clap, 91. 

Clapp, 226. 

Cleveland, 245. 

Clinton, 99. 



Cobb, 214. 
Cobham, 209. 
Cock, 117. 
Cocke, 172. 
Coddmgton, 228 229 230 

231 233 2341235 236 

237 238. 
Coe, 224. 
Coffee, 165. 
Coffin, 63 210. 
Coggeshall, 55 100 124 

127 128 138 143 153 

244 245 248. 
Cole 247. 

ColemaD,*35 181 185 248. 
Collier, 41. 
Collins, 165. 
Collit, 49. 
Colverd, 52. 
Comer, 172. 
Comstock, 43 44 45 46 47 

48 49 187 188 214 

215 240. 
Con;klin, 179. 
Congdon, 52 54. 
Converse, 24. 
Cook, 83 115 128 186 187 

188 189 206 213 215 

227 243. 
Cooledge, 86. 
Cooper, 55 70 153 172 

175 177. 
Copp, 49 96. 
Coombs, 7. 
Coqutgion, 215. 
Cory, 102 104 105 115 125 

129 151 161 244. 
Cornell, 124 129 151^^245 

248 249. 
Cottrell, 151. 
Cotton, 76 83 159 226. 
Cowell, 105. 
Cox, 115 127. 
Cozzens, 53 150 153 249. 
Crafts, 88. 
Cramner, 209 211. 
Crandall,59 102 105 115 

116150 173 248. 
Crank, 102 105. 
Cranston, 52 125 150. 
Crapon, 125. 
Crary, 105. 

Creapon, 52 128 151 248. 
Cressiy, 37. 
Crocker, 215. 
Cromwell, 31. 
Cross, 80. 
Crosby, 3 7 127. 
Crossing, 244. 
Crossman, 247. » 



Index to Names in Volume 1. 



Crow, 80 83 85. 
Cromb, 102 105. 
Culver, 118 151. 
Curtis, 52 76 91. 
CurwJD. 32. 
Cutts, 18 41. 
Cutter, 68 73. 
Damon, 75. 
Danforlh, 87 89. 
Daniel, 18. 
Dannel, 113. 
Davenson, 114. 
Davis, 59 90 115 116 119 

127 139 215 244. 
Dawley, 244. 
Dawson, 13 245. 
Dayton, 53 245 246 249. 
Dean, 116. 
Dearborn, 252. 
Decotee, 247. 
Delano, 5 87. 
Delany, 15. 
Delimer, 215. 
Demiup, 90. 
Dennis, 53 101 102 127 

247. 
Denison,*43 45 46 48 49 

75 79 84 96 118 

216. 
Dennett, 1 3. 
Dent, 15. 
DelShon, 215. 
Devens, 248. 
Devenport, 53, 125. 
Devotion. 90. 
Dewick, 245. 
Dexter, 123 132 146 244 
Dickens, 152. 
Dickins, 150. 
Dickinson, 124 131. 
Dillingham, 247. 
Diman, 99 103 105. 
Diskell, 214. 
Dixon, 42 44 45 46 48 49 
Decotay, 53. 
Dockray, 246. 
Dodery, 152. 
Dodge, 43 45 46 47 148. 
Dolbe-ir, 187 215. 
Dole, 7. 
Donovin, 184. 
Douglass, 142 249. 
Dow, 221. 
Down, 153 
Downer, 127. 
Doyel, 214. 
Dring, 55. 
Drummond, 7. 
Dudley, 90. 
Dugan, 249. 



Dulicina, 124. 
Dummer, 75. 
Dumming, 4. 
Dunbar, 34 35 246. 
DuQcan, 189. 
Dunham, 51 245. 
Dunion, 128, 
Dunton, 127. 
Dunwell. 150 247. 
Durfee, 246. 
Durfy, 151. 
Durphy, 243 246 249. 
Dutton, 6 7 62. 
D wight, 78 87. 
Dyke, 86 128. 
Dyre, 52 55 127 146 

147 246. 
Earle, 111 112 115 128 

152 253 254. 
East, 249. 

Saston, .54 125 127 153 

153 248 249. 
Eaton, 115. 
Echols, 147. 
Eddy, 57 58 114. 
Edmonds, 54. 
Edwards, 20. 
Egerton, 170. 
Eldredge, 52 245. 
Ellery, 167 227. 
Elliot, 105. 
Ellsworth, 80. 
Elton, 226. 
Emerson, 6, 
Emery, 221 2.56. 
Endicott, 28 110. 
English, 44. 
Estabrook, 80. 
Eslick, 249. 
Eustis, 9, 12 62. 
Evins, 118. 
Eyre, 17. 
Eyres, 51. 
Fairbanks, 44 49 127 151 

249. 
Fairchild, 166. 
Fairfax, 2()9. 
Falmon, 24.3. 
Fargo, 43 45 48 213 214. 
Faxon, 76 88. 
Fearing, 65 66. 
Feke, 143 151. 
Fell, 1.53. 
Felt, 34. 
Fellows, 165. 
Ferrent, 249. 
Ferry, 77. 
Fetter, 165. 
Ffovs, 17. 
Field, 115. 



Filley, 14. 

Finley, 127. 

Fish, 244. 

Fisher. 7 74 82 91 102 

150 246. 
Fisk, 30 33 34. 
Fitch, 45 46 47 48 49 93 

213 214 215. 
Flagg, 124 150. 
Flint, 67. 
Francis, 118. 
Franklin, 161 243. 
Freeborne, 53 128 140 

248 249. 
Freeland, 192. 
French, 66 68 78 81 86, 
Friend, 153. 
Frink, 111. 
Frissell, 83. 
Frizzell. 74. 
Frost, 7. 

Fry, 116 126 248. 
Folger, 210. 
Foote, 37. 
Forbes, 4 246. 
Ford. 81. 
Forsyth. 214. 
Foster, 90. 
Fowler, 54 118 126 128 

243 248 249. 
Fox, 45 47 49 50 214 

215 216. 
Fugurson, 24. 
FurglnsoD, 153. 
Fuller, 70 74 85. 
(ralloupe, 110. 
Gallup, 118. 
CTarabliuc, 19. 
Gammell, 168. 
Gardner, 13 51 52 53 54 

55 87 90 125 126 

127 151 243 245 246 

248. 
Garfield, 88, 
Gates, 213. 
Gay, 127. 
Gears, 150. 
Geer, 126. 
Gereardy, 139. 
Georere, 55 102 105. 
Gev, 53. 
Gibbs, 119 126 151 155 

245 
Giddings," 7 110. 
Gifford, 224. 
Gilbert, 64 96 215 245 248 
Gillis, 52. 
Gilman, 6 19 113. 
Giles, 163. 
Graffort, 16 18. 



Index to Names in Volume I. 



i 



Grant, 14 15 53 78 142 

150. 
Grangei', 108. 
GraveH, 85. 
Gray, 204. 
Grazell. 48. 
Greeu, 52 55 127 128 141 

148 152 101 243. 
Greene, 130 131 151 199 

219 247. 
Greenburg, 125. 
(xfeeura tn, 53 J25. 
Grenale, 102 105. 
Griftou, 153. 
Griggs. 91. 
Griunall, 151. 
Grinnall, 52 54. 
Gritjwold, 94. 
Grosvenor, 144 
Gjad, 82. 
Godard, 82. 
Goddard, 125 126 249. 
Godfrey, 55 170. 
Goff, 101. 
Golden, 128. 
Gorham, 84. 
Gore, 90. 

G.)rtoLi,49 59 141 142 246. 
Goodale, 144. 
Goodman, 53 243. 
Goodwin, 3 221 226 256. 
G^uld. 77. 
Gladding, 247 248. 
Gleasoii, 247. 
Gyles, 129 248. 
Gubbins, 125 128. 
Guild, 21 91 102. 
Gunners, 153. 
Hacker, 248. 
Haile, 168. 
HaiU, 164. 
Haines, 102. 
Hall, 44 73 77 89 127 128 

153 244 247 250. 
Hallack, 49. 
Hal comb, 225. 
Hiley, 117. 
Halloway, 148. 
Halyorson, 128. 
Ham, 7. 
Hamblin, 245. 
Hamelton, 189. 
Hamraett, 55 249. 
Hammond, 6 7 68 78 81 

189. 
Hancock, 11 123 229 230 

231 236 237. 
Hansford, 243. 
Hardin, 12.5. 
Harding, 38. 



Hardy, 150 245. 

Hargill, 247. 

Hare, 102 152. 

Ha- low, 4. 

hlarris. 10 49 53 112 124 

244. 
Harrington , 72. 
Harrison, 249. 
Hart, 151. 
Harvard, 22 109. 
aassett, 102 lu4 216. 
Hasey, 4, 222. 
Haskius, 9. 
Hassam, 13. 
Hastings, 87. 
Hatch, 7. 
Hathaway, 127. 
Hathorn, 4. 
Havens, 134. 
Havett, 104 216. 
Hay ward, 152. 
Hawkins, 144. 
Hawley, 78 87. 
Hayes, 7 248. 
Hayues, 7. 

Hazard, 54 124 150 244. 
Hazel, 177 178. 
Hearn, 113. 
Healey, 83. 
Heeth, 126. 
Helme, 84 125 217. 
Herbert, 5. 
Herrington, 53. 
Herrick, 182 189. 
Hews, 37 244. 
Hewitt, 78 216. 
Hicks, 52 128 246. 
Hichbone, 4. 
Higley, 63. 
Higginson, 28 29 31 32 

34. 
Hill, 7 52 54 61 62 109 

126 131 134 148 151 

189 215 231 245. 
Hillhouse, 42 45 46 48 92 

93 94 95 96 186 187 

188 
Him an, 3*8 184. 
Hinsdale, 77 78. 
Hiscox, 173 201. 
Howard, 247. 
Hix, 153. 
Hoag, 221. 
Hoar, 54 243. 
Hobart. 77. 
Hobbell, 116. 
Hoeg, 221. 
Hoegg, 221. 
Hoi brook. 82. 
Holden, 151. 



Holding, 53. 

Holgrave, 69. 

Holiman, 169. 

Holister. 215. 

Holland, 4. 

HoUey, 151. 

Holmes, 12 49 173 178 

179 198 201 213 222 

24S 
Holt, 128 189 244 248 249. 
Hookey, 124 126 246. 
Hopkins, 40 126 134 145 

151 153 245. 
Hopper, 165 166. 
Hopkins, 40. 
Huskins, 86. 
Horswell, 248. 
Hosmer, 79 94. 
Horlon, 43, 44 46 47. 
Houghton, 214 215. 
Hovey, 51. 
Howard, 3 153 
Howe, 102 247 
Howell, 90 128 
Howland, 52 124 148 

151 245. 
Hoxie, 243. 
Hoxsey, 125. 
Hurl but, 226. 
Husband, 127. 
Hutchins, 166. 
Hutchinson. 153, 231. 
Hubbard, 172 173 174 
176 
196 
200 



249. 
256. 
213. 
124 



177 
197 
201 



193 

198 

203. 



175 

195 

199 

Huckins, 81. 
Hudson, 51 128 150 152 

165. 
Hull, 54 62 77. 
Ruling, 53 172 193. 
Hulling, 244. 
Hunt, 70 79 83 102 105 

126 150 221 248. 
Humphrey, 126 127. 
Hunter, 171. 
Huntington, 14 54. 
Hutchinson, 8 193. 
Huse 52 
Hyde' 68' 70 81 84 85 86 

216. 
Ingraham, 125 152 217 

248 249 
frish, 1,52 244. 
Irving', 44. 
Israel, 37. 
Jackson. 70 72 77 82 86 

126 150 151 153 

176 177 249. 
Jackways, 128. 



Index to Names in Volume 1. 



JafErey, 181. 
James, 126 152 243 245. 
Jamesou, 168. 
Jeffries, 52. 
Jencks, 147. 
Jenkins, 221 246. 
Jerauld, 141 142. 
Jewett, 96 186 187 1^8 

213. 
Johnsoo, 24 44 48 49 89 

114 117 128 153 

2ua 246 249. 
Jones, 21 86 114 115 

117 184 245. 
Jorden, 247. 
Josselyn, 18. 
JauiD, 6. 
Joy, 53. 
Kai^u, 151. 
Keayne, 231. 
Keeiiey, 54 
Keith, 167 227. 
Kelky, 15 127. 
Kelsey, 126 
Kendall, 36 126. 
Kenrick, 91. 
Kennedy, 15 150. 
Kilburu, 124. 
Kilton, 146. 
Kimbal , 7. 
Kin?, 33 54 118 152. 
Kmgsley, 116, 117. 
Kinsley, 119. 
Kinyou, 125, 128. 
Knapp, 195. 
K )huD, U). 
Ladd, 63 224 2.55. 
LaFayetto, 9 lU 11 12. 
Lake, 76, 152. 
Lamb, 64 116 166 167. 
LamOeri, 245 247. 
Lane, 113 114 116. 
Ldno^don, 112. 
Lanjjley, 51 127 151 245. 
Lau^worthv, 52 126 153 

175 244. 
Lings:ati', 241. 
Lapish, 7. 
Larcom, 110. 
Larkins, 12-5. 
Lassells, 124 248. 
Latham, 146. 
Lathrop, 14 49 
Litiraoiv, 213 214. 
Law, 171. 
Lawrania, 127. 
Lawrence, 227. 
Lawton, .52 125 126 128 

1^-0 151 152 225 i 

243 244 247 248 249 1 



Lay, 84 128. 

Layhu, 126 

Leapins, 151. 

Leatheain, 126. 

Leavitt, 256. 

Lee, 99 187 190 213. 

Leeds, 38. 

Leete, 174. 

Leot.ard, 5 52 77. 

Lester. 85 213 216. 

Lewake, 150. 

Lewis, 55 80 85 119 152 

247. 
Lickwoud, 164. 
Lilioridcre, 125. 
Liliy, 48 
Linibrietbs. 247. 
Linscom, 143. 
Lincoln. 220. 
Lindsey, 244. 
Line, 54. 
Liuican, 124. 
Little, 54 126 164. 
Loveland, 243. 
Lwermore, 86 181. 
Lion, 54. 
Lloyd, 95. 
LooiniP, 5 213. 
Lf>cke, 125. 
L )2an, 243. 
L jcknr, 89 

Lossi' jr, 10;, 102, 108. 
Lowcar, 245. 
Lowden, 4 7 89. 
Lowdon, 245. 
Lover, 49. 
Lovewell, 242. 
Liirilow, 174, 
Luker, 178. 
Lunt, 220. 

Luther, 54 119 127 246. 
Lyndon, 224. 
Lyon, 51 126 215 244 

248. 
Macnear, 249. 
Maclan, 151. 
Maiirah, 51. 
Malbont', 167 170. 
Mais worth, 42 43 49. 
Manchester, 127 128 246 

248. 
MausfiHld, 162 183 255. 
Manning, .55 187. 
Manuel, 246. 
Manwarrinjj^, 214 215. 
Maples, 44 45 214. 
March, 181. 
Ma-fth, 80, 85 213. 
Marj »ry. 58. 
Marshall, 128 153 24.3. 



Martin, 18 54 152 205 

245. 
Marvil, 246. 
Masun, 46 47 49 75 181 

214 255 
Mather, 76 8.3 93. 
Mathew, 67 132. 
Matthewson, 130 189. 
May, 90. 
Mayhew, 4. 
Maynard, 213 214 215. 
Maxon, 51. 
Maxwell, 143. 
Meacham, 77. 
Meane, 87 
Meckins, 55. 
Meriitt, 19. 
Meserve, 181. 
Messer, 116 127166 221. 
Metcalf, 74 75 91. 
Metlin, 242. 
McClarion, 46. 
McClelland, 50. 
McClellan, 49. 
VlcDjuald, 54 249. 
VlcGiw, 6. 
VIoKenzie, 245. 
McLifl>n, 165. 
McNeil, 214. 
Millard. 54. 
Vliller, 248-. 
Millett, 153.. • 

Milwaid, 51 55 152. 
Miner, 14 
Minor, 42 45 79. 
Mirick, 47 48 49 
Miorrie, 127. 
Mi not, 89. 
Mitchell, 210 248. 
Moffat. 181. 
Moll, 246. 
Mollineua, -54. 
Mollineux, 2o9. 
Monro, 153. 
Monroe, 214 247. 
VIoody, 18. 
More, 52 102 152 181 

247 248 252. 
Morgan, 43 44 47 49 53 

1.53. 
Morris. 214 241. 
Mortimore, 54. 
Morton, 230. 
Moses, 53. 
Moseley, 62. 
Moss, 133. 
Mott, 138 150 244. 
MoultoD, 151. 
Mu;lin, 52 
.Mumford, 51 153 245. 



Index to Names in Volume 1. 



I 



Muuks, 24(). 

Murphy, 128 151. i 

Muny, 152 243. 

Myers, 11(5. 

Mynard, 215. 

Nabb, 128. 

Negers, 247. 

Mewbury, 213. ' 

Newman. 153. 

Newton, 209. 

Nevers, 5. 

Nixerson. 248. 

Nicklis, 126. 

NicholP, 53 126 151 152 
153 221 247 248. 

Ninnegret, 53. 

Nixon, 248. 

Noble, 5 42 46 189 213. 

Norris, 31. 

Northup, 245 246. 

Nowell, 87. 

Noyes, 32 49. 

Odiome, 181. 

Opdyke, 165. 

Oliver, 8. 

Olney, 99. 

Omen, 127. 

Orne, 34. 

Otis, 46 47 48 49 50 96 
186 187 215. 

Overland, 124. 

Oveiing, 99 100. 

Packard, 102. 

Packer, 181. 

Paddock, 224. 

Page, 105. 

Palmer, 14 144 188 189. 

Parham, 125. 

Park 216. 

Parke, 67 69 70 78 84 88 

Parker, 58 63 74 90 99 
102 105 128 181. 

Parkman, 32. 

Paine, 70, 83. 

Parliament, 151. 

Parsons, 85 153 246. 

Pate, 53. 

Partridge, 83 87. 

Pattee, 229 230 231 232. 

Patten, 7 48. 

Patterson, 48 116. 

Paul, 98 101 102 103 
106 107 108. 

Payson, 81 82 88 89 90 
216. 

Peaton, 213. 

Pearce, 125 126 129 130 
131 132 133 134 
135 136 137 138 
139 140 141 142 



143 144 145 146 
147 148 150 192 
244 248. 

Pearson. 7 127. 

Peck 69 83. 

Peckbam, 51 124 126 128 

151 244 245 246 
248. 

Peirce, 16 18 148 180 

181 182. 
Pender, 247. 
Pendleton, 116. 
Penhallow, 16 17 18. 
Perkins, 49 77 152 241. 
Perrepont, 209. 
Perry, 24 143 150 247 

249. 
Peppt rell, 225. 
Peters, 30 31 33. 
Peterson, 51 245. 
Pettes, 126. 
Pettis, 125. 
Petyface, 244. 
Phalan, 49. 
Phelps, 146 184. 
Phillips, 51 53 54 102 

105 126 128 100 

152 246 247 248. 
Phipps, 87 104. 
Pierce, 74 137. 
Pike, 72 151 241. 
Pinneger, 128 152. 
Pitkin, 81. 
Pitkin, 184 185. 
Pitts, 315. 
Place, 126. 
Plimton, 75. 
Piatts, 126. 
Pollock, 53. 
Pocueroy, 80. 
Poole, 114 243. 
Porter, 7 14 80 83 96. 
Portise, 88. 
Post, 215. - 
Potter, 55 99 102 104 

105 117 146 217 

245 247. 
Powers. 55. 
Powndl, 3. 
Pratt, 163. 
Preble, 6. 
Pren, 102 104. 
Prescott, 99 100 101 106 

107 216. 
Prew, 104. 
Price, 54 247. 
Prince, 34 35 103 187. 
Prior, 117 124 125. 
Prold, 249. 
Proud, 153. 



Prout, 184. 
Pryor, 55 128. 
Pulfry, 124 
Pull en, 58 63. 
Pulsifer, 120. 
Purchace, 54. 
Purdy, 193 195. 
Putnam, 14 15. 
PyncbeoD, 78. 
Qaincy, 9 12 229 231. 
Kains, 210. 
Rale, 159. 
Ralph, 102 105. 
Randall, 58 88. 
Rantoui, 110. 
Rathburn, 124. 
Rawley, 213. 
Raymond, 19 45 46 47 
164 187 188 189 

213 214 215. 
Read, 127 128 153 245. 
Reed. 120 125 126 151. 
Rediat, 64 68. 
Remington, 54 152 245, 
Reynolds, 163 164 244. 
Rhodes. 55 lo3 152 248. 
Rice, 72 79 89 137 191. 
Rich, 5. 

Richards, 42 214 245. 
Richardson, 15 53 150 

182. 
Rickerson, 243. 
Rider, 53 55 128 152 167. 
Hinge, 181. 
Riley, 128. 
Rix 125. 
Robinson, 65 68 71 89 

124. 
Robertson, 249. 
Rockwood, 74. ' 
Rodders, 15. 
Rogers 47 49 51 52 53 

54 55 125 127 151 

153 188 189 213 

214 215 249. 
Rolfe, 72 252. 
Root, 103. 
Ropes, 33. 
Rv^se, 3. 

Ross, 125 150 248. 
Rowell, 3. 
Row, 43 153. 
Ruggles, 58 76 90. 
Rushmore, 117. 
Russell, 120 142 245. 
Ryan, 153 245. 
Sabimes, 51 52. 
Sabins, 53, 152. 
Safford, 80 246. 
Salford, 245. 



1 

Index to Names in Volume L 



Salisbury, 114 164 224. 
Salmon, 197. 
Salt on stall, 38 40 41 93. 
Sanfoid, 51 125 153 245 

246 247 249. 
Sargent, 7. 
Satterly, 118. 
Saunders, 116. 
Savage, 65 75 112 176. 
Sawdey, 124. 
Sayer, 151. 
Sayward, 256. 
Scarborough, 70 90. 
Scarrott, 43. 
Scarritt, 42. 
Scoby, 241. 

Scott, 11 90 125 166 247. 
Scranton, 248. 
Scribner, 102. 
Seagais, 153. 
Searles, 89. 
Selleck, 77. 
Sergeant, 87 128. 
Sewall, 62. 
Shantuck, 215. 
Sharp, 87 167. 
Shatswell. 116. 
Shaw, 125 127 150 151 

214. 
Shearman, 51 55 126 

151 153 247. 
Shearmand, 51. 
Sheffield, 51 53 124 126 

127 152 247 248. 
Sheldon, 53 78 86 126. 
Shepard, 70 232 247. 
Sherburn, 7 16. 
Sherman, 55 102 105 148 

244. 
Sherwood, 50. 
Shrieve, 50 127. 
Shoul, 128. 
Sibbins, 128. 
Silliraan, 177. 
Silsbee, 226. 
Silvester, 88. 
Simmons, 49 105 249. 
Sims, 128. 

Simpson, 15 92 246 249 
Sinkins, 126 151. 
Sinnett, 128. 
Sisson, 102 105 125 225 

249. 
Sixles, 248. 
Skelton, 28 29 30. 
Sleads, 119. 

Slocum, 54 125 245 247 
Smart, 3. 
Snith, 28 29 63 54 57 

58 70 75 78 83 100 



102 105 124 125 
133 139 151 152 
153 154 155 156 
157 158 160 178 
189 199 207 213 
214 215 244 245 
247 247. 

Snell 246. 

Snow, 7 109 166 190. 

Sohier, 110. 

Sole, 153. 

SoUey, 181. 

Somes, 182. 

Soutbwick, 127 152. 

Sowle, 125. 

Sparger, 152 

Sparhawk, 33. 

Sparks, 55. 

Spalding, 256. 

Spaulding, 256. 

Spence-, 124 132 244 
246. 

Spenier, 52. 

Spear, 246. 

Spillane, 183. 

.Spink, 145. 

Spinnev, 152. 

SpooneV, 53 55 153 245. 

Sprague, 116 120. 

Spriugford, 127. 

Springer, 53 221. 

Squire, 214. 

Stacy, 127 249. 

Stacey, 151. 

Stallban, 66. 

Staulev, 80. 

Stanton, 33 53 99 102 
104 105 124 128 
144 214 216 217 

247 249. I 
Starbuck, 244. 

Stark, 146 147. 
Starr, 38 85 113. 
Stearns, 180. 
Stebbins, 49 77 79 84 

116. 
Stedman, 90. 
Steel, 44. 
Sterling, 215. 
Stennett, 199. 
Stevens, 55 76 79 243 

248 249. 
Steward, 127. 
Stiles, 171. 
Stoddard, 83 246. 
Stonal, 52. 
Stone, 36 83 85. 
Stoll, 45. 
Story, 54 67. 
Storrs, 80 81. 



Stranae, 249. 
Stratton, 65 66. 
Strickland, 222. 
Strong, 65 67 79 74. 
Summeis, 16 55. ..^^.^J 
Swan, 244. 
S waster, 244. 
Sweet. 126 130 140 148 

221 249. 
SyWester, 128 152 153. 
Taber, 245 246. 
Tabor, 128 245. 
Talcott, 76 84. j 

Telford. 53. 
i aim an, 195. 
Tanier, 54. 
Tarbeil, 81. 
Tarrient, 151. 9 
Tatman, 73. 



Tayer, 126. 

Taylor, 7 52 54 124 125 
126 127 153 225 

243 247. 
Tears, 249. 
Ttfft, 139. 
Tennaut. 215 245. 
Terry, 119. 
Tew, 52, 152 246. 
Tewels, 124. 
Tbayer, 87. 
Thomlin, 5o. 
Thompson, 19 46 48 52 

' 71 126 153 215. 
Thomas, 7 55 102 132 

145 150 247. 
Thoresby. 65 67. 
Tbroop' 81. 
Thornton, 174. 
Thurston, 51 5ii 53 75 
128 150 152 153 

244 247 249. 
Tilden, 90. 
Tileston, 76. 
Tilley, 51 64 250. 
Tillingbast, 51 52 54 

125 135 147 248. 
Tinker, 214. 
Tiedale, 77. 
Todd, 192. 
Tomlin, 53, 248. 
Tompkins, 52 127 243. 
Tooker, 154 160. 
Toombs, 96. 
Tophara, 105 106 152. 
Toirey, 90 173 178 198 

201 248. 
Totman, 65 73. 
Tourtelotte, 4. 
Townsend, 127 143 153 

249. 



Index to Names in Volume 1. 



Tracy, 1^0. 
Traitor, 4 7. 
Treat, 4 0. 
Tronicke, 100. 
Trott. 89 119. 
TrDwbnilife, 55 127. 
' Tripp, 52 125 128 13S 

153 243 248. 
Truman, 213 
Trumbull, 110 155 159 

160 
Tucker. 54 79 132 151 

152. 
Tador, 49. 
Tuell, 127 
Turnt-r, 69 73 74 75 151 

213 214. 
Tustiti, 168. 
Tuttle, 46 47 49 207. 
Tweedy, 143. 
Twichell, 74. 
Tynp, 229 232 233 234 

235, 
Tyrou, 166. 
Tyley, 248. 
Upbam, 31 35 256. 
ITiidePvvooa, 124 248. 
Vanbine, 124 
VasselLs, 152. 
Vaughn. 17 152 243 245 

246 
Veogg, 249 
VernoD, 244. 
Vetch, 82. 
Viall, 132 245. 
Viber, 43 44 45 46 96 

215 
Vickery, 151 247. 
Vinsou, 53 125. 
Viuvrecum. 153. 
VoUett, 187. 
Vose, 65, 125. 
WadH, 150 246. 
Waite, 167. 
Walderu'c', 97. 
Waldo, 4. 
Wale, 102 105. 
Waltord, 54. 
Walker, 52 110 125 146 

150 243. 
Walkiosr, 151. 
Wall, 255. 
Wallbndi^e, 80. 
Wallingford, 181. 
Walshire, .54. 
Walto)), 30, 
Wauton, 153 245. 
Ward, 58 120 126 167. 
Warhara, 76 83. 
Warren, 79 88 2.56. 



Warrin, 51. 

Washing 'ou, 10 220. 

Waters, 22 225, 

Watts, 153. 

Watson, 102. 

Wauket, 215. 

Way, 49. 

Weare. 225. 

Weaver, 102 105 118 119 

126 243 245. 
Webster. 3 4. 
Wedon, 52 53. 
Weedon, 124 126 127 142 

247 248. 
Weeks, 49 
Weld, 75 76 88 90. 
Welles, 74. 
Wells, 47 80 119 150 

195. 
Welsh, 242. 
WentwoiTh, 16 17 181. 
Went, 52 54 84 150 151 

214 243 244, 
W« stbrook, 3. 
Wethers, 150. 
Wetharel), 125. 
Wetters, 128. 
Wever, 51. 
'Vhaby, 187 189 214 
'Wheelpr, 4 15 78 79 84 

85 89 109 120 217 

240 
Wheel')ck, 74. 
Wheelwright, 176. 
Whipple, 7 183 189 213 

215. 
Whilaker, 33. 
White, 37 55 79 80 101 

125 215 249. 
Whitehorn, 249. 
Whitfield, 32. 
Whitefijid, 53. 
WhitiEig, 45 46 47 75 90 

119. 
Whitlock, 225. 
Whitman, 126 248. 
Whittnore, 66. 
Whitney, 49 61 105 231. 
Wibird, 181. 
Wickes, 131. 
Wick wire, 42 44 45 46 

48. 
Wight, 60 74. 
vVignoroD, 126. 
Wilber, 54 127 243. 
Wilbour, 55 249. 
Wil cocks, 125. 
Wilcox. 53 99 102 104 

105 126 128 152 

249. 



Wilder, 7. 

Wiley, 140. 

Wilkey, 240 248. 

Williams, 9 20 21 22 23 

i;9 30 42 44 45 

47 59 Qi 65 65 

67 68 69 70 71 

72 73 75 76 78 

69 80 81 82 83 

84 85 86 87 88 

90 91 99 101 102 

103 104 110 111 113 

117 118159 163 168 

169 174 213 214 216 

217 248. 

Williamson, 6. 

Willie ,244. 

Willis, 24.3. 

Willit, 53 

Wilson, 53 82 248. 

Wiliough(>y, 189 223. 

Winchester, 76. 

Wmg, 52 216. 

Winstanley, 245. 

Wintbrop, 169 176 183 
233 234 236 237 
238. 

WJDslow, 128 183. 

wize, 71. 

Witson, 54. 

Witter, 213. 

Wright, 81 82126152 215 
229 231 232 233 234 
236 237. 

Writson, 151. 

Wood, 65 67 82 116 118 
152 248 159 160. 

Wood bridge, 76. 

VVoodbury, 110. 

Woodcock, 58. 

"Wood mac, 153 247. 

Woodmansey, 113. 

Woodward, 128. 

Woodworth, 215. 

Wolcott, 80. 

Woolsey, 95. 

Worgaus, 153. 

Worrin, 127. 

Worth, 246. 

Wyatt, 51. 

Fates, 249. 

Y'ork 217- 

FouQg, 49 54 55 126 

Zathbury, 151. 



()Ua(ga3ine 



OF 



(Ueio) (&ngfanb '^wtot^. 



A^ol-ame II. 



NSWPOI^T, I^. I. 



IS^^. 



R, HAMMETT TILLEY, 
Editor and Publisher, 
Newport, R. I. 



@ v^^T- 



® 



i 



CONTENTS. 



Analysisof the claims of Soutliold, L. I. for Priorit}' of settle- 
ment over Southampton, L. I., Win. Wallace looker. 1 
The Descendants of John Holmes, of Jefferson, N. H., and 

his wife, Polly Goodall Dr. L. E. Holmes. 16 

An Interesting Pamphlet. — A few Remarks upon some of the 

Votes and Resolutions of the Continental Congress, 1774 42 
Extracts from the Letter Boor of Samuel Hubbard, Ray 

Greene Ruling 59 170 242 

The streets of Newport, R.I Benj. B. Howland. 77 

English Parish Registers Col. J. L. Vivian. 94 

Some Descendants of John Coggeshall, first President of the 
"Province of Providence Plantations" Gen. T. L 

Casey 99 

Letter of Benjamin Waterhouseto Sir Joseph Banks, 1816. . 106 

Letter of General Greene to John Collins, 1783 108 

Search for the Grave of the Mother of Hookers Ill 

The Genealogists of Nantucket .0. P. Allen, 115 

Extracts from the Friends Records, Portsmouth, R. I., re- 
lating to the family of Anthony 118 

Land in Stonington, Conn., sold for the use of the Pequot In- 
dians, 1 6X8 Hon. Richard A. Wheeler. 1 28 

Record of Marriages by Rev. Gardner Thurston, Pastor of 
the Second Baptist Church, Newport, R. I.. 1759- 

1800 1 43, 205, 261 

Early Education in New England. .Hon. Thomas W. Bicknell. 149 
The United Compan}' of Spermaceti Chandlers 1761. 

George C. Mason 165 

Sketch of the Life of Captain William Torrey. Samuel W. 

Reed 177 

Extracts from the Friends Records of Portsmouth, R. I., re- 
lating to the family of Almy 172 

James Skiff, of Sandwich, Mass., and some of his Descend- 
ants 0. P. Allen 185 

Inquisitions Post Mortem Col. J. S. Vivian. -01 

John Myles. Religious Tolerance in Massachusetts. Hon. T. 

W. Bicknell 213 

Extracts from the Friends Records of Portsmouth, R. I., re- 
lating to the family of Borden 246 



iv CONTENTS. 

DEPAF^T]VIE]MTS. 

XoTES.— The Bicknells, 66. David Frothingham, 67. The 
Oldest hou&e in Connecticut, 68. Early Greenbackers 
in Rhode Island, 68. Ml. Desert Island, 127. Pearce 
Fainil}^ 134.^ An Ancient Thanksgiving Proclamation, 
135. A Revolutionary Flag, 136. An Historic Bell, 
137. Portrait of one of the old School Gentlemen of 
a Century ago, 187. Pierce-Moulton, 188. Knapp 
Family, 190. Markham Family, 191. Cone family 
of Connecticut, 191. Diary of a trip from Boston to 
Albany, 1776, 11)2. Land sold for the use of the 
Pequot Indians, 1683,192. The Manufacture of Nails, 
204. The Old Thomsonville Ferry, 253. Rhode 
Island Coal Mine, 254. An interesting memento, 256. 
Fitchburg, Mass., 256. 

Queries. — A Funeral Ring, 1775, 69. Holloway Ancestry, 
69. Rev. Moses Sweat, 69. Brookline, N. H., 70. 
Armstrong-Halce, 70. Earles-Brayton, 70. Windsor 
Prison, Vt., 70. Indian Lands in Connecticut, 70. 
Douglas-Mattle, 70. Tompkins, 138. Tillinghast, 
139. Mayo, 139. The Town Sergeant and his Drum, 
139. William Goodell Field, 140. Rogers, 140. 
Aimy, 140. Cutler, 140. Manchester-Eldred, 141. 
The Survey of Vermont, 1791, 141. Dixon or Dickson, 
142. Carr, 194. Cone, 194. Seabury, 195. May, 
195,196. Family of General Greene, 195. Mumford, 
195. The Compact of the Pilgrims, 196. Smith, 196. 
Adams, 196. Rootes-Gale, 196. Chapman, 197. 
Delano, 197. Paige, 197. Tubbs-Lawrence, 198. 
Richardson, 198. Clarke- Wanton, 198. Capt. John 
Morgan of New London, 1694, 198. Simmons, 199. 
Benson, 199. Chapman-Kaighn, 199. Clarke-Hacker, 

199. Cole, 199. Ayrault, 257. Cornell, 257. Cur- 
tis, 257. Hill, 257. Barton, 258. Graves, 258. 
Pearce, 258. Aldrich, 259. Brigham, 259. Litter, 
259. Clarke, 260. 

Replies TO Queries. — A Funeral Ring, 1775, 142. Rev. 
Moses Sweat, 142. Windsor Vt., Prison, 200. Mayo, 

200. Greene Family, 200. Delano, 260. 

Editorial Notes. — Memorial to John Robinson, 71. New 
Hampshire and Rhode Island, 72. Gorham, Me., 
Records, 72. Stories of Salem Witchcraft, 73. The 
Public Schools of Boston, 73. The Old Constitution 
House, Vt., 73. ♦ 

Book Notes.— 74, 147, 208, 269. 




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]V{^GAZINE OfJ\(eW 2nGLANDJ{iST0RY 

Vol.2. JANaARY/i892. No. 1. 

Analysis of the Claims of Southold, L. L, 

FOR PRIORITY OF SETTLEMENT OVER SOUTHAMPTON, 

L. L, AND HOW THEY ARE DISPROVED BY THE 

EARLY RECORDS AND CONTEMPORARY 

MANUSCRIPTS. 



BY WM. WALLACE TOOKER. 



^^txRADITION, with its romantic vaga,ries and illusory 
^11 recitals, quickly obliterates or distorts every vestige 
^11 j of fact, and carries tlie historian away into a perfect 
^^ labyrinth of error. A period of time, looking through 
a vista of two hundred and fifty years, is inappreciable at the 
present moment, and minutely considered, is but an atom in 
the chemistry of our thoughts. Occurrences of twenty, ten, 
or even five years past, cannot be recalled without some 
boundary-mark to guide our memory. So it is with early 
events, unless carefully noted, and preserved, the}^ are soon 
passed into oblivion. Settlements that were j^lanted in the 
dawn of the colonial period are now celebrating their anni- 
versaries. The desire for knowledge concerning these early 
towns and their people, is rapidly growing. Historical data 
and reminiscences rebating to both, are found where least 
expected ; they come up before us like mushrooms in a night, 
and the end is not yet. The publishing of the first records — 
torn, faded, and moth-eaten — is doing far more than its 
greater share in dispelling the myths of tradition in which 
truth has been buried for generations. May the good work 
continue until the sum of our knowledge is complete, with 



2 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

notluiig lacking. The two towns on Long Island, first set- 
tled by tlie English, celebrated tlieir two-and-a-half centuries 
of existence in tlie summer of 1890 ; Southampton theirs 
on the 12th of June, because on that date in the year 1640, 
James Farrett granted a patent for land, which was then 
in their i)Ossession, with houses erected ; Southold theirs on 
the 21st of August, not because that date represented any- 
thing historic, but because it was a convenient day, and a 
larger crowd could be brought together at that time. The 
claims of Southampton have been fully set forth b}'- the 
*Hon Henry P. Hedges, fGreo. R. Howell, A. M., and JWm. 
S. Pelletreau. A. M. These historians have covered all the 
ground so far as that town is concerned, and prove by con- 
temporary, corroborative and historical evidence, which com- 
mends itself to every unprejudiced mind, that Southampton 
was settled by the emigrants from Lynn, Mass., in the spring 
of 1640. 

Let us look into the claims made on behalf of Southold — 
claims still grasped at as a drowning man clutches a floating 
chip — in the light of indisputable facts. Rev. Epher Whita- 
ker, in his history of Southold, 1881, p. 41, reiterated in 
various articles on the subject of the town's anniversary, con- 
tributed to the Brooklyn Eagle, on July 12, 1890, and to 
other papers during the spring and summer of that year, 
makes the assertion that Southold obtained her Indian deed 
in the summer of 1640. Thus endeavoring to antedate that of 
Southampton by several months. This claim is also echoed, 
through the influence of Rev. Mr. Whitaker, by Mrs. 
Martha J. Lamb, in the Magazine of American History for 
October 1890, p. 280, in the following words: — "the testi- 
mony shows that some of them were in Southold as early as 
the summer at 1638, if not before, although the exact date 
when the ground was first broken is not known. There 
seems to be no lack of evidence as to its priority over South- 

*Address before the Suffolk Co., N. Y. Hist. Soc. Oct. i, 1889. 
tWhen Southampton and Southold were settled, 1882. 
tMunsill's Hist. Suffolk Co., N. Y., (Southold town.) 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 6 

ampton. The church was regularly organized on the 21st of 
October 1640, about two months after the title had been ob- 
tained from the Indians, which according to the records was 
just a little ahead of its neighbor. Four days later it is re- 
corded that one of the settlers sold his land with the house 
upon it and other improvements for c£5, which points to the 
probability of his having been an inhabitant of the place 
since 16S9, if not longer." This is all sheer assumption. 
There is absolutely no authority on which any of these claims 
is based. It is a distortion of the records, that would not be 
tolerated in any court of law. They might just as well 
claim that Columbus first landed on Long Island in 1492, as 
to say settlers were there in 1638. No Indian deed what- 
ever, can be found bearing the date of 1640. None is even 
alluded to, as having been given in that year. 

Being greatly interested in everything appertaining to the 
aboriginal history of Long Island, especially for the informa- 
tion, philological, typographical, and ethnological that can be 
found in her Indian deeds, I wrote to a friend in Southold 
asking for a copy of this deed — unknown to me and to 
others — so much claim had been made and so widely pub- 
lished, I took it for granted, that they must have some basis 
for it: I was informed that the Indian deed in question 
would be found on pages 112 to 116 of the 1st volume of the 
printed records of Southold. No Indian deed appears on any 
of those pages, but on page 112 is found a copy of James 
Farrett's deed to Richard Jackson, dated August 15th, 1640, 
for "fifty acres of meadow and upland lying and being upon 
the North of the River called Mahansuck to the Eastward of 
the place commonly called the Five Wigwams. Together 
with a hundred acres of upland, adjoyinge to the aforesaid 
fifty acres to the Northwest of it." On October 25th follow- 
ing, Richard Jackson, Carpenter, conveys the same land, then 
called Hashamommuck Neck, together with a house that he 
had erected upon it, to Thomas Weatherly, Mariner. These 
transactions occur two and four months after Farrett's second 
grant to the Southampton colonists. No mention whatever 



4 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOHY. 

of any Indian claim or deed. Stephen Goodyeare of New 
Haven, as entered on the 116th page, sells the same tract to 
Jolni Ketchum, as belonging to him both from Jackson and 
Weatherly and by the Indian title. In the 2nd Vol. of the 
Records p. 95, dated 1666, Ketchum's deed to Thomas Moore 
for the same, gives us: — "Whereas Stephen Goodyeare * * * 
became legally possessed of the aforesaid several conveyances 
and of the interest in all the afore recited premises, as also of 
the Indian title thereunto.^' *Mr. Whitaker acknowledges 
that the Indian deeds almost invariably followed the English 
occupation, and he quotes the instances. These deeds show 
no exception, and prove conclusively, that the Indian title to 
this tract on which Southold's claim is based, was subsequent 
to both the Jackson and Weatherly deeds, and was obtained 
some time previous to 1653, the date of Goodyeare's convey- 
ance to Ketchum. f Charles B. Moore in his Anniversary 
Address at Southold says : "Goodyeare bought it from Weath- 
erly on Oct. 22d, 1640." This is a decided lapsus calami^ for 
that is three days previous to Weatherly's ownership. Mr. 
Moore is greatly mistaken in naming any date, for there is 
no record, nothing in fact, to show what year it came into 
Goodyeare's possession. It is not probable that it was synch- 
ronous with Weatherly's deed from Jackson, but, if it was, 
then the land must have been abandoned for thirteen years, 
for Goodyeare never lived upon it. 

Now the question arises, what year was the Indian title 
purchased? Was it in 1640 as claimed? No I All trace of 
the Indian deed for this part of the Island, was lost for many 
years. It is not mentioned in any history of Long Island. 
No copy was known to be in existence, but one has been 
found. Those interested in its discovery do not seem to 
recognize its application and bearing on this mooted ques- 
tion. Had it been known to the late J. Wickham Case, it 
would have changed the tenor of many of his notes to the 
1st and 2d volume of the printed records of Southold. 

*History of Southold, p. 39. 
tSouthold's Celebration, p. 127. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 5 

Eight years had flown between the time Jackson sold out to 
Weatherly and the date of the Indian deed to Goodyeare 
and associates. It is stated to have taken place on May 16, 
1648, by a copy made by the Recorder of Southold, from 
1662 to 1674, which he states to be "A True coppie of the 
original by mee Richard Terry." This time stained paper 
was formerly in the library of the late J. Carson Brevoort, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and is now on sale at Dodd and Mead's 
N. Y. It is also on record in the office of Secretary of State, 
Albany, N. Y. A brief abstract is : '-'-Mammaivetougli^ Sa- 
chem of Cor change grants to Theophilus Eaton, Esq., Gov- 
ernor of New Haven, Stephen Goodyeare, Deputy Gouer, 
and Capt. Malborn of New Haven * * * all that tract or 
neck of land by some called Hasshamommuck Neck beginning 
at a creek called and known by the name Paueakatum^ 
bounded on the west by land in the occupation of William 
Salmon, extending itself to the eastward towards Plum 
Island, the breadth thereof also to the North and South See, 
etc." This is not a confirmatory deed of an earlier pur- 
chase, but is the first and only deed of that tract. It states, 
however, that a deed was drawn ten days previous, which did 
not recognize the Indian Uxquepassun' s claim, so another had 
to be drawn. 

Richard Jackson in his deed of October, 1640, is said to 
have been of ^^Yennacock.''^ Hereby hangs another claim — 
that it means Southold village. It does not follow that it 
means that limited tract. The earl}^ records do not indicate 
it, and the few times the name appears, seem to designate 
the whole of that part of Long Island, without regard to any 
particular spot. Charles B. Moore admits this, where he 
says of a *New Haven record : — "This f request shows that 
it was not intended to confine the name '-^Yennycott'^ to Mr. 
Goodyeare's purchase." Mr. Moore is mistaken in consider- 
ing this name, and that of tlie Shelter Island Sachem, Yoco^ 
Yoiighcoe^ Rougkcoe^ or Yovaivan^ to be synonymous, for they 



*r) 



Rec. N. H. Colony, Vol i, p. 97. 
tSoutholcl's Celebration, pp. 134, 139, 150. 



6 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

are not ; one is a personal name as all its variations prove, 
and the other a simple descriptive place-name. Now, as for 
its etj-mology and application. Yean, Yaano, Yenny, etc., is 
the Long Island dialectic equivalent of the Massachusetts 
Yden = 'extended.' The terminal affix — cock, is a corrup- 
tion by the English of auk-ut, sometimes abbreviated to kut, 
or cot. It is found in many Indian names of places on Long 
Island. Roger Williams in the Narragansett, wrote it awkit, 
and as a place-name terminal, signifies, 'land,' or 'country,' 
which gives us the compound name of Yaen-auk-ut 'at the 
extended country.' See the Indian deed, where the land is 
said to be 'extending itself eastward,' as if those who drew 
the deed knew its meaning. This is repeated in other rec- 
ords. Those Indians living at Ucquehaug— head of the bay 
(at Pehik-konuk, "the little plantation," from which the Pe- 
conic River and Bay takes its name) were also called the 
Yeanocock Indians by the Montauk Sachem in 1667, all of 
which corroborates our study. Does it apply to the South- 
old settlement alone ? No ! But it does apply to the whole 
territory, and there it belongs. 

Mr. Moore is also mistaken in designating the body of 
water that flows between Greenport and Shelter Island as a 
river. James Farrett would not have so called it. It is al- 
ways designated as tlie 'south sea' in the early days. It is 
not a river in any sense of the word. No Indian would have 
called it a — suck, a term that was applied to the "mouth of 
a stream," or '^outlet of a pond," etc. It is a common affix 
to many Indian names of places. The "Fifty acres" did not 
lie north of this body of water, called by Mr. Moore repeat- 
edly, the Manhansett river. It lay, according to the record, 
"North of the river called Mahansuck. "The etymology of this 
name describes the stream exactly, so that we can identify it 
beyond question. Manhan, 'an Island,'— si<.(?/{j, 'an outlet,' 
as a whole, "the Island outlet." This describes the outlet 
of Pipes Neck Creek, near Greenport, which has to-day, 
as well as two-and-a-half centuries ago, a small Island 
of woods at its mouth. Therefore this tract of fifty 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 7 

acres, lies north of the mouth of this creek, and is 
included in the Indian purchase of 1648, for the creek 
called '-'-PaucakatiLYi'' (or Paucuckatux, in another entry) 
is Pipes Neck Creek, in its entire length. This being 
the parallel of the Massachusetts, or in the Natick dia- 
lect, Pohquta-tuk^ 'the dividing tidal-stream, or river,' be- 
cause it divided or separated Wm. Salmon's purchase of 
1645, and also that of 1648. *The late J. Wickham Case 
was inclined to think the "Five Wigwams" had lost all means 
of identity, and suggested the small Island of woods as its 
location. As will be seen, this could not be, for the land 
was "to the eastward" of the wigwams, not to the north. I 
would suggest as their proper location the "Salmon Neck," 
by some called the true "Hashamomuk," where the several 
swamps and tracts of land (Indian corn fields) were located 
that were exempted from purchase in the Indian deed to 
Salmon in 1645. They were at that time called ^'Poylias^ 
Weahewanopp^ Mantoohaugs and Sonnquoquas. These are 
all personal names of Indians living at those places, and rep- 
resent four and perhaps the whole five of the wigwams. 
Weekewanopp in '1648, with liis three brothers, gave a deed 
to Gov. Eaton and others for the tract called Mattatuk.f 
Uxquepassun^ one of the thiee, had to be satisfied by the chief 
Mammaivetongh in the Hasliamomuk purchase, as he claimed 
an ancient right in the land, f iVnother called Noweconyiey 
or ^Yowonocogus^ together with \Sonnquoquaesick and other 
chief men, signed the deed to Sjdvester for Shelter Island in 
1652, showing that all belonged to the family of Sachems, 
and lived in the vicinity. Locating the "Five Wigwams" on 
the Salmon or Hashamomuk Neck proper, agrees perfectly 
with the i^oints of the compass as given by Farrett in his 
deed to Jackson, and is corroborative evidence that the neck 
and land to the west were unoccupied by the whites in Au- 
gust, 1640. 

*Soutbold Rec. Vol. i, pp. ii8, 208. 210. 
tBrookhaven Rec. Vol 1, p. 77. 
iEast Hamptpn Rec, Vol. i, p. 97. 



8 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Anotlier claim by Mr. Whitaker, agreed toby Mrs. Lamb, 
is that the settlement was so old in October, 1640, that Jack- 
son was able to sell his dwelling house and other improve- 
ments, wliich point to his having been a settler as early as 
1639 or earlier. Here they ignore the fact entirely that Jack- 
son never owned the land until two months previous. 
Further, if he was the same Richard Jackson of Cambridge 
as supposed, who laid out Sudbury, Mass., in 1687, who 
was fined <£5 on the 22d of May, 1639, for going to Con- 
necticut, and who is said to be still of Cambridge on Aug. 7, 
1640, according to a letter of attorney. This being eight 
days before he bought the land of Farrett, he could not have 
been on Long Island in 1639 or earlier as a settler. The 
deed was probably drawn at Boston, as near as we can learn. 
Farrett was there the most of that month, possibly all of it. 
Jackson was in trouble and was persecuted through no fault 
of his own, and to escape it, went away until his affairs could 
' be straightened out. His fine was at last remitted in Septem- 
ber, 1640, and he went back to Cambridge after his sale to 
Weatherly. Li the eighteen days that had passed, between 
Farrett's first grant to the Southampton settlers for the 
"eight miles square," and the time they were arrested by the 
Dutch soldiers under Van Tienhoven, on May 15, 1640,* 
they had already built one house and had another in progress, 
showing that the houses of that period were primitive in 
their character, built of hewn timber, "catted, daubed, and 
creek thatched," as was also Jackson's. 

Jackson and Weatherly were but temporary sojourners — 
in fact, we have no knowledge that the latter ever lived 
there — and the erection of this house, vacant and abandoned 
for many years while in Goodyeare's possession, does not 
make a settlement any more than the placing of a fisher- 
man's cabin on our shores, or a woodchopper's turf and log 
hut in our woods. We might also say, any more than Capt. 
Gosnold's temporary occupation of the most westerly of the 

*Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. 2, p. 146. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 9 

Elizabeth Islands in the winter of 1602 3, began the settle- 
ment of New England. 

Time and again it has been asserted that the records of 
Southold infer a settlement in 1639 or 40, by one Matthew 
Sinderland or Sutherland. This is based principally on the 
following (Vol. 1, pp. 168-9, dated 1661) : "These p'sents 
witness to all it may an}^ wise concerne, that whereas one 
William Salmon sometyme of Hashammomuck neere South- 
old on Long Island, blacksmith, deceased, in his lifetime was 
married unto Katherine the relect widdowe of Matthew Sun- 
derland, seaman, who was then possessed of HaHhamommucTc 
aforesaid, for and on the behalf of James Farrett, agent to 
the Right honorable the Earl of Starling by vertue of a com- 
mission to him given by said Earle to dispose of Land on 
Long Island, etc." The late J. Wickham Case, who tries not 
to claim any more than he finds on record, in a note referring 
to this and other passages, says : — ''We find many very 
strong assurances that he was the first permanent settler and 
proprietor through Farrett in Hashamomatk and perhaps the 
' first settler in the town." I agree with Mr. Case, partly, in 
this opinion, but the above record does not imply proprietor- 
ship. It wa> submitted to several legal gentlemen for their 
opinion. They all agreed that Sinderland and his wife were 
simply tenants of Farrett, and placed by him on this land, to 
look out for his interest and in his behalf, he looking for- 
ward, probably to his prospective return to New England. 
The story of Hashamomuk is a long one. We cannot now 
go into it in detail. Sinderland, Salmon and others were 
looked upon as squatters by their neighbors to the west 
without title to the land on which they lived. They were at 
last admitted into the township and the title to their farms 
allowed them in 1662. 

Who was this Sinderland, about whom so much has been 
claimed and so little known ? Savao-e shows that he existed, 
nothing more. He was a seaman in the employ of James 
Farrett, the navigator and pilot of his "small shallop of four 
tunnes or thereabouts." He accompanied Farrett during all 



10 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

liis voyages of inspection in and among the cove indented 
lands of Long Island and Islands adjacent. He was with 
Farrett and the Southampton settlers from Lynn, Mass., in 
the spring of 1640. He witnessed their grant from Farrett 
on June 12, 1640, at New Haven. He *went to Boston with 
Farrett and obtained the deeds for land at Oyster Bay, L. I., 
on June 18, 1640. Although dated a year previous, it is 
easily proven in many ways to be an error of — probably in- 
tention. One proof of this never before given, is as follows : 
The first mention we can find of Farrett's being in America, 
is on June 7, 1639, at Boston,f where he draws a bill of 
exchange on the Earl of Sterling, for one hundred pounds 
of current money in England. This must have been soon 
after his arrival, for he says the following spring in his pa- 
tent to Lion Gardiner, dated March 10, 1639, O. S. March 
20, 1640, N. S.: — "Which Island hath been purchased before 
my coming from the ancient Inhabitants, the Indians, Nev- 
ertheless, though he the said Lion Gardiner had his posses- 
sion first from the Indians before my coming, jet is he now 
contented to hold the tenor and title of the possession of the 
above Island from the Earl of Sterling, etc." JGardiner 
bought the Island from the Indians on May 10, 1639. This 
limits Farrett's arrival to sometime between May 10 and June 
7, 1689. Consequently he could not have drawn the Sinder- 
land deeds for land which he had never seen, so soon after 
his arrival. History and fact point to its being located 
soon after the time the Southampton settlers were driven 
away from the same neighborhood by the Dutch, in May, 
1640. Sinderland never took possession of it, and its record 
at Southold twenty years afterv\^ards, was done in order to 
recover it from parties §then in possession, and it has no 
bearing whatever on the settlement of Southold. 

In order to follow in Sinderland's footsteps, it is stated, 

*Rec. of Southold, Vol i, pp 201, 202, 203, 204, 206. 
tArchaeologia American, Vol. 7, p. 8y. 
JArchaeologia Amer. Vol. i. pp. 207-8. 
§Col. Hist. N. Y., Vol. 14, p. 560. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 11 

that on Aug. 20, 1640, at Boston, *"Matthew Sutherland of 
Newporte, in the Island of Rhodes, was bound by bill to 
Thomas Robinson for <£4, to be payd Oct. 9th, 1640," thus 
showing that three months after the settlement of Southamp- 
ton, he gives his residence as being at Newport. Nine days 
later, and still at Boston,f "James Farrett makes a deed of 
gift to Thomas Robinson and Matthew Sutherland of one 
boate or small shallop of burden four tunnes or thereabouts, 
with main sayle, anchor, cable all new, and a compass with 
oares and appurtenances in paj^ment of twelve parts of a 
greater debt owing by him unto them." This tells a long 
story, were we to stretch it out. Southampton settlers from 
Lynn, after many vicissitudes, have been planted on their 
purchase. Farrett is back at Boston again, owing considera- 
ble money, and is probably tired of the whole business, it be- 
ing much more difficult to start a settlement than he antici- 
pated. The boat in which he explored the shores of Long 
Island, with its fittings all new that spring, he gives up in 
part payment of his debts, and Sinderland is not yet on 
Hashamomuk. 

JOn Oct. 1, 1640, Matthew Sunderland with 58 others, 
were admitted to be inhabitants of the Island called Aqueed- 
neck (Island of Rhode Island) having submitted themselves 
to the government that should be established according to 
the word of God, and Sinderland is not yet on Hashamomuk. 

The fact, as proven, that he was of Newport, R. I., during 
most, if not all, of the year 1640, places him entirely out of 
the question as far as the priority of Southold over South- 
ampton is concerned, but it does not militate against the 
late Mr. Case's belief and mine, that he was the first perma- 
nent settler through Farrett, not in 1689 or 40, but in the 
spring or summer of 1641. That this is the same person, is 
proven by the testimony § of VVm. Coolenge of Newport, 



*Aichaeologia Amer. Vol. i, p. 2S2. 
tArchceologia Amer. Vol. i, p. 301. 
tCol. Rec. of R. I., Vol. i, p. 90. 
§Rec. of Southold, Vol. i, p. 206. 



12 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 

then aged 60 (in 1662) who swore that he well knew both 
Mr. Farrett and Matthew Sinderland." Farrett, no doubt, 
made Newport his headquarters; being then only about a day's 
sail from this part of Long Island, made it very accessible. 

Another claim of the Southold historians, that is veiled in 
doubt and problematic tr adition, is the coming of the Rev. 
John Young, and company, and gathering his church anew 
on the 21st of October, 1640. I regard this as an error, and 
that the date should be 1641. There is no contemporary 
authority that states it to have occurred in the year 1640. 
The passage by Trumbull, given in his history of Connecti- 
cut (Vol. 1, page 119,) is probably a guess, from lack of pos- 
itive knowledge. It has been repeated with slight variation, 
by nearly every historian since. It was written by Trum- 
bull nearly one hundred and fifty years afterwards. Tradi- 
tion and error had taken the place of truth. Almost all of 
the men, said by Trumbull to have accompanied Young in 
that year to Long Island, are shown by the light of recent 
research to have come later, and at different periods. In 
error in one statement, he is so, no doubt, in the other. In 
fact, according to his tombstone, being the ''first settler of 
the Church of Christ in Southold," Young must have come 
alone. It is acknowledged that Young went there under the 
auspices and jurisdiction of the New Haven Colony. In 
sending him there, they must have had the right to do so. 
But there is no record whatever, that shows the New Haven 
Colou}^ or any of its people had any claim on any part of 
Long Island during the year 1640 ; nor had they purchased 
any land or made any efforts to do so. *The Farrett mort- 
gage of July 29, 1641, is their first claim, acquired through 
its Governor, Lieut. Governor, and principal merchants. No 
other paper, or a copy of one, is in existence or referred to. 
The condition of this deed was the repayment to the mort- 
gagees within three years of £110, together with the charges 
and improvements • in default of such payment, the title 
was to rest with them and their assigns. These charges and 

*Thompson's Hist. L. I., Vol. 2, p. 311. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HTSTOHY. 13 

improvements were what the mortgagees might make in the 
way of settlements. Through the power conferred by this 
paper, the New Haven Colony gave Minister Young permis- 
sion to locate on the "extended country," where in the fall of 
1641, he tried to gather his church together ; but who were 
the church ? The time of his coming to America has really 
no bearing on the subject unless he can be traced. The ship 
he came on is unknown, as is the date. He may have re- 
mained several years in Salem, Boston or elsewhere before 
going to Long Island. *The year 1638 saw the arrival of 
twenty ships which brought three thousand passengers, 
probably as many more in the years following. Very few 
can be traced to their homes in England or America, f The 
former home of Young is not known with absolute certainty. 
Hence his arrival and doings in this country previous to lo- 
cating on Long Island are simply guesses without an}^ foun- 
dation of fact. 

The records of the New Haven Colony by C. J. Hoadly 
Esq., on which so much stress has been laid by Mr. Moore, 
do not prove anything whatever, as to the assumed claims of 
Southold. On the contrarv, the record that John Touttle 
of Yennycok was appointed constable on April 2, J 1642, 
"till some further course be taken by this court for the settling 
of a magistracie there according to God," seem to follow and 
establish the fact that Minister Young went there the previ- 
ous fall, else the Colony would not have waited nearly two 
years before making this appointment which would have been 
the case had Young made a settlement in the fall of 1640 as 
claimed. It also shows that no church had been gathered 
together at that time. All the records — and the first rec- 
ords especially of the early townships — show that a constable 
was an absolute necessity in the ver}'' beginning. The only 
allusion to the date of settlement is found in a letter of re- 
monstrance, written in 1676 by §the Southold people, against 
taking out the Andros patent, one passage being: — "We 
have possessed our lands above 30 years, which is a matter 
of some weight in law." This would make the date any 
time before 1646, without fixing it definitely. T^ong Island, 
through the terms of the Farrett mortgage, lapsed to the 
mortgagees on July 29, 1644. It was after this ||that Wil- 

*Winthrop i, p. 268 

tHist. Southold (Whitaker,) pp. 20, 21, 22. Southold Celebration, p. loi. 

tN, H. Col Rec. Vol. i, p. 70. 

§Munseirs Hist. S. C. (Southold town.) 

llSouthampton Rec, Vol. i, pp. 27, 39, 53, 



14 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

liam Wells, who became very prominent, and who is said to 
have been one of the original settlers with Young in 1640, 
went to Southold, lor he was of Southampton in 1648, still 
owned land tliere in 1645, and in 1646 his name is among 
those who had left the town. 

*Thomas Lechford, to whom I am indebted for many of 
tlie facts mentioned in this paper, was a lawyer in active 
practice at Boston from June 27, 1638, to Aug. 3, 1641. He 
was well acquainted with our friends Fai-rett, Jackson, Sin- 
derland, Robinson and Weatherly. He drew the Indian 
deed for Gardiner's Island in 1639. Capt. Joseph Young of 
Salem, Master of the "Mary and Annie," later of Southold, 
is spread at length in a lawsuit in the same year. He refers 
to John Budd of Quinnapeage, (New Haven,) Sept. 10, 1640, 
Stephen Goodyear on same date, and many others. 

Mr. Edward E. Hale, the editor of Lechfords note Book, 
says in his introductory note : — ''It is one of the most valua- 
ble documents which have been preserved of the History of 
the first generation of Massachusetts. It is the daily record 
of work done in the office of the only professional lawyer in 
the colony. His duties brought him into close relation with 
people of every class ; and in more than one instance 
his memoranda throws light on social customs, on questions 
of local geography, on points of family history, and on the 
development of the political life of the country, etc." 

In Lechford's '■'Plain Dealing or News from New England," 
written in 1642, after his departure from the colony, he says : 
''Long Island is begun to be planted, and some two minis- 
ters are gone thither or to goe, as one master Pierson, and 
master Knowles, that was at Dover alias Northam, a church 
was gathered for that Island at Lynn, etc." Nothing what- 
ever about Young or his church. Lechford was familiar 
with Farrett's aims and desires in regard to the settling of 
Long Island, and speaking of the Southampton minister 
Pierson, shows that the planting of that town was well 
known to him. Had Young been also planted on the "ex- 
tended country" in the fall of 1640, by Farrett, Lechford 
would have mentioned its occurrence, but the evidence is, 
that it took place after his return to England. He sailed 
from Boston on August 3, 1641. 

The titie to the Southold plantation remained vested in 
New Haven until June 25, 1649, when : f'The plantation 

*Arcbaeolog-ia Amer. Vol. 7. 
IN. H. Col. Rec, Vol. i, p. 463. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 15 

of Southold upon Long Island are to have that plantation 
made over to them, and seeing it was purchased by this town, 
(New Haven,) it is by this town to be made over to them." 
Think for a moment what this quotation means, and 
consider its bearing on tlie following. It has been 
claimed by all the iSoiithold historians, that the earliest 
records were lost or destroyed. This is based on the 
following order of Feb. 5, 1651, O. S., Feb. 15, 1655, N. S. : 
*'Tt was then ordered and agreed forasmuch as there is a 
book to record Lands and the Mapps thereof soe badly de- 
cayed that some are past remedie, as also for prevention of 
such inevitable disturbance as will growe in case the same 
bee not seasonably recorded that everie man (who hath not 
alreadie) bringe into the Recorder a p'ticular of all his p'sells 
of Land, how they ly, East, West, North and South : be- 
tweene whom, and in what places, within one month after 
the publication hereof, under penalty of 5s. as also all after 
purchases and exchanges, within one month after the pur- 
chase or exchange made under the penalty." f The late J. 
Wickliam Case mistook the purport of this order entirely, 
and in a note, mournfull}^ soliloquized over the loss of the 
"Book to record lands and the Maps thereof and filled with 
the record of the transactions of the colony for the first 
fourteen years of its. existence, would now be the richest 
treasure this town could possess — a mine of facts and figures 
that would supply a deficienc}^ in our town's liistory wliich 
nothing else could fill." What a mighty claim for something 
tliat never existed ! What a misinterpretation of a record I 
Jf>liarles B. Moore misquotes the order by substituting ''no" 
in the place of "a," and adding "are" after "Mapps thereof," 
making it read : "forasmuch as there is 'no' book to record 
Lands and the Mapps thereof are so badly decayed, etc." 
"There is a book to record Lands," means simply a book then 
in being, ready for the recorder to enter tlierein, the lands of 
the dilatory owner (who hath not alreadie) done so. What 
book ? Why the book that begins ''anno domini 1651, as 
does the printed copy, called Liber A. Every part of this 
order points to it, and it means none other. "Mapps thereof" 
were simply diagrams of the lands, on separate sheets, torn 
and fraj^ed, by frequent handling, by means of which, at that 

*Rec. of Southold, Vol. i, p. 324. 
tSouthold Rec, Vol. i. pp. 324-5. 
tSoutholds' Celebration, p. 175. 



16 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

« 

early period, tliey kept track of their holdings. A primitive 
way, but the owners were careless and negligent. The con- 
tents of the supposed lost book, as given by Mr. Case, would 
be an utter impossibility. The great dividends of Corchaug. 
Mattatuck, Occabaug, Oyster Ponds, and a large portion of 
Southold itself, liad not been laid out at that period. They 
were still common lands and undivided according to the first 
order in Liber B, which begins Oct. 9, 1654. The ''page 
after page of drafts, allotments, Indian deeds, orders, munici- 
pal regulations, etc., etc.," never had any existence, except 
in iMr. Case's own vivid imagination. A community of 
whom only nine, during a space of nearly four years from 
1651 to 1655 (had already) recorded their lands, and the re- 
mainder obliged under penalty to do the same, would not be 
likely to have any earlier records. Even the orders in Liber 
B are desultory, without any regularity and at wide inter- 
vals. *The previous orders governing the settlement, were 
what the New Haven colony sent there through Mr. Good- 
year, which were accepted without question, without town 
meetings, or regulations of their own. That they had dia- 
grams of their lands there is no question, but as far as writ- 
ten records went, they had none. Not owning the land 
prior to 1649, there was no incentive towards keeping books 
of record. Here is where they differed entirely from their 
Southampton neighbors, who owned their lands from the 
very beginning, and were beholden to none. 

Therefore it will be seen by those who are prepared to ac- 
cept the visible recorded evidences, and who study the sub- 
ject carefully from the standpoint of facts, that all the infor- 
mation we have in its relationship to each other, is totally 
antagonistic to every claim of the Southold historians. I 
am no inconoclast, and do not desire to destroy the antiqua- 
ted relics of tradition, if truthful, and can be proven so by 
comparison. But tradition is such a vague, indefinite, un- 
substantial and visionary element of history, that no one 
ought to accept it fully in this year of light. Having been 
aware for some years, on how frail a foundation Southold's 
claims were resting, and finding that her historians still 
claimed its priority in every way in their power, has im- 
pelled me to give the facts as they really exist, from the 
standpoint of visible contemporary records, and not from the 
illusions of later history. Vincit omnia Veritas. 

*N. H. Rec, Vol. i, p. 97. 



The Descendants of John Holmes of Jefferson, 
New Hampshire, and his wife, Polly GoodalL 



CONTRIBUTED BY DR. L. E. HOLMES. 




OHN HOLMES, of Jefferson, Coos County, New 
Hampshire, was born, probably, in Portsmouth, N. H.i 
though possibly in Kent, England, about 1740-50. 
George Holmes^, (NathanieP, John\) now living at 
Stoughton, Mass., b. 1823, aged 68, says : "I remember see- 
ing my grandfather tottering about the barn-yard with a red- 
handled hoe in his hands ; I remember going to his funeral 
led by the hand by my father. I must have been about six 
or eight years old ; my grandfather was very old." He died 
then about 1830 ; estimating his age at 80-5, we arrive at 
the probable date of his birth. He married about 1765-70, 
Polly Goodall. Mrs. Emeline Plaisted, of Jefferson, N. H. 
grand-daughter of Polly^ (^Holmes') Whittum, in a letter, 
dated Feb. 7, 1891, writes: ''John Holmes' wife's name was 
Polly Goodall. Mrs. Hitty Mclntyre, the oldest person in 
town, told me that her daughter Polly was named after her." 
She adds : "She came with him from Portsmouth." Mrs. 
Mary Ann^ (^Holmes) Balch, (Nathaniel^) in a letter dated 
Williamsfield, Illinois, June 20, 1891, writes : "My grand- 
father's name was John, I believe. Grandfather Holmes 

married ■ — Goodale. I don't think he had any brothers. 

I have heard Portsmouth was his native place. My grand- 
father was a Methodist; he had a Methodist hymn-book 
which I remember. His children were Polly, Eleanor, 



18 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

George, Hannah, James and Nathaniel. There was a John 
a!i(l Samuel." 

Tradition from as early at least as the second generation, 
says : Our ancestor was one of three brothers, (whose names 
are faintly remembered as George, John and Samuel,) who 
came to this country from Kent, England, in a sailing vessf 1, 
(the "Paul Jones" ?) and landed at Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire. 

William Ingerson, who came with John Holmes "from the 
Navy Yard" to Jefferson in 1796, came to this country in a 
sailing vessel, the "Paul Jones," shortly before the settle- 
ment in Jefferson. Col. Joseph Whipple came to this coun- 
try (perhaps not his first voyage) about the same time. A 
story is told by the old inhabitants to-day at Jefferson, that 
Col. Whipple came to Jefferson from Portsmouth, soon after 
his arrival from England ; that he was followed from the 
latter country, probably on another vessel, by a woman, who, 
on arriving at Portsmouth, found that he (Whipple) had 
gone to Jefferson, and immediately followed him to that 
place, traveling on foot. On her arrival at Jefferson she 
found that Whipple had returned to Portsmouth, and at once 
started, again on foot, to overtake him ; she was lost in the 
woods, and perished, her body being afterwards discovered. 
Col. Whipple, who owned the town site at Jefferson, sold 
lots to men whom he brought from Portsmouth and from 
England. 

My grandmother's story was that John Holmes and his 
two brothers came in a sailing vessel with Joseph Whipple, 
from Kent, England. 

John Holmes may have come from England, landing at 
the "Navy Yard" at Portsmouth about this time, with his 
wife and companions, or he may have been born in Ports- 
mouth ; we have not as yet been able to determine his birth- 
place. A transcript from Coos County Records says : "John 
Holmes, William Ingerson, Samuel Hart and John Marden, 
with their families, moved from the Navy Yard at Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, (Kittery, Maine,) to Jefferson, in 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 19 

the fall of 1797. They all lived together in one small log 
house during the winter, and settled on four contiguous lots, 
which were as good ones as were in the town. Nov. 2, 1797, 
lots No. 9, range 7, 100 acres, were deeded to John Hohnes, 
one half being given him, and paid ten pounds for the other 
half. In 1798, John, George and Lazarus Holmes paid taxes 
in the town of Jefferson." Mrs. Mary Jane^ (^Holmes) 
Plaisted, (James^, John\) says that she has heard her mother 
say that Lazarus Holmes was no relation to John. 

I find in New Hampshire Town Papers: John Holmes, 
John Marden, Samuel Hart, and Samuel Holmes petitioned 
the Senate and House of Representatives from Town of Dart- 
mouth, Co. Grafton, 1793, for an Act of Incorporation. (Jef- 
ferson was first called Dartmouth in 1765.) This petition 
was not granted, but a grant was made to Samuel Hart and 
Col. Joseph Whipple in 1796. 

A family tradition says John Holmes was impressed by 
the British, deserted and hid at "Pond Safety" — a name given 
to the pond in the vicinity of Jefferson by the deserters, which 
name the pond retains at this time—; that he afterwards en- 
listed in the Continental Army. N. H. Town Records say 
Lazarus Holmes, Rider and Hight deserted to Pond Safety. 
Probably John Holmes was with them there. A copy from 
the New Hampshire Records, signed by A. S. Ay ling. Adju- 
tant General, dated May 29, 1891, says : "A list of recruits 
made June 20, 1781, reports John Holmes, age 17, height 
5-5, davk, enlisted April 17, 1781, for three years, residence 
Barrington, member 5 Co., rank private." This description 
as to height and complexion corresponds with the Jefferson 
Holmes type; but the age makes it look doubtful for our 
ancestor. If that were his age, he would have been but 17 
at the birth of his son George, of whose age we are certain, 
and there are supposed to have been two or three children 
prior to the birth of George. (I think I heard my grand- 
mother say that George was the oldest child.) The place, 
Barrington, makes it still more^doubtful. 

The exact date that John Holmes moved to Jefferson, or 



20 ISIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

first lived tliere with his family is still a matter of doubt, 

notwithstanding the plain statement of the County Records, 

above quoted. We find him with others petitioning the 

Legislature in 1793, and it must have been some ten or more 

years earlier that he was in hiding at Pond Safety with 

others; it also appears that their families lived somewhere 

near, as it is said "they were furnished food by their families." 

Mrs. Mary Jane Plaisted, already quoted, says her aunt 

Hannah, probably the fifth child of John Holmes, "was the 

first white child born in Jefferson." She must have been 

born about 1781, and this tradition is repeated by others of 

the third generation. But after this time the family must 

have removed to Portsmouth, as Mrs. Almira^ {Holmes) 

Chenery, (NathanieP, John^) now living at Lowell, Mass., 

says she has heard her father tell of his journey-the family 

journey-from Portsmouth to Jefferson, and he was born in 

1784. This journey which he remembered must have been 

at the time the family moved to Jefferson from the Navy 
Yard in 1797. 

The old homestead built on lot 9, range 7, is no more. But 
a year or two ago, (1889 or 1890) it was removed, and the 
Warmbek Cottage — a summer hotel — now rests upon the site. 
In June, 1891, I visited Jefferson for the purpose of finding 
dates for this record. I visited the old graveyard where the 
the first settlers were buried. At the earliest graves plain 
(rough) granite slabs stood at the head, and smaller ones at 
the foot of the graves, but no mark of a chisel had ever been 
made on these slabs, and the buried rest in their unkept 
graves as silently now, — though I would have made them 
speak — as rest the "Unknown Dead." Some of the second 
generation of Holmeses have been removed to a new burial 
ground, where the chiseled stone leaves them less silent. 
The old burial ground is overgrown with wild cherry trees, 
and lies at the upper end of a field, next east or northeast 
from the Warmbek Cottage. 

It is strange that no trace can be discovered of so active a 
man as John Holmes of Jefferson, and always associated with 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 21 

the same active companions, connecting liim with his ances- 
try, if he had American ancestry. The town records of 
Portsmouth, N. H., and Kittery, Maine, have been searched 
in vain. However, some clue may yet be found connecting 
him with an ancestry in this country. At present the strong- 
est indications seem to be that he came from Kent, England, 
not many years before he moved to Jefterson. Hitty Mcln- 
tire, authority already quoted, says John Holmes' wife, Polly 
(Goodall, or Goodale,) died many years before her husband. 
Probably she died about 1810. The Samuel mentioned by 
Mary Ann^ (^Holmes) Baloh is not remembered by others, but 
a memory comes to me of hearing niy grandmother speak to 
my father about ''poor Samuel's death" as if it was brought 
about by a lingering illness, accident, or catastrophe. John 
and Polly Holmes had: 

I. Samuel,^ b. about 1772, d. about 1800. 
John,2 b. about 1774. 
Eleanor^, b. about 1776. 
George^, b. Sept. 5, 1777. 
Polly2, b. about 1779-80. 
Hannali^, b. about 1781 ; m. James Rider, of 

Jefferson, and died there. 
James^ b. January, 1783. 
Nathaniel^ b. October 10, 1784. 

2. John Holmes^, (John^) of Jefferson, N. H., farmer, b. 
about 1774; m. Christian Higlit, about 1815. They had: 

8. I. Ezra Pole^, b. 1815. 

9. II. Martha^, b. about 1817. 

III. Two sons, names not known. They were 
given by their father to a Mr. Browu, who 
went West with them when they were six 
or eight j^ears old. 

3. Eleanor Holmes^, (John\) b. about 1776 ; m. John 
Ingerson of Jefferson, N. H., about 1792. They had : 

I. Jesse Ingei'son^, b. about 1793 ; m. Hitty 
Wilson. Tliey had Louisa, William, Jesse, 



2. 


II. 


8. 


III. 


4. 


IV. 


5. 


V. 


• 


VI. 


6. 


VII. 


7. 


vni. 



99 



MAGAZrNK OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Hester, George, Hiram and Luthera In- 
ge rson. 
n. Hester Ingerson^ b. about 1795, m John 
Buzzell. They hadJohn, Hester and Car- 
olme Buzzell. 

in. Polly Ingerson-^, b. about 1797, d. age 18 
years. 

IV. Eleanor Ingerson^, b. Feb. 22, 1799; m. 
Joshua Plaisted of Jefferson, May 2, 1822. 
They had : Harriet, Lydia Ann, Hubbard, 
Hawkins, Rubin, Jacob Stickney, and Mar- 
garet Plaisted. 
V. William Ingerson^, d. age 7 years. 

VI. John Ingerson^, d. age 21 years. 
VII. Dorothea Ingerson^, b. 1806, m. Moses 
Woodward. They had : Hazen, Laura, 
George, Hubbard, Dexter, Howard and 
Harriet Woodward. 
VIII. Betsey Ingerson^, m. Hawkins Plaisted. 
They had: Charles, Dorcas Ann, Philip, 
Nelson, Elizabeth, Martha and Norvillo 
Plaisted. 

IX. Lydia Ingerson^, b. August 29, 1814, m. 
Oct. 27, 1825, Elisha Plaisted. They had : 
William, Edwin, Elisha and Nelson Plais- 
ted. She d. April 28, 1838. Their son, 
Edwin Plaisted, m. Mary Jane^ Holmes, 
( James^, John^) . 

4. George Holmes^ (John\) of Shapleigh, Maine, b. 
Sept. 5, 1777, m. 1799, Mary Maxcy, probably of Bethlehem, 
N. H., b. Sept. 12, 1782, d. Dec. 23, 1864, at Bridgton, Me. 
He d. June 28, 1823, at Shapleigh. George Holmes moved 
from Jefferson to Shapleigh with his family but a short time 
before his death. In the early years of his married life he 
was engaged in preaching throughout the settlements of New 
England, traveling on horseback from place to place. This 
life did not please his young wife, who persuaded him to set- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 23 

tie on a farm at Shapleigh. He was educated mostly at the 
"Pine Knot" school room, with his father as a teacher, who, 
being one of the earnest Methodists of that day, trained him 
for the Methodist ministry. Whether he was ever ordained 
is not known. Mary Maxcy, his wife, was half sister to 
David Martin of Lawrence, Mass., Nathaniel, John and 
Jonathan Martin of Bridgton, Me. After the death of her 
husband she went with a portion of her children to live with 
her half brothers at Bridgton. They were the only relatives 
she had in her bereavement from whom to ask help or sym- 
pathy. Her two oldest boys were left at work on farms in 
Shapleigh. She lived a short time with her brother Na- 
thaniel, until her boys got employment near by in stores, on 
farms, and at trades, and were able to help in the support of 
their mother. They had : 

10. I. George^, b. April 1, 1800. 

11. H. Olivet b. July 28, 1803. 

12. HI. Stewart Wilcox^, b. May 26, 1806. 

13. IV. Levi Willard^, b. Feb. 5, 1810. 

V. NahumS, b. May 21, 1817, d. Nov. 22, 1833. 

5. Polly Holmes^, (Johni,) b. about 1779-80; m. 
Thomas Whittum, about 1799, and lived at Jefferson. They 
had: 

L Merribal Whittum^; m. Jacob Staples, and 
d. at Jefferson, quite old. 
H. Lucy Whittum^, b. 1801 ; m. Hev. H. Win- 
chester. She d. Oct., 1888. They had 3 
sons and 2 daughters. 
in. Polly Whittum^; m. Jesse Bumpus. She d. 

1875. They had eight children. 
IV. Hannah Whittum^; m. James Hill. They 
had seven children. 
V. Dorsia Whittum^- m. Edward F. Hunt. 
She d. 1873. 
VI. Richard Whittum-^ b. 1808, d. 1875 ; m. Jane 
Stillings, who was living, 1891. They had 



24 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

sons, Fred, Elva, George and Frank W hit- 
turn ; and daughters, Mary Jane, Emeline, 
who m. Elisha Plaisted ; Elizabeth, who m. 

• Crawford ; and Sophronia, who m. 

— ^ Brown. 

6. James Holmes^, ( John^,) of Jefferson, N. H., farmer, 
b. January, 1783 ; m. 1802, Olive Garland. He d. 1846. 
She was not living 1891. Their daughter, Mary Jane, in a 
letter of Feb. 2, 1891, wrote : "My father, and my uncle 
Nathaniel were plain unostentatious farmers. There was 
nothing of unusual note to mark their lives. They were 
kind and hospitable to all that came to their doors. While 
not church members, they were very strict and puritanical in 
their observation of the Sabbath. Our playthings were all 
put aside Saturday night, and woe be to one that transgressed. 
My father received his education at Fryeburg Academy, 
Maine." They had : 

I. Hannah^, d. infant. 
Bethia^, d. infant. 
Stephen^, b. 1806. 
Bethias, b. 1810. 
Olive^. 

Persis^, b. about 1813; m. Stewart Wilcox 

Holmes, her cousin. 
Betsey^. 
Fannie^. 

Elvira^, b. 1823. 
AbigaF, b. 1825. 
Mary Jane^ b. Aug. 5, 1827. 
Hannah^, b. 1829, d. 1846, in Lowell, Mass. 

7. Nathaniel Holmes^, (John^,) of Jefferson, New 
Hampshire, b. Oct. 10, 1784, farmer; m. about 1805, Polly 
Drew, b. April 4, 1787, d. Dec. 18, 1877. He d. Sept. 21, 
1858. They had: 

18. I. John Rider3, b. May 24, 1806. 

19. II. Hubbard^, b. May 10, 1809. 





11. 


14. 


HI. 


15. 


IV. 




V. 




VI. 




VII. 




VIII. 


16. 


IX. 




X. 


17. 


XI. 




XII. 



21. 


V. 


22. 


VI. 


23. 


VII. 


24. 


VIII. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 25 

20. TIL Mary Ann^, b. Jan. 20, 1814. 

IV. Charity^ b. Jan. 18, 1816 ; m. Joshua Hainb- 
let, 1851, in Lowell, Mass. She d. Jan. 
21, 1891. He was b. 1817, and in 1891, 
was living in Knox, Illinois. 
Charles^, b. Jan- 17, 1820. 
George^, b. April 27, 1823. 
Laura^, b. Oct. 20, 1825. 
Almira3, b. June 15, 1828. 

8, Ezra Pole Holmes^ (John^, John\) b. about 1815; 
m. April 1, 1840, Sylphia Dyre. They had: 

I. Eroma*, b. about 1841; m. Varnum, of 

Lowell, Mass. 

9. Martha Holmes^, (John^, John\) b. about 1817, in 
Jefferson, N. II., m. about 1835, Batchelder. They had: 

I. Emeline Batchelder*, who m. Stevens, 

They had a daughter who m. Irving Smith, 
and had four children. 

10. George Holmes-^ (George^, John\) of Jefferson, 

New Hampshire, b. April 1, 1800; m. 1829, Mary Warren, 

daughter of John, of South Berwick, Maine He d. Aug. 

1833, at South Berwick. She was b. 1786, d. May 18, 1861. 

They had : 

I. Clara*, b. July 28, 1830, m. Nov. 17, 1853, 

Henry Philpots,b. 1828. She m. (2) July 

30, 1867, Alonzo Spaulding, b. April 17, 

1839. He enlisted in the 3rd. N. H. Inf 

in 1861, and served four years. In 1891 

they were living at South Berwick, Me. 

25. H. JoluA b. May 15, 1831. 

26. III. George* W. b. April 9, 1834. 

11. Olive Holmes^ (George^ John\) of Jefferson, N. 
H., and Bridgton, Maine, b- July 28, 1803; m. 1828, Samuel 
Davis of Bridgton, farmer, son of Samuel L. Davis of Lunen- 
burg, Mass. She d. June 19, 1875. He was b. July 4, 1798 
d. March 5, 1884. They had : 



26 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HTSTORY. 

I. Leander Davis^ b. March 14, 1829 ; m. Ellen 

Kelley, of Portland, Me., 1855. 
II. George Henry^ Davis, b. Jan. 3, 1831, d. 1837. 

III. Olive Marantha Davis^, b. Sept. 26, 1832; d. 

Nov. 25, 1851. 

IV. Samuel Alonzo Davis^, b. Jan. 13, 18^5, d. 

1837. 
V. Samuel Alonzo Davis^ b. Sept, 7, 1837 ; m. 
Ellen Cushman of Boston, Mass. He is a 
physician, living at Charlestown, Mass., 
1891. 
VI. George Henry Davis*, b. Nov. 21, 1839. He 
is a farmer, unmarried, living on the old 
place at Bridgton, 1891. 
VII. Louisa Davis^ b. Nov. 5, 1841, d. Sept. 10, 
1857. 
VIII. Nathan Davis*, b. Nov. 2, 1844 ; m. Belle 
Dalton of Somerville, Mass. He is a phy- 
sician, living at Somerville, 1891. 

12. Stewart Wilcox Holmes^ (George^, John\) of 
Jefferson, N. H., and Bridgton, Me., carpenter, b. May 26, 
1806; m. Nov. 18, 1835, Persis Holmes^, his cousin, who was 
b. about 1812, and d. 1837. He m. (2) June 7, 1840, Betsey 
(^Dodge) Wiswold, b. July 4, 1817, living at Fitchburg, 
Mass., 1891. He d. at Fitchburg,. March, 1888. He had by 
his first wife : 

27.- I. Frances vVnn*, b. Oct. 13, 1836. 

By second wife : 

Persis*; b. Jan. 16, 1841, d. Feb. 1, 1864. 
Angelina*, b. June 20, 1843,d. Feb. 26, L844. 
Nahum Morrill*, b. Nov. 7, 1844, d. April 

18, 1864. 
Perley*, b. June 26, 1848. 
Woodbury*, b. March 15, 1850. 
Stewart*, b. Dec. 22, 1851, d. Sept. 12, 1876. 
Eugene Everqtt*; b. Oct. 18, 185.4. 





II. 




III. 




IV. 


28. 


V. 


29. 


VI. 




VII. 


30. 


VIII. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 27 

IX. Fred Alton*, b. Nov. 3, 1857. 
X. Flora Elva*, b. Aug. 3, 1860, d. April 9, 1862. 

13. Levi Willard Holmes^, (George^, Jolm\) of 
Bridgton, Maine, b. at Jefferson, New Hampshire, Feb. 5, 
1810, d. at Bridgton, June 8, 1872. He m. Jan. 24, 1838, 
Sarah Dennett, b. Jan. 24, 1821, living at Bridgton, 1891. 
(She was daughter of Joshua Dennett of Bridgton, trader, 
who was b. April 28, 1785, d. Oct. 18, 1855 ; m. Betsey Har- 
mon, about 1808. He was son of Nicholas Dennett of Saco, 
Me., who m. Susan Phebe Fabyon, June 20, 1845. Nicholas 
Dennett d. Sept. 4, 1814. His ninth child was Joshua, and 
Joshua's sixth child was Sarah Dennett who m. Levi Willard 
Holmes of Bridgton.) Levi Willard Holmes found a situa- 
tion in a dry goods and grocery store, owned by Samuel 
Andrews at Bridgton, soon after his mother moved there fol- 
lowing the death of her husband. He wished to follow the 
early calling of his father, and to prepare himself for the 
ministry ; he studied hard at night by the light of a pitch 
pine knot, and acquired what was then called a liberal educa- 
tion; but the support of his mother prevented him from per- 
suing his studies to the conclusion. He became however an 
eloquent and earnest leader in religious meetings, and the 
younger people of his time remark to-day on his power in 
prayer. He never joined any religious denomination, failing 
to find any satisfactory creed, unless, as it is said, in his 
latter years he joined a Christian' Church being organized in 
his locality. He followed the occupation of a farmer and 
house carpenter combined, alternating in the employment of 
each. They had: 

Elizabeth Ann^, b. Feb. 10, 1839. 

Levi Edwin*, b. April 29, 1841. (Author of 

these notes.) 
George VVashingtonS b. Oct. 19, 1843. 
Henrietta Huldah^ b. Feb. 27, 1846. 
Gardner Dennett^ b. Dec. 18, 1848. 
Albert Harmon*, b. Dec. 14, 1851. 
Alvin Dennett*, b. Jan. 13, 1856. 



31. 


I. 


32. 


IL 


33. 


in. 


34. 


IV. 


35. 


V. 


36. 


VI. 


37. 


VII. 



28 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

14. Stephen Holmes^, (James^, John^) of Jefferson, 
N. H., and of New York City, b. at Jefferson, 1806, d. in 
New York City, some time between 1849 and 1851 ; married 
Nancy Putnam in 1836, who was b. 1810, d. August 8, 1865. 
(She was a direct descendant of General Israel Putnam, of 
Revolutionary fame, "76". Her sister, Phebe Putnam, was 
living at the age of 75 years, in 1890.) Stephen Holmes 
was originally a farmer, but for some years before his death 
was connected with the police department in New York. 
They had : 

38. I. Persist, b. May 18, 1837. 
II. Clara*, d. in infancy. 

III. George Arthur*, d. in infancy. 

IV. Phebe Ann*, b. 1839, m. William Martin in 

1857. He was son ,of Captain Martin, of 
Lowell, Mass. She d. Aug. 8, 1861. 

39. V. Royal Joslin*, b. Oct. 19, 1845. 
VI. Sarah*, b. 1848, d. 1849. 

15. Bbthia Holmes^, (James^, John^) b. 1810, d. July 
15, 1850, m. 1830, Erastus Woodward, son of Luke, of Jef- 
ferson, N. H. Erastus Woodward, b. 1810, d. 1842. They 
had : 

I. Emeline Woodward*, b. 1884, d. 1835. 

II. Erastus Woodward*, b. 1836, d. 1836. 

III. Mason Woodward*. 

IV. Erastus Woodward*, b. July 11, 1838 ; living 
/ at Somerville, Mass., 1891. 

V. Lester Woodward*, b. 1840. 
VI. John Woodward*, b. 1842. 

16. Elvira Holmes^, (James^, Johni,) b. 1823, d. 1878, 
m. Stephen Leavitt, who was living at North Chelmsford, 
Mass., in 1891. They had : 

I. Edwin Leavitt*, b. 1850. 

IL Charles Leavitt*, b. 1857. 

III. Herbert Leavitt*, b. 1859, 

IV. Frank Leavitt*, b. 1861, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 29 

17. Mary Jane Holmes^, (James^, John^,) b. Aug. 5, 
1827, m. May 21, 1848, William Edwin Plaistecl, son of 
Elislia of Jefferson, N. H. W. E. Plaisted d. in Fitchburg, 
Mass. She was living at Worcester, Mass., 1891. (Elisha 
Plaisted of Jefferson, m. Emeline Whittum, granddaughter 
of Polly {Holmes') Whittum, daughter of John Holmes^ of 
Jefferson.) They had: 

I. Ella Jane Plaisted^, b. June 24, 1849, died 

infant. 
II. Arthur PlaistedS b. Mch. 28, 1854,d. infant. 
III. Hattie Burnap Plaisted^ b. June 26, 1858, 
m. July 1, 1875, Everett James Bard well ; 
living at Worcester, Mass., 1891. 

18. John Rider Holmes^ (NathanieP, John i,) of Jef- 
ferson, N. H., farmer, b. Nov. 16, 1806, m. Jan. 25, 1829, 
Betsey Drew of Jefferson. He d. July 25, 1838. She was 
b. July 6, 1811, and is living, 1891. They had : 

40. . I. Erasmus^, b. Feb. 11, 1831. 

41. II. Eliza Jane*, b. Feb. 5, 1835. 

III. John Orin*, b. September 5, 1836. He went 

south in 1858, to Forsyth, Monroe Co., 
Ga. Was heard from until 1861 ; never 
afterwards. 

IV. Persis Ann^ b. July 4, 1838. Living in 

Tyngsborough, Mass., 1891. 

19. Hubbard Holmes^ (NathanieP, John\) of Jeffer- 
son, N. H., farmer, b. May 10, 1809, d. Dec. 27, 1869; m. 

1834 Charity Jordan, b. May 4, 1810, living at Jefferson, 
1891. They had: 

Warren William*, b. April 10, 1885. 
Emeline*, b. June 8, 1840, d. Dec. 24, 1869. 
Arianna*, b. June 22, 1844. d. Aug. 9, 1887. 
Guy*, b. Oct. 31, 1849. 
Ekiora*, b. June 24, 1852, d. Feb. 15, 1870. 

•20. Mary Ann Holmes^ (Nathaniel^, John\) b. Jan. 20, 
1814, at Jefferson, N. H., m. December 9, 1840, Samuel 



42. 


I. 


43. 


II. 




III. 


44. 


IV. 




V. 



I 



30 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Balcli. In 1891 she was living with Mrs. Hurd of Truro, 
Illinois. Samuel Balch was b. 1816, d. July 22, 1890, in 
California. They had : 

1. Emeline BalcM b. October 23, 1841, m. 
Carm M. Searles in 1856. Living in Hol- 
lister, California, 1891. 
II. Jane Balch*, b. June 15, 1847, m. Alfred S. 

Hard of Truro, 111. | 

III. Harvey Balch*, b. Dec. 24, 1849. 

IV. Adaline Balch*, b. February 17, 1852, m. 

1873, Frank Balden. 
V. Edgar Balch*, died young. 

21. Charles Holmes^, (NathaiueP, Jolmi,) of Jeffer- 
son, N. H., farmer, b. January 17, 1820, m. March 23, 1844, 
Clarissa Stillings, born April 11, 1820, died April 11, 1863. 
He married (2) January 24, 1864, Susan Davis, who was 
living at Jefferson, 1891. He died 1875. He had by first 
wife : 

45. I, Ellen Amanda*, b. May 28, 1845. 
II. Josephine Millentha*, b. Jan. 5, 1847, m. 

June 18, 1870, Albert Lang Martin, son 
of Sylvester of Jefferson Highlands. He 
was b. June 18, 1848. They are liv- 
ing at Jefferson Highlands, N. H., 1891. 

IIL Clara*, b. Feb. 1, 1850, d. Jan. 31, 1887. 

IV. Albion*, b. Dec. 12, 1852. 

46. V. Fred*, b. May 8, 1856. 
He had by second wife : 

VI. Walter Channing*, b. Dec. 6, 1866. 

47. VII. Edith Hopie*, b. Nov. 12, 1867. 
VIII. Wyth Coleridge*, b. April 22, 1870. 

IX. Mary Jane*, b. Nov. 4, 1872. 

22. George Holmes^, (NathanieP, John^,) born April 
27, 1823, at Jefferson, N. H., married Jan. 1, 1846, Elizabeth 
Bedell, daughter of Bev. Abraham Bedell, Baptist minister ; 
she b. November 4, 1822. George Holmes had a liberal 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 31 

education, and was a farmer until 1863. He lived at Gor- 
ham, N. H., Bethel, Me., at Lancaster, N. H., and Auburn, 
Me. In 1863 he enlisted in the First Maine Battery, and 
was in service until discharged in 1864, since which time he 
has been a confirmed invalid. They were living at Stough- 
ton, Mass., in 1891. They had: 

I. George Edwin*, b. Oct. 10, 1846, died Dec. 
17, 1864, at Bethel, Me. He served in 
the First Mass. Cavalry during the war of 
the Rebellion. 
n. Minnie Almira*, b. Oct. 10, 1849, in Lancas- 
ter, N. H., died Oct. 12, 1875, at Auburn, 
Me. 

48. HI. William EddyS b. Oct. 18, 1850. 

49. IV. Alfred Clarence*, born July 10, 1852, at 

Jefferson, N.. H. 
V. Frank Leroy*, b. July 15, 1854, at Jefferson, 
N. H., m. August, 1881, Sadie Murray of 
Shapleigh, Me., born 1864. Living at 
Stoughton, 1891. 
VI. Lizzie Maud*, b. January 17, 1858, at Gor- 
ham, N. H., d. October 15, 1877, at Au- 
burn, Me. 

50. VII. Carrie Elvira*, born June 26, 1861, at Gor- 

ham, N. H. 
VIII. Ella Eva Lillian*, born June 8, 1864, at 
Lynn, Mass., m. May 9, 1885, Ruben W. 
Hodgekins, son of Ruben of Auburn, Me. 
He was b. 1863, and living at 7 James 
street, Lynn, Mass., 1891. 

23. Laura Holmes^, (NathanieP, John\) b. Oct. 20, 
1825, at Jefferson, N. H., m. Wm. F. Smith, Dec. 21, 1841. 
He was b. July 13, 1820, and in 1891, they were living at 
Lancaster, New Hampshire. They had: 

I. Austin Smith*, b. Dec. 9, 1843, m. Celia 
Pattle, and had six children. 



32 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

ir. Irvin Smith*, b. March 7, 1848. He m. a 
Stevens, whose mother, Emeline Batchel- 
der, was daughter of Martha Holmes, 
granddaughter of John Holmes^. They 
had four children. 

HI. Mary Smith*, b. July 10, 1854; m. Neal 
Johnson, and had two children. She d. at 
Lynn, Mass., Jan. 6, 1891. 

IV. Burt Smith*, b. Nov. 26, 1862. 

24. Almira Holmes^, (NathanieP, John^,) b. June 15, 
1828, at Jefferson, N. H., m. May 12, 1850, Loren William 
Chenery of Lowell, Mass. He was b. at Livermore, Me., 
Dec. 17, 1819, d. March 19,1878. She was living at Lowell, 
1891. They had : 

I. Albion Elden Chenery*, b. Dec. 31, 1852, d. 
April 14, 1876. 
n. Delia Chenery*, b. May 18, 1866, d. Sept. 9, 
1883. 

25. John Holmes*, (George^ George^, John^,) of South 
Berwick, Maine, b. May 14, 1831, m. 1856, Nancy Hyde of 
Biddeford, Me. She was born in Manchester, Eng., d. at 
Augusta, Me. He enlisted in the 9th Mass. Inf. Co. H., on 
the 13 day of July, 1863, for the period of 3 years; was 
transferred to the 32d Mass. June 10, 1864. He d. in the 
service, some time between June 1864 and 1865. They had: 

51. I. George Monroe^ b. March 3, 1857. 

26. George W. Holmes*, (George^, George^, John^) of 
Great Falls, N. H., b. at South Berwick, Maine, April 9, 
1834; m. 1854, Lydia Hoyt, dau. Joseph, of New Market, N. 
H. She d. at Great Falls, Jan. 22, 18^8. He was a spinner. 
He enlisted in the 7th N. H. Inf. in 1862, was Corporal in 
Co. D., was taken prisoner, and d. in prison, of wounds, Oct. 
24,1864. They had: 

52. I. Ella Jane^, b. Oct. 1855. 

53. LL Charles Edwiil^ b. May 17, 1857. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 33 

27. Frances Ann HolmesS (Stewart W.^, George^, 
John\) of Townsend, Mass., b. Oct. 13, 1836; m. June 23, 
1859, David Alfred Gil more of Fitcliburg, Mass. Living at 
Townsend, 1891. They had : 

I. Cora GilmoreS, b. Sept. 3, 1860, d. Feb. 22, 
1863. 
II. Charles Edwin Gilmore^ b. May 21, 1868, d. 
April 21, 1869. 
III. Alice Pearl Gilmore^, b. June 21, 1871, m. 
July 12, 1890, Alden Frescott Gilchrist of 
Lunenburg, Mass., b. Mch. 19, 1871, 
farmer, living at Lunenburg, 1891. 
They had : 

I. Harry Stuart Gilchrist^, b. Aug. 30, 
1891. 

28. Perley HoLMES^ (Stewart W.^ George^, John^,) of 
Bridgton, Me., and Fitcliburg, Mass., grocer, b. June 26, 
1848; m. Sept. 10, 1867, Ella Sethena Cheney, of Fitchburg, 
b. April 3, 1850. They were living at Fitchburg 1891. 
They had : 

I. Herbert Cheney^ b. March 15, 1869. 
II. Grace Elizabeth'^, b. Dec. 25, 1870; Teacher 
public Schools, Fitchburg, Mass. 

III. Edwin PerleyS, b. Nov. 14, 1872. 

IV. Harry Eugene^ b. Oct. 5. 1878. 

29. Woodbury Holmes^ (Stewart W.^ George^, John\) 
of Bridgton, Me., and Asliby, Mass., farmer, b. March 15, 
1850; m. Eldora Allen of Fitchburg, Jan. 4, 1873. Liv- 
ing at Ashby, 1891. They had : 

I. George Woodbury^ b. Aug. 29, 1874. 

11. Charles Stewart^ b. Oct. 3, 1877. 

III. Alfred Alton^ b. Jan. 4, 1882. 

IV. Florence PearP, b. July 7, 1884. 
V. Lucy Eldora^ b. June 28, 1891. 

LO. Eugene Everett Holmes*, (Stewart W.^ George^, 
John^,) of Bridgton, Me., Fitchburg and Brattleboro, Mass., 



84 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

1). Oct. 18, 1854; m. March 19, 1874, Flora Gibbs. Living 
at Brattleboro, 1891. Thejhad; 

1. Isabella Laura^, b. Sept. 6, 1874. 
II. Perley Eugene^ b. April 22, 1877. 

31. Elizabeth Ann Holmes*, (Levi W^., George^ 
Jolini,) |3_ peb, 10, 1839, at Bridgton, Me., m. Nov. 27, 1859, 
Melville Cox Bacon, son of Marshall, of Bridgton, b. March 
19, 1839. He enlisted in the 12th Maine Infantry in 1861, 
was discliarged as corporal at close of the v^ar. Living at 
East Rochester, N. H., 1891. They had : 

I. Eddie Bacon^, b. April 30, 1861, d. August 

26, 1864. 
II. George Almanzo Bacon^ b. Feb. 15, 1866. 

32. Levi Edwin Holmes*, (Levi W.^, George^, John^,) 
of Butte City, Montana, b. in Bridgton, Maine. April 29, 
1841, m. Nov. 26, 1868, in John Day's Valley, Oregon, 
Sarah Hall, b. in England, July 15, 1846. (She was daugh- 
ter of John Hall of Dorsetshire, Eng., yeoman, who was son 
of Samuel Hall of Berkshire, Eng., yeoman.) Levi Edwin 
Holmes is a physician, in the practice of medicine at Butte 
City, Montana, 1891. 

Dr. Holmes was at North Bridgton Academy,Me., preparing 
for the entrance examination to Bowdoin College, when the 
war of the Rebellion began. He left the academy and went 
to Augusta, Me., where he enlisted as a private in Company 
I of the 15th Maine Infantry, Nov. 11, 1861. He served as 
a private nine days, as a Sergeant eighteen months, as Hos- 
pital Steward of his regiment five months, and as Second 
Lieut3nant,in the 96th U. S. Colored Infantry, fifteen months; 
whole term of service three years, three months and three 
days, at the expiration of which time he was honorably mug- 
tered out of service. After the war he resumed his studies, 
and was graduated in medicine at Bellevue Hospital Medi- 
cal College, New York city, in the spring of 1866. He again 
entered the military service, and was for two years an A. A. 
Surgeon in the U. S. Army, during which time he was sta- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 35 

tioned at Camp Logan, and at Fort Klamrth, Oregon, being 
married while stationed at Camp Logan, near which post his 
wife's family was living. He left the army and was in prac- 
tice in Canyon City, Oregon for a time, but soon after went 
to Montana, where he has been actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession for over twenty-one years. In Mon- 
tana he has been identified with the political issues of the 
Territory and State, in 1885, receiving the Republican nomi- 
nation for the office of Mayor of Butte City, to which office 
he was nearly elected in a strongly Democratic city. He 
held the rank of colonel of cavalry on the staff of the gov- 
ernor of Montana at one time. He is a Past Grand Master of 
his State Jurisdiction, in the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. Also a member of the American Medical Association, 
and for many years a member of the State Medical Society. 
He is a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, 
Commanderv of the State of California, and has been active- 
\j interested in the Grand Arni}^ of the Republic for many 
years, during which period he has held various positions in 
connection with the Montana Department, 

Some years ago he published a brief history of his branch 
of the Holmes Family, and he is the compiler of these records. 

They had : 

I. Lalia^ b. Dec. 31, 1869, in Canyon City, 

Oregon. Entered Wellesley College in 

the fall of 1888. Teacher of Mathematics, 

Montana University, 1890-L 

33. George Washington HolmesS (Levi W.^ George^, 

John^,) of North Conway, New Hampshire, b. in Bridgton, 

Me., Oct. 19, 1843; m. April 4, 1867, Sarah Pamelia Cook, 

daughter of George Washington Cook, of Parlee, Vermont. 

He died June 6, 1870. She was born July 11, 1845, and in 

1891 was living at Fernwood, Illinois. 

George W. Holmes entered the 5th Maine Infantry in the 
summer of 1861, and served through the war of the Rebel- 
lion. After the war he studied law in Washington, D. C, 
and later was g-raduated at the Commercial Colleore at Con- 



36 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

cord, N. H. He was admitted to the New Hampshire bar, 
and practiced his profession, and taught as principal of the 
Academy at North Conway, N. H., until the time of his 
deatli. He was intellectual in his tastes, ambitious and in- 
dustrious. He assumed the right in his later years, to 
change his "middle" name to Wliitton, (a fancy) which name 
he used in his signature. They had : 

I. George Byron^, b. Dec. 12, 1867, attorney at 
law, Chicago, 111. ; editor Fernwood News. 
n. Winton Everett^, b. Aug. 28, 1870. 

34. Henrietta Hulda HoLMES^ (Levi W.^, George^, 
John\) b. in Bridgton, Maine, Feb. 27, 1846 ; m. June 30, 
1872, Jolin Carrol Poland, son of John Calvin of Auburn, 
Me. He was b. May 6, 1847. They were living at West 
Roxbury, Mass., 1891. They had: 

I. Willard Norman Poland^, b. June 5, 1873. 
11. Etta Olive Poland^, b. August 1, 1876. 

III. Frederick Herbert Poland^ b. May 25, 1880, 

d. Aug. 25, 1880. 

IV. Bertha Edwina Poland'^ b. May 27, 1882. 
V. John Carrol Poland^ b. May 10, 1886. 

35. Gardner Dennett Holmes*, (Levi W.^ George^, 
John\) of York Village, Maine, b. in Bridgton, Me., Dec. 
18, 1848, m. March 2,^1875, Calista A. McDonald, b. Sept. 8, 
1854. He is a Methodist minister, living at York Village, 
1891. 

The Rev. Gardner D. Holmes, too young to enter the army 
during the war of the Rebellion, though ardently' patriotic, 
remained at home on the farm at Bridgton, and completed 
his education. He entered the ministry of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, in which he has since been engaged with 
eminent success. They had : 

I. Elbert Bradlee^ b'. Dec. 5, 1879. 
TI. Effie MabeP, b. April 14, 1882. 
III. Wilbert Daggett^ b. March 11, 1884, d. 
May 6, 1889. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 37 

36. Albert Harmon Holmes^ (I>evi W.^, George^, 
John^) of Brunswick, Maine, born in Bridgton, Me., Dec. 
14, 1851 ; m. May 4, 1881, Lydia Williams Stone, daughter 
of Col. A. J. Stone of Brunswick. A. H. Holmes was grad- 
uated at Bowdoin (college in the class of 1880 ; took the 
mathematical prize of three hundred dollars for his class. 
He studied law, and was admitted to the Cumberland bar at 
Portland, Me., in the spring of 1890. He received his de- 
gree of A. M. from his college in 1883. He was engaged in 
the practice of law at Brunswick, 1891. 

37. Alvin Dennett Holmes*, (Levi W.^, George 2^, 
John\) of Hyde Park, Mass., b. January 13, 1856, at Bridg- 
ton, Maine; m. Aug. 30, 1881, Mary Adelaide Stetson, dan. 
of William, of Brunswick, Me. She b. April 27, 1856. He 
was graduated at Bowdoin College in the class of 1880, and 
at Bowdoin Medical School in April, 1883. Engaged in the 
practice of medicine at Hyde Park, 1891. They had : 

I. Charmian Gertrude^ b. Oct. 16, 1884, died 

May 25, 1890. 
II. Brida May^ b. Oct. 2, 1885. 
HI. Vinnie Ckra% b. Dec. 13, 1889. 

38. Persts Holmes*, (Stephen^ James^, John^,) b. May 
18, 1837, m. Dec. 26, I860, George Millard Eliott of Lowell, 
Mass. She d. July 7, 1886, at Philadelphia, Pa. He born 
Nov. 1, 1839, and Avas living at Lowell, 1891. They had : 

I. Clara Eliott^ b. Aug. 4, 1862, m. June 4, 
1884, George B. Appleton of Boston, Mass. 
II. George Millard Elliott^ b. July 16, 1864. 

III. Annie Grace Elliott^, b. 1866, d. infant. 

IV. Mary Elliott^, b. 1«68, d. infant. 

V. Arthur Middleton Elliott^ b. Oct. 28, 1 876. 
VI. Edith Cushman Elliott^ b. Jan. 4, 1881, d. 
^ July 3, 1881. 

39. Royal Joslyn Holmes*, (Stephen-^ James^, John\) 
of Lowell, Mass., b. in Jefferson, N. H., Oct. 19, 1845 ; m. 
August 8, 1873, Laura S. Fox, daughter Samuel A., of Dra- 



88 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

cot, Mass. She b. Dec. 15, 1853. He was employed in the 
cotton mills at Lowell, 1891. They had: 

I. Flora Blanch^, b. Feb. 26, 1874. 

II. Mabel Laura^ b. Aug. 8, 1875. 

III. Walter Clarence^ b .June 4, 1877, d. Oct. 6, 

1877. 

IV. Ethel Persist, b. May 4, 1879. 

V. Edith SybeP, b. Dec. 1, 1880, d. May 21, 
1882. 

40. Erasmus HolmesS (JohnRider^, NathanieP, John\) 
born Feb. 11, 1831, m. Nov. 15, 1855, Hannah Jane Bancroft, 
born June 4, 1837. Living 1891 at Milford, N. H. He is 
living at Soldiers Home in Chelsea, Mass., 1891. He was a 
soldier in the early part of the war in a Massachusetts regi- 
ment. They had : 

64. I. Persis Jane^, b. Nov. 13, 1859. 

55. II. Sarah Lizzie^ b. -Jan. 2, 1862. 
HI. Ellen Annett^ b. Sept. 1, 1864. 

41. Eliza Jane Holmes^ (John R^., Nathaniel^ John\) 

born Feb. 5, 1835, m. June 11, 1863, Franklin W. Abbott, b. 

Aug. 23, 1837, d. Dec. 19, 1866. She d. April 24, 1890. 

They had : 

I. Fred Lincoln Abbott^ b. Oct. 27, 1865. 

42. Warren William Holmes^ (Hubbard^ Nathaniel^, 
John^,) of Jefferson, N. H., b. there April 10, 1835 ; m. Oct. 
5, 1857, Mary Ann Pressey, of Lowell, Mass., b. June 27, 
1834, d. May 13, 1875. He m. (2) Nov. 23, 1878, Sarah 
Grant, dau. of Hiram M., Lancaster, N. H., b. July 27, 1850. 
He was a farmer living at Jefferson, 1891. He had by first 
wife : 

56. I. Ida EldoraS, b. Aug. 27, 1858. 

43. Emeline HolmesS (Hubbard^ NathanieP, John^,) 
b. June 8, 1840, in Jefferson, N. H., m. 1860,Sastman Hardy. 
She d. Dec. 24, 1869. He b. about 1840, living in Boston, 
Mass., 1891. They had: 

I. Bert Woodbury Hardy^, b. 1863. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 39 

44. Guy Holmes*, (HubbarcF, NatlianieP, Johni,) of 
Jefferson, N. H., b. there Oct. 31, 1849; m. 1870, Plora 
Rogers, dau. James of Jefferson. She b. Jan. 21, 1853. 
Living at Jefferson, 1891. They had: 

I. Eldora Guy^, b. Jan. 1, 1871. 

45. Ellen Amanda Holmes^ > Charles^ Nathaniel^, 
John\) b at Jefferson, N. H., May 28, 1845 ; m. July 4, 
1856, Josiah Pinkham Davis, son of Jacob of Jefferson. He 
b. Aug. 12, 1842. Living at Jefferson Meadows, 1891. They 

It /I rl * 

I. Melville Harry Davis^, b. July 3, 1867. 
II. Gertrude Martha Davis^ b. Sept. 15, 1870, 
m. Sept. 28, 1889, Charles Earnest Clark. 

III. Arthur Llewellyn Davis^ b. March 29, 1872. 

IV. Lillian Josephine Davis^ b. March 5, 1874. 
V. Ellen Lena Davis^ b. Dec. 27, 1876. 

46. Fred Holmes*, (Charles^ Nathaniel^, John^,) b. at 
Jefferson, N. H., May 8, 1856, farmer, m. Nov. 21, 1882, 
Nettie Hicks, dau. of James of Jefferson. Living at Jeffer- 
son, 1891. 'J'hey had: 

I. James Edward'^ b. Dec. 8, 1883. 

47. Edith Hope Holmes^, (Charles^ Nathaniel^ John\) 
b. at Jefferson, N. H., Nov. 12, 1867; m. Dec. 14, 1886, 
James Applebee, son of Hiram, of Jefferson. He b. July 5, 
1860. Living at Island Pond, N. H., 1891. They had; 

I. Iva Viola Applebee'^ b. May 13, 1888. 

48. William Eddy Holmes^ (George^ Nathaniel^, 
John\) of Brockton, Mass., b. in Jefferson, N. H., Oct. 18, 
1850; m. Nov. 25, 1871, Kate Haskell, dau. of Isaac, of 
Auburn, Me. She b. 1843. He was in mercantile business 
at Brockton, 1891. They had: 

I. One child, d. young. 

49. Alfred Clarence Holmes,* (George^ Nathaniel^ 
John^,) of Boston, Mass., b. in Jefferson, N. H., July 10, 
1852; m. Jan. 1, 1872, Ella Greenlief, dau. of Andrew, of 
Norway, Me. She b. April 18, 1852, d. Nov. 1885, He m. 



40 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

(2) Nov. 11, 18'j0, Lizzie Gay, dan. of Edwin of Stoughton, 
Mass., b. Feb. 2, 1858. He was in mercantile business, and 
at one time lived in Brockton, Mass. Living in 1891, at 33 
East Newton St., Boston, Mass. He had by his first wife ; 
I. George Eddy^, b. Sept. 23, 1870. 
II. Earnest^ b. Nov. 2, 1871, d. young. 

III. Elgin Andrew^ b. Sept. 2, 1872. 

IV. Harry^, d. young. 

50. Carrie Elvira Holmes*, (George^, NathanieP, 

John^,) b. June 26, 1861, at Gorham, N. H., m. June 26, 

1883, William A. Field, son of William, of Auburn, Me. 

She d. Aug. 14, 1888, at Poland, Me. He b. June 26, 1858. 

They had : 

I. Walter Fields b. Feb. 1885. 

51. George Monroe Holmes^ (John*, George^ George^, 
John\) of South Berwick, Maine, and Boston, Mass., b. March 
3, 1857, cigar maker, m. Bridget Rogers of Watertown, Mass. 
They were living in Cambridge, Mass., in 1891 ; his address 
is 8 & 10 Cambridge St., Boston, They had : 

I. John HenryS, b. Feb. 28, 1890. 

52. Ella Jane Holmes^ (George*, George^, George^ 
John\) of South Berwick, Maine, b. Oct. 29, 1853 ; m. April 
7, 1872, Arthur A. Wiggin of Tuftonborough, b. April 20, 
1849, son of George of Tuftonborough, N. H. Living there 
in 1891. They had: 

- I. Minnie Ella Wiggin^ b. July 21, 1873. 
II. Gertrude May Wigging b. Sept. 5, 1879, d. 
1880. 
III. Lester Arthur Wiggin^, b. April 19, 1887. 

53. Charles Edwin Holmes^ ( George*, George^George^ 
John\) of South Berwick, Me., and Great Falls, N. H., b. 
May 17, 1857 ; m. May 17, 1881, Mabel Wentworth, dau. of 
Daniel of Berwick, Me. She was b.Aug. 2, 1861, in Lowell, 
Mass. He was a cigar maker living at Great Falls, N. H., 
1891. They had: 

I. Ralph Wentworth^, b. July 10, 1882. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY 41 

54. Persis Jane Holmes^, (Erasmus*, John R.^, Nathan- 
ieP, Johni,) b. Nov. 13,1859; m. June 28, 1886, Peter 
Golden, printer, b. Oct. 16, 1840. They are living at Hart- 
ford, Conn., 1891. They had: 

I. Dora Ellen Golden^, b. March 11, 1887. 
II. John Mitchel Golden^, b. March 23, 1888. 

55. Sarah Lizzie Holmes^ (Erasmus*, John R.^, Na- 
thaniel, Johni,) b. Jan. 2, 1862; m. Dec. 19, 1882, Arthur 
Ford, farmer, b. Sept. 2, 1861. They are living at Nashua, 
N. H., 1891. They had: 

I. Arthur James Ford^ b. Sept. 23, 1883. 
^ II. Jane Annett Ford^ b. March 9, 1887. 

56. Ida Eldora Holmes^ (Warren W.*, Hubbard^, 
Nathaniel^, John^,) of Jefferson, N. H., b. in Lowell, Mass , 
Aug. 27, 185^; m. July 1, 1880, William Gray James, son 
of Ephriam, of Jefferson. Living at Jefferson, 1891. They 

I. Wan-en William James^ b. March 28, 1884. 



These records are first published liere to bring to the eyes 
of all, any errors in names or dates that they may be cor- 
rected; any omission of dates of births or deaths, that they 
may be supplied; that any knowledge of our early ancestors 
that we may fail to find, ma}^ be supplied if possible, through 
others; or any 'item of famil}" history desirable — physical de- 
scription, as to height, com[)lection, or peculiarities, moral 
traits of character, habits, etc., may be sent to us for inser 
tion before publishing in book form. We would be glad to 
combine with any others of allied families (collateral branches) 
who have prepared or will prepare Genealogies of those fam- 
ilies, in publishing the same, as is often done, in the same 
volume with these records. It would add greatly to the in- 
terest of these records, and to the pleasure of possessing 
them, if engravings from photographs of all, or of many of 
the older generations could be placed in the volume. The 
children of the 2nd. and 3i-d. ofenerations mioht contribute 
to have this done. All who may be interested are respect- 
fully invited to correspond with the author of these notes, at 
Butte, Montana. 



An Interesting Pamphlet. 



^^,_ t^ HE pamphlet entitled "A Few Remarks upon some of 
^Af^r ^YiQ Votes and Resoliitioris of the Continental Con- 




gress," &c., was written by Harrison Gray, the Re- 
ceiver General or Treasurer of the Province of Mas- 
sachusetts from the year 1753 until the Revolution. It was 
probably printed in Boston, as the writer was then living 
here. It somewhat resembles pamphlets published by Edes 
and Gill near that period. Gushing, in his ''Initials and 
Pseudonyms" (page 108), gives Philadelphia as the probable 
place of imprint, and the catalogue of the Boston Athenseum 
says London, with a query. 

Gray, the author, was a prominent tory, and among those 
whose estates were confiscated by statute, though in private 
lif he was a most exemplary person. 

In "McFingal" (Hartford, 1820, page 33,) it is said: 

''What puritan could ever pray- 
In godlier tone, than Treasurer Gray, 
Or at town-meetings speechifying, 
Could utter more melodious whine. 
And shut his eyes, and vent his moan, 
Like owl afflicted in the sun," 

There was a second pamphlet published in Boston during 
the same year, under a similar signature, — "A Friend to 
Peace and good Order," — but there is no other evidence to 
connect the authorship with Gray. It was entitled ''Observa- 
tions on the Reverend Pastor of Roxbury's Thanksgiving 
Discourse." 

Samuel A. Green. 

Boston, November, 1891. 



A 

FEW REMAEKS 

UPON SOME OF THE 

Yotes and Refolutions 

O F T HE 

Continental Congrefs, 

Held at Philadelphia in September, 
AND T HE 

Provincial Congrefs, 

Held at Cambridge in November, 1774. 
By a FRIEND to Peace and good Order. 



O! my People they which lead thee, cause thee to err, and destroy the 
Way of thy Paths, Prophet Isaiah. 

And the People shall be oppressed every one by his Neighbour : The 
Child shall behave himself proudly, against the Ancient, and the 
base against the honourable. Isa. 

But lo ! I will deliver the Men every one into his Neighbours hand, and 
into the hand of his King. Prophet Zachar. 

Wherefore do I see every man with his hands on his Loins as a Woman 
in Travail, and all Faces are turned into paleness. Prophet Jer. 

Printed for the Purchafers in 1775. 



Remarks, &;c. 



IT is a fact not controverted by any, that the opposi- 
tion made by this town and province to a British act 
of 'parliament^ lajdng a duty upon the importation of 
tea in any of the American colonies^ hath involved us 
in great misery and distress ; and that we are threat- 
ened with much greater calamities, the horrors of which are 
beyond description. 

Whether the parliament have or have not a constitutional 
power to impose this duty, I shall not pretend to determine ; 
but this I may venture to say, and I hope without giving 
offence, that the opposition that hath been generally made to 
it, is inconsistent with our profession of Christianity^ with the 
loyalty we owe to our Sovereign, and the reverence and re- 
spect that is due to the British parliament ; and consequent- 
ly, instead of being a means to obtain a repeal of the ACTS, 
will in all probability bring on us a heavier condemnation 
than that of the port-hill^ or the act for the alteration of our 
constitution. All that is proposed by the following pages is 
to give an impartial representation of the destruction of the 
tea in Boston.^ and to make a few remarks upon the proceed- 
ings of the continental and provincial congresses. 

In the month of December, 1773, a number of persons in 
disguise collected from Boston and the neighbouring towns, 
not having the fear of God before their eyes, or the good of 
their country at heart, unlawfully assembled themselves to- 
gether, and in a riotous, tumultuous manner, destroyed a 
great quantity of tea, belonging to the honourable East-India 
company — An action of such a gross immoral nature as cannot 
be justified upon the principles of equity or policy: An ac- 
tion which laid the foundation for the miseries and calami- 
ties we are now groaning under : An action of such a malig- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 45 

nant, atrocious nature, as must expose the wicked perpetra- 
tors of it, without sincere repentance, to the vengeance of 
that Being, wiio is a GOD of order and not of confusion, 
and who will punish all thieves as well as liars in the lake 
which burns with fire and brimstone. 

This diabolical action^ it is true, was disclaimed by the so- 
ber thinking part of the town^ but no steps were taken either 
by the town or government^ to show their dislike of it ; on the 
contrary, many amongst us, who would be thought to be re- 
ligious^ in which class were some of the clergy^ endeavoured 
to palliate the crime, as they said it prevented a worse evil, 
not duly considering that Christianity forbids our doing moral 
evil^ though ever so much good should come from it. 

The parliament of Great- Britain^ highly incensed against 
the town^ for such an outrageous action, thought proper to 
punish us by passing an acf called the port-bill. By which 
act it must be acknowledged that the innocent suffer as much, 
if not more than the guilty, which is often the case in na~ 
tional punishments^ and cannot well be avoided. However, 
as. severe as this act may be accounted for by some, the se- 
verity of it would have been in a great measure lessened, if 
the town had done their duty upon the news we had of the 
bill's having the royal sanction^ by paying the money to the 
order of the East-India company ; and had they complied 
with the other parts of the act^ which justice and good policy 
required them to do, the jjort would not have been shut up 
above four months, the damages then would have been in- 
considerable to what we now suffer by our refusing to comply 
with the requisitions of said act ; the charitable donations 
from the other governinents.^ being very short of a compensa- 
tion for what we suffer by the loss of our trade.,— But to do 
justice to the sober thinking part of the town, upon the cer- 
tain news of the port bills being carried into an act., they 
thought it to be our interest and duty immediately to pay for 
the tea ; accordingly a town meeting was called to consult 
what was proper to be done upon this alarming occasion ^ 



46 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

And it seemed to be the sense of most who were then pres- 
ent, that out of policy at least, we ought to comply with the 
requisitions of the act^ but many difficulties were started as 
to the manner of doing it ; some proposed the voting of the 
money directly; this was objected to, as being illegal, the 
toivn not having au}^ authority by Imv to raise monies for that 
purpose without the special aid of the general courts but as 
they were to set in a few weeks, it was motioned that a peti- 
tion should be preferred to them to enable the town to borrow 
the money upon the credit of a future tax ; others thought 
that the province ought to pay the money, or at least to let 
them have the loan of it for a number of years without in- 
terest, and that a committee should be raised to apply to them 
for that purpose : But others, whose importance and politi- 
cal salvation depend upon the j9ro?;m(?e being kept in a con- 
tinual flame, and observing that the general sense of the town 
was in favour of paying for the tea^ though they did not 
chuse openly to oppose such a righteous measure^ yet artfully 
threw difficulties in the way of the different methods that 
were proposed : They did not pretend to deny the justice 
and equity of paying for it, but observed that this act might 
affect all the colonies ; and that as in all probability there 
would soon be a continental congress^ it would be our wisdom 
to do nothing until we had the united sense of the colonies, 
and that they did not doubt they would recommend the pay- 
ment for the tea, and each colony would willingly advance 
their proportion of it ; whereas, if we should immediately 
order the payment they may possibly resent it, and construe 
it as our submitting to the act of parliament imposing the 
duty upon that article, and so the union and harmony which 
at present subsists between the colonies would be in great 
danger of being destroyed. — In the mean time it was pro- 
posed that we should represent to the several colonies our 
distressed condition, praying them for relief for our suffering 
biethren, who were out of employ by reason of the port-hill. 
These reasons, though altogether destitute of sincerity, 
seemed to be very plausible, and they accordingly had their 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 47 

effect: And the town did nothing further concerning it. 
The general court met upon the last Wednesday in May, 
and were adjourned to Salem the Tuesday following, but as 
no application was made to them, they took no order relative 
to it: And as nothing was done by the general courts nor 
likely to be done by the tow7i^ in order to op(ui the port^ the 
worthy tradesmen began to be y^rj uneasy, and thought it 
proper that they, who were like to be such great sufferers, 
should have a meeting by themselves, and consult what was 
proper to be done to prevent their ruin ; they accordingly 
assembled at Faneuil Hall to the number of two or three 
hundred, and many, if not most of them, went with a resolu- 
tion to use their endeavors that the tea should be paid for ; 
but so artful and industrious were the principal heads of the 
opposition to government^ that they placed themselves at the 
doors of the hall and told the tradesmen as they entered, 
' that now was the time to save our country. — That if they 
gave their voice in favor of paying for the tea, we should be 
undone, and the chains of slavery would be riveted upon us! 
which so terrified many honest, well meaning persons, that 
they thought it not prudent to act at all in the affair, and 
so nothing was concluded upon. 

The next day the committee of correspondtnce dispersed 
among the people a most wicked, diabolical hand bill called a 
league and covenant, which was sent to everj^ toivn and dis- 
trict in the province, calling upon the inhabitants to sign it, 
which paper was introduced in many towns by the minister 
of the parish, who set them the example of signing first, and 
then called upon his parishioners to engage in the same cove- 
nant, and to sign it upon the communion table, and it is re- 
ported that a certain clergyman in the county of Plymouth, 
gravely told his people, that they who refused to sign it were 
not worthy to come to that fa^Ze. I do not pretend to say 
positively that this is a fact, though it is generally believed : 
But be that as it may, it is certain that many of the dissent- 
ing clergy liave so far prostituted their sacred office as to be 
leaders and encouragers of the people to sign this wicked 



48 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

covenant, whereby they have led many of theiT people to 
commit the horrible crime of perjury ; for not one of many 
hnndrecl of those who have signed it have paid any regard to 
it, and what makes it more surprising that they should have 
exerted themselves upon that occasion is, that not one in 
Boston where this covenant was fabricated has signed it ; and 
consequently every countryman who has, and has any deal- 
ings with the Bostonians must infallibly perjure himself. 

We have now done with the solemn league and covenant, 
and shall proceed to the considerations of the proceedings of 
the continental Congress. In the month of September they 
assembled at Philadelphia with all the pomp and grandeur 
of Plenipotentiaries ; when the expectations of the people in 
general were, that by their wise and prudent councils, re- 
spectful and dutiful petitions to his Majesty and to his par- 
liament, a door would be open for the supreme legislature of 
Great Britain, consistent with the honor and dignity of that 
august assembly, to have our grievances redressed, and that 
the first step that would have been taken for that purpose, 
would have been to have advised the town of Boston to pay 
for the tea. But alass how have we been disappointed! 
Those persons who have been the occasion of our political 
troubles in this province, were members of this continental 
body, and having already become desperate themselves had 
no other card to play, but to involve the whole continent in 
their rebellion. — No doubt vainly imagining, that although a 
single town or province may be reduced by the power of 
Great-Britain; they would not venture an attack against 
the whole continent. — The Massachusetts delegates so iar 
succeeded in their plan, that the first thing the congress did 
that was made public, was the adopting of the resolutions of 
the country of Suffolk, which were not short of high treason 
diiidi rebellion, iiothm^ healing or salutary could then be ex- 
pected from such a congress, the only apology that could be 
made for their conduct was, that they came into this vote 
immediately after drinking thirty two bumpers of the best 
madeira, and it seems the next morning when their heads 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 49 

were cool, they were ashamed of what they had done, but it 
was then too late for a reconsideration of the vote, a copy of 
it attested by the president, having been forwarded to Boston 
by our worthy citizen Paul Revere^ who was dispatched from 
Boston as a courier with the Suffolk resolves; however, to 
avoid making any such mistakes for the future, they prudent- 
ly determined to do no business after dinner. 

Their whole proceedings as they are made public, no 
doubt are in the hands of every gentleman who hath any 
taste for political controversy, though, by the way, they cau- 
tiously omitted inserting this extraordinary vote in the pam- 
phlet they published, entitled, ^'Extracts from the votes and 
proceedings of the American continental congress." 

As several gentlemen at New York^ have made very sensi- 
ble remarks upon their proceedings, and have proved to 
demonstration if their association be strictly adhered to, we 
must be involved in one common ruin: For trade and com- 
merce is the support of t\\Q farmer as well as the merchant and 
shopkeeper; and the foundation of learning; without which 
in process of time, tliere will be no true rational religion 
amongst us; and as their writings are dispersed through the 
province, it is needless for me fully and particularly to ani- 
madvert upon them ; However, it may not be amiss to. make 
a few cursory remarks upon their conduct, wdiich, whether 
pertinent or not, is humbl}^ submitted. 

And here it is worthy of notice, they have reduced the 
number of those that were concerned in the destruction of 
the tea, to thirty or forty, when it is evident that two 
THOUSAND at least, were emploj^ed either directly in destroy- 
ing the tea, or in keeping a centry at the entrance of the 
wharf where tlie ships lay, and at those wharves contiguous 
thereto. I'hey then exclaim against the severity of the poi^t 
hill, in punishing thirti/ thousand, as they say, for the offence 
of a few individuals. It is possible that most of the congress 
might not have been acquainted with the truth of the fact, 
and depending upon the veracity of the Massachusetts dele- 
gates, put full faith and confidence in their representations, 



50 MAGAZINE OF NEAV ENGLAND HISTORY. 

he tliat as it may, it is manifest that those memhers who went 
from Boston^ knew better, they certainly gave their voice in 
favor of a notorious falsehood^ knowing it to be such. What 
apology then can be made for gentlemen of their exalted 
CHARACTER, that for the sake of carrying a point, could be 
guilty of such a crime, that every one who is not entirely lost 
to all sense of honor would be ashamed of? Possibly these 
casuistical ?ind patriotic, not to sdi,y Jesuitical gentlemen, to 
ease their consciences, may think it no harm to lie for the 
good of their country; and as it is said they have often en- 
thusiastically declared, they would willingly sacrifice their 
lives and fortunes in defence of their civil rights and liberties, 
and as they have little or no property to lose, in order to 
transmit their names with honor to posterity, they are willing 
to part with their souls in lieu of it; but to adopt the lan- 
guage of inspiration with a very little variance, ''What will 
it profit a man tho' he recovers all his civil rights and privi- 
leges, if he loses his own soul ?" 

We shall now proceed to make a few strictures upon the 
tenth article of their association, which runs thus, "In case 
" any merchant or trader, or other person, shall import any 
" goods or merchandize after the first day of December, and 
" before the first day of February next, the same ought f orth- 
" with at the election of the owner, to be either reshipped or 
" delivered up to the committee of the county or town 
" wherein they shall be imported, to be stored at the risk of 
" the importer, until the non-importation agreement shall 
" cease ; or be sold under the direction of the committee 
" aforesaid ; and in the last mentioned case, the owner, or 
" owners of such goods, shall be reimbursed (out of the 
" sales) the first cost and charges ; the profit, if any, be to 
" be applied towards relieving and employing such poor in- 
" habitants of the town of Boston, as are immediate sufferers 
" by the Boston port-bill ; and a particular account of all 
" goods so returned, stored or sold, to be inserted in the pub- 
" lie papers. And if any goods or merchandize shall be im- 
" ported after the said first day of February, the same ought 



MAGAZINE OF NEAY ENGLAND HISTORY. 51 

" forthwith to be sent back, without breaking any of the 
'• packages thereof." This association was agreed upon the 
20th of October, 1774. 

Although there is nothing compulsive in this article, yet 
being compared with some other of their articles and re- 
solves, it is manifest they designed it should have the opera- 
tion of law ; and it hath accordingly had that effect in regard 
to several vessels that have arrived at Sa^lem and Plymouth, 
since the first day of December, the owners of which car" 
goes have had their goods piratically taken from them and 
exposed to public sale, agreeable to the forementioned article. 

Now admitting for argument sake, this congress were con- 
stitutionally the supreme legislature of the whole continent^ 
could anything be more unjust, tyrannical, arbitrary and op- 
pressive ? Can the edicts of the most despotic princes under 
heaven exceed it ? Pray what offence against the laws of 
God or man, or even against the sense of the continent, have 
these merchants been guilt}^ of, who have ordered goods to 
be shipped them from Great Britain, Ireland, or the West- 
Indies, and which could not possibly arrive here 'till after 
the first day of December, that they should be subjected to 
such severe penalties? Was it in their power from the 
twentieth of October to give counter orders to their corres- 
pondents, if they were so disposed, that should reach them 
in time to prevent their shipping of the goods? By no 
means ; they knew it to be impossible at least for the prov- 
ince of the Massachusetts, who were not acquainted Avith 
the determination of the congress 'till the beginning of No- 
vember. It is therefore no breach of charity to suppose 
that the motive that induced them to pass such a wicked 
edict, was, that the profits arising thereby should be applied 
for the relief and employ of the poor inhabitants of the town 
of Boston, who are immediate sufferers by the Boston port 
bill. 

Charity to the proper objects of it, is no doubt a christian 
duty, and a sacrifice acceptable to the Supreme Being; and 
God forbid that anything should be said to discourage it . 



52 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

but it is an old saying that we ought not to rob Peter to pay 
Paul ; nay, charity to the poor, when what we bestow on 
them is the fruit of theft and robbery^ is so far from being a 
sacrifice with which God will be well pleased; that it will 
be a stench in his nostrils. It is no better than if a number 
of VILLAINS should enter into an association, to go upon the 
highway, and rob every gentleman they should meet, with a 
pious design to relieve their poor brethren who were suffer- 
ing in Newgate for their crimes ; or even for the relief of 
those, who by the providence of God were reduced to a state 
of poverty, in neither of which cases would they be enti- 
tled to the reward which is promised the charitable christian. 

Besides, these poor inhabitants among whom this charity 
is distributed, are not all of them necessarily sufferers by the 
port-bill. Many of them might have been employed by the 
army in their respective occupations, whereby they would 
have accumulated more wealth than they possibly could have 
earned, if that act called the Boston port-bill had never been 
passed, but they were prevented by the troublers of our Is- 
rael, lest a stop should be put to the charitable donations 
from the neighboring colonies. Now the real unavoidable 
sufferers by this act are the merchants and traders, and con- 
sequently they are the persons who have an equitable claim 
at least to a part of the donations ; but instead of consider- 
ing them in that light, the wisdom of the congress hath laid 
a tax upon them, to support some of those who by their in- 
dustry in their several callings may get as comfortable a 
support as if this act had never passed. ''Tell it not in 
Gath!" 

The continental congress have recommended it to the re- 
spective provincial congresses, to make such further orders 
as may by them be thought necessary to carry their orders 
into execution, which naturally leads me to take some no- 
tice of the proceedings of the provincial congress of the 
Massachusetts Bay held at Cambridge in November, 1774. 

But before we proceed to make any remarks upon their 
(jonduct, it will not be improper to observe, that the conti- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 53 

nental congress as they had no business with any acts of 
parliament, but those that affected all the colonies, conse- 
quently the Boston port-bill, and the act for altering the 
charter and government of the Massachusetts Bay and the 
Quebec bill, ought to have been out of the question any fur- 
ther than as the port-bill being manifestly for the punish- 
ment of a certain offence that was charged upon the town of 
Boston, they ought to have advised them to pay the money 
for the tea, so that all the colonies might stand upon an 
equal footing in their humble application to his Majesty 
and to the parliament of Great Britain, to repeal the act for 
laying a duty upon the importation of tea, in which all the 
colonies are equally concerned. But for them to pretend 
that the port-bill affected all the colonies, and therefore it 
was their duty to interest themselves in it, is perfectly ridic- 
ulous. The respective inhabitants of each colony may with 
as much propriety object to a law made by their own assem- 
blies for punishing theft with death, and even endeavor to 
rescue a delinquent, because possibly it may hereafter be 
their own turn to suffer for the like offence. But the folly 
and ingratitude of the congress, it is humbly apprehended, 
will a[)j)ear in a strii^ing point of light by the following 

similitude. 

Let us suppose a wealthy farmer had acquired a consider- 
able real estate, and was the father of ten sons ; and that 
these children were very serviceable to him in their minority? 
in clearing his lands and improving his farms; at the same 
time lie exercised a tender and paternal care and affection 
for them, and assisted them in setting out in life ; and al- 
though they had got the means of a comfortable subsistence, 
they were still in a great measure dependent upon their aged 

father. And that one of them who had in a peculiar man- 
ner, been nourished by his indulgent parent, impatient of 
those restraints that every parent hath a right to lay upon 
his children, should unnaturally rebel against him, throw off 
his dependence, and treat him in an insulting, injurious man- 
ner, so as to provoke the father to disinherit him, and turn 
him off from his farm, which he occupied by sufferance, and 



5-4: MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

by that niecans this rehelUous son was reduced to great want 
and indigence. And suppose that his ifidulgent father at the 
same time willing to receive him to his favor, and reinstate 
liim in the possession of his farm, by the improvement of 
which he could get a comfortable support, upon the easy 
conditions of his humble submission, and recognizing his 
proper authority, and his promising to obey him in all things 
lawful for the future. Suppose this undutiful son should re- 
ject these lenient proposals, with indignation, and continuing 
in his rebellious conduct, should apply to his brethren for 
support, and they, instead of advising their unhappy brother 
to go to his offended father and say, ^'Father I have sinned 
against heaven and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to 
be called thy son, treat me as one of thy hired servants." 
Should for answer, say, our father is grown old and pevish, 
and become a tyrant, and designs to make us all slaves; 
when he has subdued you, he will attack us; wherefore we 
advise you by no means to submit to his arbitrary injunc- 
tions, and we will support you ; and when he finds there is a 
UNION amongst us to oppose his tyrannical measures, he will 
restore you to his favor, for we know he has a peculiar af- 
fection for you. But admitting the old gentleman should 
think his honor was too much concerned to give up this un- 
happy controversy without a humble submission on your part, 
and should persist in oppressing you, we will enter into an 
association among ourselves, and endeavor to engage all oar 
friends not to have any commercial dealings with him, or 
with those who shall countenance him ; we will not pur- 
chase any of the produce of his farm, we will discourage his 
hired servants from working for him, or any ways assisting 
him, in ploughing, sowing and reaping ; in which case, his 
farms will be rendered in a manner useless to him ; neither 
will we supply his friends and those who adhere to him, 
with the necessaries of life ; we will convince the old tyrant 
that we can live without him, as well as he can live without 
us ; and altho' we acknowledge that he hath formerly been 
very kind to us, yet we have fully balanced all his favors by 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 55 

the profits that he has accumulated by our labor ; and fur- 
ther, dear brother, that you may not suffer in your glorious 
OPPOSITION to him, we will seize upon the produce of his 
farm, if he should send any to market after the first of De- 
cember, and apply a certain proportion of it for your sup- 
port. Now I ask you,if children could act such an unnatural, 
unfilial part, what must the sober, judicious part of mankind 
think of them ? What must the aged^ compassionate father 
think of them ? And how must he treai them ? Not surely 
as sons^ but as bastards. And what do you think, if these 
rebellious children should have such interest with some of 
the ministtrs of the gospel., that they in their public addresses 
to heaven, gave thanks that God had put it into the hearts 
of these children to contribute for the relief of their rebel- 
lious brother, when part of the support thus afforded him, 
was what they got by robbery. The application of this si- 
militude is very obvious and needs no comment. 

Having finished the remarks which I originally designed 
to make upon the proceedings of the grand continental con- 
gres, by some sycophants and flatterers called the collected 
ivlsdom of the colonies., I shall proceed very briefly to ani- 
madvert upon some of the votes or resolutions of the pro- 
vincial congress held at Cambridge in November last ; and 
here it is proper to observe tliat two gentlemen of the conti- 
nental were also members of tlie provincial congress, and 
by their influence no doubt obtained a vote to confirm and 
adopt the proceedings of the grand congress, and as though 
what they had done w^as not suflicient to ruin the trade of 
the town and country, in order to compleat our misery, this 
new fangled congress unconstitutionally assembled, have in 
addition thereto, recommended, that in the month of Octo- 
ber, 1775, the committees of inspection for the several towns 
in the province should repair to tfie several stores and shops, 
and take an invoice of the goods they shall then have by 
them, and strictly forbid their exposing any of them for sale, 
and if tlie respective owners of such goods shall refuse to 
comply with their demands, they are directed to take them 



66 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

into tlieir possession and store them at the risque of the 
owners until the acts they comphiin of are repealed ; and 
the inhabitants of the towns where such goods are found, 
are advised to assist them in this high-handed robbery. 

Now, can it be supposed, that any set of men professing 
Christianity, or even common honesty, can possibly be guilty 
of a greater offence ! Nay, is the crime of a highwayman, 
who robs the rich traveller of a few guineas, to be compared 
with this for its iniquity ? By no means ; the latter is not 
so great an offender as the former ; for in one case the gen- 
tleman only loses a few guineas (as it may be he can very 
well spare) ; but in the other, many a family may be deprived 
of the means of support, and in time be reduced to the most 
abject state of poverty. The congress not content with 
this wicked resolve have impiously recommended it to the 
ministers of the gospel, who by their sacred ofhce, are not 
only to preach the doctrine of grace but to inculcate the du- 
ties of morality, in which a due submission to government is 
included ; I say, have advised them by their circular letters, 
to use their endeavors, that their tyrannical and wricked di- 
rections be put in execution. But as the weapons of those 
reverend gentlemen are not, or ought not to be carnal, but 
spiritual, it is to be hoped they will not make use of the 
former, but confine themselves to the latter. And certainly 
it would be more for the reputation of the clergy^ and the 
real interest of religion^ if instead of preaching politicks, as 
too many of them do, they would cry aloud and not spare, 
but lift up their voice like a trumpet, and show unto Boston 
their transgressions, and unto the whole province their sins. 
and plainly tell them, that it is "their iniquities that have 
separated between them and their God," and have occasioned 
the loss of what they esteem their rights and privileges ; 
and that sincere repentance and reformation are the only 
means to have them restored to us. But while we continue 
in a state of rebellion, "despising government," "speaking 
evil of dignities," and reviling the ruler of God's people" — 
encouraging mobs, riots and tumults — destroying the sub- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HTSTORY. 57 

stance of our fellow creatures ; insulting and abusing tlieir 
persons in such a manner as a Barbarian would be ashamed 
of ; and robbing them of their private property, to enable us 
to do acts of charity to the poor ; it will be of no avail to 
us to observe days of prayer and humiliation. With such 
sacrifices God will not be well pleased, but will say to us as 
he did bj^^his prophet Isaiah to his people of old, "When 
you spread forth your hands I will hide mine eyes from you ; 
yea, when you make many prayers . I will not hear ; your 
hands are full of blood ; 3^ou have made lies your refuge, 
and under falsehoods you have hid yourselves." 

I have now finished what I first proposed, but cannot 
conclude without a word or two of advice to my deluded 
countrymen, who have been drawn into rebellion by the lies 
and misrepresentations of artful, wricked, and desperate 
men. I would charitably hope, that when you first enlisted 
under their banners, you designed no more than a rational 
peaceable defending jonv rights and privileges, and 
had you been early told that you should ever have gone 
such lengths as you have, no doubt you would have adopted 
the language of Hazael and answered, "Is thy servant a 
dog, that lie can do such things ;" and as many of you have 
forfeited your lives by your treasonable practices, you may 
possibly think that there will be no mercy for you, and that 
therefore you had as good persist in 3^our rebellion as not ; 
but let me tell you this is a suggestion of tlie devil. Our 
most GRACIOUS sovereign is far from being vindictive. 
Punishment is his strange work ; and he never inflicts any, 
but when the honor and dignity of governmefit^ and the real 
good of his subjects require it. And although the ringlead- 
ers of this horrible rebellion may meet with the punishment 
that their crimes do justly deserve, yet those who have been 
deluded by them, if they give evident proof of their repent- 
ance and submission to goveryiment^ and that speedily, m?ij 
have some reason to hope, that from his Majesty's wonted 
clemency, they shall obtain forgiveness. 

Let me therefore entreat you, if you have any love for 



58 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

your country^ any affection for your wives and children^ and 

regard for your own safety and happiness, to lay down the 
weapons of your rebellion, and submit yourselves to the 
wise, lenient and constitutional government we have the 
happiness to be under; for we have abundant evidence of 
his Majesty's tender and impartial regard for the rights of 
his subjects ; and altho' he will not suffer those who deny his 
authority^ and the authority of his parliament to escape 
with impunity^ yet he will ****** 
that may contribute to the peace, happiness and prosperity of 
his colony of the Massachusetts Bay^ and which may have the 
effect to show to the world, that he has no wish beyond that 
of reigning in the hearts and affections of his people. 



It may be interesting to add to the foregoing reprint, the 
following abstract from the Pennsylvania Journal, of Feb. 8, 
1775: "A dispictable pamphlet lately published in Boston, 
now commonly called the ^Grey Maggot^'' has asserted, 'That 
the only apology which could be made for the conduct of the 
Continental Congress in adopting the Suffolk resolves, was 
that they came into this vote immediately after drinking 
thirty-two bumpers of Madeira, of which the next morning, 
when their heads were cool, they were ashamed, and then pru- 
dently determined not to do the business till after dinner for 
the future.' If it would not offend the characters of that 
truly august assembly to take so much notice of this most 
impudent and false assertion, as seriously to contradict it, 
we would say, that it appears from the minutes of the con- 
gress, that as they sat till late in the afternoon, they never 
did any business after dinner, and that the Suffolk resolves 
were acted upon Saturday, in the forenoon. From this in- 
stance the public may sea to what an astonishing height of 
unblushing falsehood and the basest calumny against the 
most respectable characters, the enemies of our common 
rights have now attained ; and how ready the}' are to per- 
form any dirty drudgery for the sake of procuring or pre- 
serving a titled or lucrative place." 

Gra}^, the author of the pamphlet in question, went in 

1776 to Flalifax with his family, from which place he soon 

sailed for England, where he died. — [Ed, 



Extracts from Letter Book of Samuel Hubbard. 

CONTRIBUTED BY EAY GREENE HULING, NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 




{Continued from Vol. i, 1891^ page 201.) 

lictters. 
XVIT. 

t. N July 3, 1669, Mr. Hubbard wrote to the cliurcb in 
Bell Lane, London, and said : 

Some of us, and such as was none of tlie least among 

T us, as Brother Wyld, a old disciple, and his wife, a 
knowing woman and much spake for this holy truth, and 
Brother John Salmon and his wife, have forsaken this truth 
and us, and turned back to full communion with this church ; 
and not only so, but prate against this holy truth and Brother 
Wyld have writ against it, I judge a fooli>h nonsense paper 
(or pamphlet) in a high esteem of himself and some others. 
It is a very hard exercise to us, poor weak ones, to lose four 
so suddenly out of 11 of us here. Again, upon these falling 
off, the brethren have in public preached and make it their 
work so to deal most every day ; to my trouble I sometimes 
indeed object in a weak measure and bear a testimony 
against them, and in every deed in my conscience I cannot 
safely communicate with such as preach, yt all the 10 com- 
mands are nailed to the cross and done awa}^, but renewed 
again some of them. I am sure that can't be ; if nailed to 
the cross, no renewing again. Man}^ such things to n^y 
grief, and to us all, and I have not full communion as in the 
ordinance of breaking of bread with them, tliongh prest 
hard to it. Oh ! methinks 1 could for many reasons leave 
them qnite, only owning such as have not nor dare speak 
against God's law ; but others do not so judge as yet; its 



60 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

very liard to me and to them. One that is fallen off calls 
tliose good books of the bretheriii Stennett, Covvell, and B. 
Setlers, a rabble of lyes ; one saitli, also, that your letter and 
IJro. Stennett's, Bro. Cowell sent us, legal (sic), which was 
very sweet to us and very profitable. Alas, I am so weak, 
poor, feeble creature, not able to bear these small things. 
What will become of me if fiery tryals should come I But 
this is my comfort, my God is all-sufficient and mighty to 
save, and will deliver, I trust. 

Note. The church in Bell Lane, London, was a Seventh 
Day Baptist chuich. Of Wyld and his wife, nothing more 
is known. Salmon has been mentioned in a previous note. I 
Dr. Stennett was the pastor of the church in Bell Lane. 

XVIJI. i 

A letter to Roger Bastard of Newport from A. C, a pris- j 
oner in Pljaiiouth Lsland, this 26, 7 m, 1667, says: -^t 

"There went over to your parts since you did, Thos. 
Wilkey and his wife, and Sergeant Turner and his, some of 
which formerly were members of the church of Dartmouth." 

Note. Roger Baster (as the name is commonly written) 
was a freeman at Newport, 1666, and united with the Hub- 
bards and others in forming the Seventh Day Baptist Church 
Dec. 23, 1671. He died in 1687. Sergeant Turner is sup- 
posed by Dr. Backus to be the Captain Turner of Boston 
who was persecuted for adherence to the Baptist faith, and 
who was killed in Philip's War. The Plymouth and Dart- 
mouth here mentioned are the English towns of the name. 

XIX. 

Alexander LeBond wrote an affectionate address to Mr. 
Clarke and his church, dated the 16th of 11m, 1669. 

XX. 
A letter from Westerly to Providence : 

Unto our beloved in the Lord, Thomas Olney, with that 
little remnant of Christ's lambs with you at Providence, 
grace, mercy and peace be abundantly bestowed on you from 
(xod, even our Father, thi'o' our dear Lord Jesus Christ. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 61 

Dear and well beloved in Christ Jesus, both your Lord 
! and ours, we salute you in the Lord by our brother Randall. 
' We have had information of yr welfare, the which hath ad- 
ministered matter of comfort and joy unto us, wth thanks- 
\ giv'g unto God the Father of all our mercies, with earnest 
desires, yt yo may continue tog'r in love and be filled wth 
the knowledge of his will in all wisdom and spiritual under- 
standing, that you may walk worth}^ of the Lord unto all 
well pleasing, being fruitful *in every good work, and in- 
creasing in the knowledge of God : for this shall be to your 
great consolation when our Lord shall come to be glorified in 
his saints ; and we hope yo are well acquainted, 3^t it is a 
duty much incumbant (sic) upon yo to be constant in a holy 
and fruitf al life and conversation, for thereby God is greatly 
honored and his grace made known in yo wherein we hope 
yo will be careful and in yt respect be labouring to build up 
and edify one another in love, as indeed assuring yourselves 
yt ye have but a short time here upon earth ; for in that con- 
sideration yt we are but strangers and pilgrims here, and are 
looking for a city wch hathfound'n whose builder and maker 
is God, it doth greatly concern us to be looking homeward, 
yea, and so much the rather because tlie day is at hand, at 
least the day to lay down our earthly tabernacles : therefore, 
since we are ye children of ye light and of the day, let us 
not sleep as do others, but let us watch and be sober, etc. 

Dearly beloved Brother Olney, we rec'd your lines and la- 
bour of love by our Bro. Randall, whicli did admin'r no 
small comfort and joy unto us, and the counsel of uur Lord 
by you and your love tlierein communicated unto us, we 
humbly and heartily embrace, desiring of tlie Lord to 
place it in our hearts. 

Dear brotlier, concerning that particular which yo query 
into towards ye close of yr epistle, we inform and yt we 
hope truly, that here are a few of us who thro' great grace 
do, according to light rec'd from the Lord (we trust) by his 
holy scriptures of truth, and accord'g to our weak measure 
are in the practice of keeping liis holy Sabbath, even the 7th 



f 



62 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



(lay. As touching our grounds for the same, we hope we 
shall faithfully altho', peredventure briefly, give yo an acc't 
earnestly desiring that ye Lord wo'd be pleased to help yo to 
lav aside all self-interest and prejudice, and wth a humble 
and lowly frame, to read these ensuing places of scripture 
and consider of them, hav'g yr souls carried up in breath- 
ings unto the Lord for light, and we doubt not but wth 
blessing of ye Lord this truth of his will not appear unto 
YO so strange as it is true. The first yo find in yt 2 chap. 
Gen. and ver. 2, 3, unto wch we shall add jt 2 chap, of 
Mark and ver. 27, where you may plainly see by whom it 
was made and appointed, and also for whom it was made ; 
we shall also recommend unto yo the 20 chap, of Exodus, 
ver. 8, 9, 10, 11, where yo may see yt God hath placed it in 
the midst of his holy and righteous law, to wit., those ten 
precepts requiring obedience of his people thereunto as unto 
any of the other. Further yo may see in yt Mat. 5 : 17, 18, 
19, etc., also the 16 of Luke, ver. 17, and Jer. 2: 8, 9, 10, 
11, also yt practice of our Lord, and also of his apostles, in 
special Paul, who was an apostle particularly sent unto the 
gentiles, whose practice it was, as we may frequently take 
notice in tlie Acts of the Apostles, as chap. 18, and ye 14, 
42, 44 verses, and chap. 19: 2, with many other places. One 
place more is ye 24 chap, of Mat. and ye 20th, the wch 
with the other scriptures before mentioned, we earnestly de- 
sire yo seriously and ponderously to read and consider; and 
ye Lord open yr eyes yt yo may behold the wonderful things 
of his law ; and yt yo may consider of yr ways and turn yr 
feet into his testimonies ; so pray yours who thro' great grace 
do believe in God thro' Jesus Christ unto eternal life. 

Joseph Clarke, 

Ruth Burdick. 
From Miscomatucs 

alias Westerle, 
3d of October, 1669. 

Note. Thomas Olney, Jr., (b. 1632, d. 1722) was or- 
dained pastor of the First Baptist Church of Providence i 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 63 

1668. The bearer of the letter was, without doubt, John 
Randall of Westerly, who died in 1685. He, like the sign- 
ers of the letter, was a member of the Seventh Day Baptist 
Church of Newport, whose members were in part resident 
in Westerly. Ruth Burdick was the oldest daughter of 
Samuel Hubbard, and the wife of Robert Burdick of West- 
erly. Joseph Clarke was the son-in-law of Mr. Hubbard, 
having married the latter's j^oungest daughter Betthiah. He 
was son of Joseph Clarke of Newport, who was the brother 
of Dr. John Clarke. For many years he served as clerk of 
the church. , 

XXI. 

The bretherin of the Church of Christ at Providence to 
their loving brother, Samuel Hubbard, sendeth greeting: 

Well beloved brother, your affectionate letter we have 
rec'd and read and are glad to see those breathings of God 
stirring in yo wch are as lively coles to stir us up from deeds 
wch too much doth surprise us. Your good exhortations are 
well resented by us ; praying to God yt we may make a good 
and holy use of them, for thi'o' God's mercy being sensable 
of our slackness to duty, had need indeed to improve every 
opportunity and accept all good exhortations for our help 
to further quickening. We dare not excuse ourselves con- 
cerning our slowness in writing, but rather do judge we may 
have failed in duty, yet not in love and affection to any of 
God's people, for we have been taught by our Lord, whose 
servants we trust we are, to love one another. But as iron 
sharpeneth iron, so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his 
friend. We are therefore bold in our God to put you in 
mind by way of remembrance also, that we all must put off, 
before it be long, our earthly tabernacle, and lay down our 
flesh in hope of a joyful resurrection ; which time being so 
short sho'd be upon our hearts to be improving the same to 
the Lord and our best advantage, to redeem the time be- 
cause the days are evil, that we may be found of him in 
love, both towards Christ and all his people, laying aside all 



64 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

thino's which do offend, and faithfully follow the Lord as 
dear children, and walk in love, in which state to be found 
will be comfortable to all in the day of Christ's appearance, 
and will be a time of refreshing to those that look for him and 
stand ready with their loins girded and their lamps burn- 
ing, watching the cunning subtlities of the adversary; a 
caution yt our Lord gave to his disciples, — Watch ye, there- 
fore, for ye know neither the day nor the hour when the son 
of man will come. And let us mind our duty wdiiles we are 
here, to be in the exercise of those graces God have given us, 
that so we may be fitted to receive that blessedness wch 
Christ speaks of, blessed is yt servant who when his Lord 
Cometh shall find so doing. And as yo hint unto us of mind- 
ing God's commandments, so we are bold in love to put you 
in mind also of the same duty, wch is requisite yt we all be 
found in, viz : that we love one another— John 13 ; 34, and 
15: 12; for love covereth a multitude of transgressions. 
But, brother, we think (if we are not mistaken) yt your 
hint of no wilful breakers of God's commandments hath 
some further meaning than is expressed ; wch if so, we wish 
you had writ your full mind ; for considering your practice, 
it suites well with jy phrase and wt that intent was, wch we 
being not clear, for yt way of 7th day Sabbath, and judging 
yo hinted at it, we are bold (and we hope no more than wel- 
come to you) to put a few queries to yr consideration, per- 
suading ourselves yt yo have thoroughly weighed them be- 
fore yo went upon the practice. 

1. Query — If this 7th day now be to be kept as a holy 
Sabbath to God by virtue of God's command, whether the 
same manner of worship be not now also to be kept, wch 
was commanded of God to be performed upon that day ? in 
particular which was 2 lambs ; or where is there a takeing 
away of the one and a continuation of the other? 

2. Whether if there be a takeing away of the one and 
not the other, it be not against these scriptures ? Mat. 19:6; 
Deut. 4 : 2. 

3. Whether the breach of the 7th day Sabbath be not 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOBY. 65 

punishable now as it was among the Jews, and by whom, 
seeing God never put neglect of his worship to be punished 
by heathen magistrates ? For he gave his law to Jacob, and 
his statutes to Israel, and did not so to any other nation. 

4. Whether Moses did not put a vail over his face for 
what was commanded in that which was ingraven in stones ; 
whether the glory of what was figurative in them be not now 
done away, or else what is the true meaning of 2d Cor. 3:7? 
We pray yo, brother, w^ell mind these queries and ponder 
them with a faithful and upright heart, yt so yo may wth a 
clear conscience to God perform yr duty to him, in hearken- 
ing wt is com'd by the Son, and yt in all things which he 
hath commanded. We could have wrote more to yo and 

things yt sways with us wch until yo resolve these which 
we have wrote by sound arguments we forbear. Tlius wish- 
ing you good prosperity in God's wa}^, we take leave and 
rest. 

Commend us unto your wife and daughter Rachel. 

Subscribed to by the appointment 
of the church. 

Thomas Olney, Senior. 
Providence, this 
18th 2 mo. '70. 

Note. The writer seems b}- the title "senior" to have 
been the elder Thomas Olney, then seventy years of age, 
father of the pastor of the First Baptist Church of Provi- 
dence. He emigrated from St. Albans, Hartford Co., Eng- 
land, in 1635, with his wife and two sons. Two vears later 
he was at Salem. In 1638 he "had license to depart from 
Massachasetts," and was ordered to appear at the next court, 
"if not gone before." The following autumn he was at 
Providence, and was one of the twelve to whom Roger Wil- 
liams deeded the land first purchased from the Indians. He 
^as in 1639 one of the twelve original members of the First 
Baptist Church. He frequently held civil office for the next 
hirty years, and died in 1782. His wife was jNIary Small. 

(To be Continued.) 



Notes. 

The Bicknells. — The Bicknell family of Rhode Island 
is one of the oldest of our New England stock, and attention 
is called to it, at this time, by a notice of the death of James 
Bicknell, of East Providence, R. I., at the remarkable age of 
96 3^ears and 10 days. Zachary and Agnes Bicknell, with 
their son John and servant John Kitchen, were passengers in 
company with Rev. Joseph Hull and 102 others, who left Wey- 
mouth, England, and settled in Weymouth, Mass., in 1635. 
Zachary, the father, died in 1636, and from the boy John 
have descended nearly all of the Bicknell name in New 
England and even in the United States. The first Bick- 
nell boy, named John, born on Massachusetts soil, lived to be 
84 years of age. About the year 1700, Zachary, in the 3d 
generation from the planter, married Hannah Smith of 
Swanzey, and they settled in life on what was then known as 
the "westward end of Swanzey," now Barrington, R. I., and 
here his descendants have lived to the present time, some of 

the land of the original Bicknell farm being still held by the 
family. 

While the members of the family have been noted for 
industr}^, temperance, and useful, social and religious service, 
the most noted branch of the family as regards longevity, is 
that of the late Hon. Joshua Bicknell, who bore an active 
and honorable part in Rhode Island history from his entrance 
into public life in 1787, till his death a half century later, in 
1837. Joshua Bicknell was born in Barrington, Jan. 14, 1759. 
He was bred to a farmer's life, making a good use of the limit- 
ed school privileges of that early day,and by reason of fine nat- 
ural abilities, energy and integrity, he achieved a rank unusu- 
al for one of narrow opportunities. He entered public 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 67 

life when but a youth, and throughout his career served 
town, state and county so faithfully, that he received the 
soubriquet of "Old Anstides." He served as a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war, was a Senator or Representative in 
the General Assembly of Rhode Island for 19 years from 
1787 to 1825, and was an Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Rhode Island from 1794 to 1837. 

Joshua Bicknell died in 1837, aged 79 years, and his widow. 
Amy Brown Bicknell, died in 1846, at the age of 84 years, 
2i months. Their children, of whom James was one, lived 
to the following ages : Joshua died of yellow fever, at Balize, 
British Honduras, aged 29; Jerusha lived to the age of 74 
years and 6 months ; Mary, the wife of Rev. Seth Chapin 
and mother of Dr. Joshua B. Chapin, formerly Commissioner 
of Public Schools of R. I., died at 82 ; Allen, the father of 
Thomas W. Bicknell, Commissioner of Public Schools of 
R. I., from 1869 to 1875, lived to the age of 83 3^ears and 4 
months ; Amy died at the age of 88 ; Elizabeth, who mar- 
ried Anson Viall of Seekonk, Mass., died at the age of 84 ; 
Joseph lived to the age of 83, and James, the last of the 
family of eight children, died at the age of 96 years and 10 
days. Excepting Joshua,' who died an accidental death of 
yellow fever, the average age of the seven children with 
their father and mother, Joshua and Amy, is eighty-three 
years and eight months. This is a partial record of a family 
in the seventh generation from the planting of the Bicknell 
family in Weymouth, Mass., by Zachary and Agnes in 1635. 

T. W. Bicknell. 

David Frothingham. — David Frothingham came to Sag 
Harbor, N. Y., somewhere about 1790 with his wife. He 
started a printing office and began the publication of 
Frothingham's Long Island Herald in 1791 — the first news- 
paper of Long Island. His wife's maiden name was Nancy 
Pell. Tradition in the family is that both were of Boston. 
In fact I have heard my grandmother, who was Hannah 
Frothingham, daughter of the above, say so ; but the Pell 
genealogy (Pelham Manor, N. Y.,) gives Joseph Pell born 
1740 died 1776, as the father of Nancy T. Pell, who married 
David Frothingham (?) Correspondence desired on the 
subject. 

Wm. Wallace Tooker. 

Sag Harbor, Long Island^ N. Y. 



68 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

The Oldest House in Connecticut. — What is probably 
the oldest house in Connecticut stands in a good state of 
preservation in the village of Guilford. The house stands on 
Whitfield street, the approach being a wide pathway across 
the broad lawn. Guilford, then called Menunkatuck, was 
settled in 1639 by a party from England, headed by Rev. 
Henry Whitfield, and the stone house was built in that year, 
so that it is now over 252 years old. The walls are of stone, 
some four feet in thickness, and plastered inside and out, nar- 
row fissures being left in them through which muskets were 
pointed at the redskins. The timbers and floor boards are of 
massive oak, hewn out with primitive tools. On one side is 
an immense chimney, built outside the walls, the fireplace 
being about ten feet wide and six feet high. The rooms are 
small and dark, owing to the deeply recessed and small win- 
dows, and the ceilings are scarcely seven feet high. The 
house has been somewhat modernized, the fissures in the 
walls being no longer visible, and the fireplace has been 
boarded over. 

Early Greenbackers in Rhode Island. — The follow- 
ing abstracts from the Salem Mercury are interesting. The 
first is from that paper of date Nov. 25, 1788. The item 
concerning Joseph Arnold, appeared in the Mercury July 
14, 1789. H. M. B. 

"Newport, Nov. 6. Last week sailed for Nova-Scotia, Miss 
Abigail Cole, of this town. This lady, by her industry and 
economy, had acquired a competency to support her through 
life, which she loaned in specie to Lodowick Updike, of 
Wickford, (a man of great landed interest) in expectation of 
receiving the interest for her support, in the like money ; but 
he taking advantage of the iniquitous Tender Law, tendered 
the vile trash of paper, as a discharge for the principal and 
interest of her specie demand. By this unjust conduct, he 
hath stript her of her all, and forced her to throw herself on 
her brother's bounty, in a foreign clime." 

"The Society of the Cincinnati of the State of Rhode Island, 
at a late meeting, unanimously resolved, that Joseph Arnold 
of Warwick, a member of said Society, be expelled, and that 
his name be erased from the list of the members, for making 
a late tender of the paper currency of that State, to discharge 
a specie demand." 



Queries. 



1. A Funeral Ring, 1775. — I have a gold finger ring of 
elaborate design, containing an amethyst and two brilliants, 
which contains the following inscription as part of the de- 
sign. ''Rev. J. Howe. OBB. 26 Ang. 1775 M. E. 29." 

If any of the readers of the Magazine have knowledge of 
the person to whom this inscription refers, they may be in- 
terested to know that such a ring is in existence, and I shall 
be pleased to communicate with tliem. H. S. H. 

2. Hollow AY Ancestry. — What was the maiden name 
of Penelope, the wife of Benjamin Holloway, of Westerl}^, 
R. I. ? They had the following children : 

I. Benjamin, born, Westerly, December 80, 1714. 
H. Experience, born. Westerly, July 4, 1716; died Jan. 
21, 1726. 

III. Joseph, born, Westerly, February 10, 1717. 

IV. Penelope, born, Westerl}^ January 12, 1719. 
V. William, born. Westerly, February 18, 1721. 

VI. Samuel, born. Westerly, April 3, 1723. 

Vli. Hannah, born. Westerly, December 7, 1724. 

Any information relating to this family will be gladly re- 
ceived. ** 

3. Rev. Moses Sweat. — Can any of the readers of this 
Magazine give inlormation concerning the Rev. Moses Sweat? 
In 1782-3 he was at Wakefield, N. H. For some reason his 
stay there was brief. He seems to have had a reputation 
more as a great Greek and Hebrew scholar. His home 
during the latter part of his life was at Sanford, Me., where 
he died in 1824, at the age of 70 years. VVhere and when 
was he ordained? and what is his historv previous to 1782. 

S. 



70 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

4. Brookline, N. H. The First Minister. — The 
first instance where the name of a "settled" minister is found, 
on the Brookline, New Hampshire, town records, is in 1781, 
when the Rev. Mr. Houston was "hired by the town to 
preach." How early was there a settled minister in that 
town? Information concerning the early ministers of Brook- 
line would be interesting reading. 

Chicago^ III. B. H. L. 

5. Armstrong — Halce. On the early records of Boston 
I find the marriage of Matthew Armstrong and Margaret 
Halce, by John Phillips, Esq., June 7, 1694. Are there au}^ 
descendants of this family now living ? 

Netv York. N. Y. J. H. A. 

6. Earle-Brayton. — ^Nathan Earle, son of Jonathan and 
Isabella {Buffington) Earle, born 1811, married k widow 
Brayton, and lived for many years in Tiverton, R. I. What 
was the maiden name of "the widow Brayton," and who was 
her first husband ? Earle. 

7. Windsor Prison, Vt. The Death of P. Fane. — 
I am much interested in Prison Government and wish to ob- 
tain some particulars of the death of one Fane, who was 
concerned, with several others, in an attempt to escape from 
Windsor Prison, Vt., some time in 1834. Who can give the 
particulars of the escape and the killing of the prisoners at 
the time referred to above. ' P. 

8. Indian Lands at Stonington, Conn. Where can 
be found the particulars concerning lands sold in Stonington, 
Conn., to James Avery and Thomas Leffingwell, in trust for 
the use of the Pequot Indians, in 1683. J. A. 

9. Douglas-Mattle. — Miss Caulkings, in her history 
of New London, p. 300, gives some information concerning 
William Douglas and his wife, Ann Mattle. He was of 
Ipswich, Mass., in 1641, and of Boston four years later. 
Miss Caulkings gives the date of his death as having oc- 
curred July 26 1682. Where can I find an account of the 
Douglass and Mattle families. Q. 



Editorial Notes. 



Memorial to John Robinson. — On July 4, 1891, the beautiful 
tablet, subscribed for by ministers and members of the Congrega- 
tional churches of the United States was unveiled at Leyden, 
Holland. The tablet is placed upon the walls of St. Peter's 
church, within which John Robinson was buried March -4, 1625. 
A parish venerable w.th age, worshiping in a beautiful church, at 
p^ac^i with itself and strong in religious and social influence, ob- 
served the day as befitting tlie occasion The most interesting 
part of ihe ceremony was at the naomsiut of unveiling, Miss Edith 
Palmer nerforraing this part. After the dedication prayer. Miss 
Palmer drew aside the veil, and disclos:^d. not the tablet, but the 
stars and stripes, flanked by the Dutch tricolor and the Union 
Jack. She raised first the Netherlands flas;, while the band 
played the Dutch national anthem. Then, to the strains of "The 
Star Spangled Banner," she drew aloft the American flag. As 
the band pla3'ed "God Save the Queen," the Union Jack was 
drawn aside, and the tablet, with its figjure of the "Mayflower" 
caniti into complete view, bearing the following inscription : 

In Memory of 
REV. JOHN ROBINSON, M. A., 

Pastor of the English Church worshiping over against 
this spot, A. D. 160U-1625, whence at his prompting 

went forth 

THE PILGRIM FATHERS 

to settle New F^ngland 

in 1G20. 



Buried under this house of worship, 4 Mar. 1625. 
Act. XLIX Years. 



In Memoria (sterna erit justtis. 

Erected by the National Council of the Congregational 
Churches of the Unite I States of America. 

A. D. 18i)L 

We present, as a frontispiece to this number, a view of the tab- 
let. The cut is one of a series illustratinor an article, "The start 
from Delfshaven," in the November number, 1891, of the New 
England Magazine, by Rev. Daniel Vac Pelt. 



72 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

New Hampshire and Rhode Island. — Two Old Newspa- 
PKRS. — We have before us two New England newspapers of recent 
(late — The New Hampshire Gazette, ''The oldest newspaper in 
America," and the Newport Mercury, "The oldest paper in 
America." New Hampshire and Rhode Island have, since early 
colonial times, traveled, as it were, hand in hand, in spite of the 
strip of mother earth belonging to the parent colony, which lies 
between them, and perhaps both have a right to publish the 
''oldest" newspaper in America. When John Clarke and his lit- 
tle band, in 1637, decided to leave Massachusetts for conscience 
sake, they went to New Hampshire, from which Colony, after a 
short stay, they came to Rhode Island. History does not record 
the fact that he left his impress among the people 'there, but it is, 
nevertheless, singular that since that time. New Hampshire and 
Rhode Island have been associated, more or less, in many impor- 
tant events- The boundary dispute between Connecticut andRhode 
Island, when brought before the council at Whitehall in 1723, after 
a controversy lasting nearly sixty years, came near beingsettled by 
joining the two disputing colonies with New Hampshire, and this 
was only prevented when their geographical position was made 
known. In 1771, when Gov. Winthrop wished to settle his newly 
acquired lands, he advertised exclusively in the Providence, R. I., 
newspapers, for Rhode Island families. During the war of "76," 
when the seacoast of Rhode Island w^as in danger. New Hamp- 
shire men hurried to the scene of action, and General Sullivan, 
himself a gallant soldier from the same colon}^, led the fight in the 
best fought battle of the Revolution. When Rhode Island's 
would-be Governor, in 1842, found himself overpowered, he fled to 
New Hampshire for protection. When Rhode Island, in 1861, 
organized her first regiment of cavalry. New Hampshire prompt- 
ly furnished four companies. To-day the citizens of New Hamp- 
shire and Rhode Island exchange places for rest and recupera- 
tion, while in Rhode Island waters the man-of-war New Hamp- 
shire receives naval recruits from all New England. But the two 
"oldest" newspapers — The New Hampshire Gazette, established 
in 1756, by Daniel Fowle, and the Newport Mercury, established 
in 1758, by James Franklin, stUl flourish. It may be interesting 
to add that the last named paper is edited and published by a 
New Hampshire man. We hope soon to present our readers with 
some interesting facts concerning these old newspapers. Mean- 
while, we hope that such of our readers who may have early 
copies, will inform us of the fact. 



GoRHAM, Maine Records. — It too frequently happens that 
some interested, yet "unauthorized" person, is allowed to exam- 
ine early town records at home. In many towns Town Clerks are 
prohibited by law from permitting the records to go out of their 



MAGASINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 73 

custody. This should be the law in every State. About twenty 
years ago, the officials of Gorham, Me., discovered that the first 
volume containing the earliest records, 1764 to 1815, was miss- 
ing. Every effort was made by individual search, and the town 
offered a liberal reward for the return of the lost records, but 
with »ut suceess. Recently the volume was returned. The 
simple fact that it came from Boston, is all that is known of 
its recovery. With the missing volume came two others, con- 
taining records of marriages, births and deaths of the town from 
1764 to 1822. It is not stated that the loss of the last mentioned 
volume was known, but it certainly shows carelessness on the part 
of some one. It is hoped that all of our New England towns will 
provide means for printing their old records and thus prevent the 
loss which sooner or later overtakes uncaredfor papers of this 
class. 

An Interesting series of papers, "Stories of Salem Witch- 
craft," by Winfield S. Nevins, is begun in the December New 
Enojland Mao-azine. The first article oives an account of the 
witchcraft cases in New England previous to 1692 ; the outbreak 
in Salem village ; the court and places of trial ; a full history of 
the trials of accused persons, and copious quotations from the 
remarkable testimony in the court files are given, and the article 
is embelished with many portraits and drawings now published for 
the first time, and made especiall}' for this series. The aiticle is 
particul-irly interesting at this time, as the one hundredth anni- 
versary of this remarkable delusion is approaching. 

The Public Schools of Boston date their origin almost as far 
back as the settlement of the tow^n. As early as the ''ISth of ye 
2d month, 1635," it is found, among other proceeduigs of a "gen- 
erall meeting upon publique notice," that ''Likewise it was then gen- 
erally agreed upon yt our brother Philemon Pumont shall be intreat- 
ed to become schoolmaster for the teaching: and nourterino- of chil- 
dren with us." A tractof land ''thirtie acres" was allotted to him 
"att agenerall meeting ye 14th of ye 10th month, 1635, at Muddy 
River." The grant was confirmed January 8, 1637. 

The Old "Constitution House," so-calh'd, in Windsor, Ver- 
mont, is in danger. A part of it has already been turned into a 
wheelright shop, and unless something is done soon Vermont will 
lose one of her oldest landmarks. It was in this house, in 1777, 
that the independence of the ''republic of Vermont" was declared 
by a convention attended by Joseph Bowker, Ttomas Chittenden, 
Dr. Jonas Fay and other patriots. 

The Centennial of American clockmaking is to be celebrated 
in Terryville, Connecticut, in 1893, and the memory of Eli Terry, 
who, in the beginning of the industry, founded the village that bears 
his name, is to be honored. 



Book Notes. 



Americans of Royal Descent. — The second edition of Mr. 
Browning's work, "Americans of Royal Descent," containing 
senealooies of American families whose descent is traced from 
ro3^ilty, is now ready. The arrangement of the pedigrees is the 
same as in the handsome edition privately printed in 1882-3, 
which has been added ^o and carefully revised to date. A num- 
ber of pedigrees of American families, whose lineage is traced to 
kings, which were not in the last edition, are inserted, thus making 
it still more interesting and valuable as a unique book of Ameri- 
can Genealogy. Orders for this work should be sent to Charles 
H. Browning, Admore P. O., Montgomery Co., Penn. 

The Colonial Furniture of New England. — This study of 
Domestic Furniture in use in the early history of New England, 
by Irving Whitall Lyon, will be a welcome addition to our public 
and private libraries. The author of this work has been many 
years a collector of rare old furniture, and a recognized authority 
in m.atters of this nature. He gives a history as complete and 
accurate as possible of the provincial pieces of furniture that were 
in use in New England from its settlement to the beginning of 
the present century. It does for New England what has been so 
successfully done on the same lines by writers in England and 
other European countries. The Illustrations are beautiful helio- 
types from photographs made under the author's personal super- 
vision during the past ten or fifteen years, representing examples 
of the best furniture drawn from several of the most noted col- 
lections. Price, $10. Boston: 1891. Houghton, Mifflin and 
Company. 

Old South Leaflets. — Several interesting and important new 
leaflets have just been added to the general series of Old South 
Leaflets, issued by the directors of the Old South Studies in His- 
tory, and published by D. C. Heath & Co., Boston. All of them 
are connected with the English Puritan period, and are of the 
highest value in the study of the development of our own political 
liberty and of our political system. They include the petition of 
Right, presented by Parliament to King Charles in 1628 ; the 
Grand Remonstrance ; the Solemn League and Covenant, which 
gave the name of "Covenanters" to the Scottish Protestants ; 
the Agreement of the People ; the Instrument of Government, 
under which Cromwell began his government ; and Cromwell's 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 75 

First Speech to his Parliament. These Old South Leaflets, fur- 
nishing these famous original documents, heretofore almost inac- 
cessible to the mass of the people, for the few cents covering their 
cost, are invaluable. There are now nearly thirty in this general 
series, and none of them are more important than the half-dozen 
Puritan/documents which are the latest additions. 

Studies in American History, by Mary Sheldon Barnes, A. 
B., and Earle Barnes, M. S. — To write a history of our country, 
with the idea of introducing it into our public schools, requires 
great skill and selection to make it a work of general interest. 
The very early times of any nation must in the order of things 
prove a more suitable object for the antiquary's labor than the 
historian's. Criticism stands now upon too solid foundations to 
accept of fable for history. The book before us goes back to 
first principles and gives us abstracts from the original records 
from which our history is made. It is indeed a work of reference 
as well as one worthy of being introduced in our public schools. 
Boston : 1891. D. C. Heath & Co. 

The Estabrook Genealogy is now ready. It contains 359 
pages, 10 portraits; names and brief biographies of 2015 de- 
scendants of Rev. Joseph and Thomas p]stabrook of Massachu- 
setts, 1660-1891 ; 822 of Thomas Easterbrooks of Rhode Island, 
1660-1891 ; 59 of John Esterbrook of Cornwall", England, 1732- 
1891; 26 of John Estabrook of Brattleboro, Vt., 1785-1891; 
62 of William Estabrook of Tiverton, England, 1765-1891; 206 
of Ellijah Estabrooks of Rhode Island. 1730-1891 : 15 of Isaac 
P^sterbrooks of Massachusetts, 1796-1891 ; 86 of Richard Esta- 
brooks of Vermont, 1791-1891 ; and a copy of the will of Richard 
Estabrok, dated Dec. 5, 1413. The edition is limited to 200 cop- 
ies, $3.00. William B. Estabrook. Ithaca, N. Y. 

The Battle of Gettysburg. — This neat little volume, one 
of the "Decisive events in American History" series, by Samuel 
Adams Drake, is the stor}' of one of the most important battles 
in the war of 1861-5, and told only as the author can tell it. In 
connection with the Rebellion one seldom thinks of a battle north 
of Mason and Dixon's line, but the battle of Gettysburg was 
nearer home. In a military point of view, Gettysburg must yield 
the palm to the battle of Chattanooga. On neither side was 
there great generalship displayed ; there were combinations. The 
profuse use of ammunition by the Confederates in appalling- 
cannonade, showed that they were staking everything on that 
battle ; their reckless assaults that th(^y were determined 
to carry the day, cost what it might, by main force. In this little 
book the reader can get a good idea of the battle without wading 
through a mass of documentary evidence with which most of the 
histories of our late war are filled. Price 50 cents. Boston : 
1891, Lee and Shepard. 



76 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

The Ladd Genealogy which includes the descendants of Dan- 
iel Ladd of Haverhill, Mass., Joseph Ladd of Portsmouth, R. I., 
John Ladd of Burlington, N. J., and John Ladd of Charles City 
County, Virginia, is now ready for delivery. This genealogy, 
which has occupied most of the spare time of the author for sev- 
eral years past, is well worth a place among the many large vol- 
umes of family history that have been published within a few 
years. 

The greater part of the book is devoted to the descendants of 
Daniel Ladd of Haverhill, who came over in the Mary and John 
in 1633-4. Daniel was at Ipswich in 1637, and at Salisbury in 
1639, from which place he removed to Haverhill and was one of 
the original settlers of that town. The maiden name of his wife 
is unknown. Their descendants are found chiefly in Northern New 
England. 

Joseph Ladd, who the author thinks was a younger brother of 
Daniel, was on the island of Rhode Island as early as 1644. His 
will, of date 1669, was recorded at Portsmouth, R.I. in 1683. 
Many of his descendants are found in Rhode Island and New York. 

John Ladd of Burlington, N. J., 1678, was the son of Nicholas 
Ladd of Swingfield, Kent County, England. He died in 1740. 
His descendants seem to have remained in New Jersey and Penn., 
as but few are recoided as having lived in other States. 

John Ladd of Virginia, 1673, was probably a relative of John of 
New Jersey ; the records of man}" of his descendants find a place 
in the book. 

Among the representative men in the Ladd family may be men- 
tioned Mr. Nathaniel Ladd, who was a prominent anti-slavery 
advocate as early as 1837, and Governor Herbert Warren 
Ladd, a grandson of Nathaniel and son of the author. Gov. Ladd 
has for several years been interested in the politics of Rhode 
Island and has been twice elected to the office he now holds, as 
chief magistrate of that commonwealth. Others of the family 
were Hor . George Washington Ladd, of Bangor, Maine, member 
of Congress 1879-1883; Prof. Sumner Ladd, of Minneapolis; 
Rev. Henry M. Ladd of Cleveland, Ohio; Hon. Charles R. Ladd 
of Springfield, Mass. ; and Hon. Edwin W. Ladd of Springfield, 
Mass. 

The edition consists of only 400 copies of 425 pages each ; 
is fully indexed, and printed on good paper. Persons who have 
not subscribed, should send their order at once to the author, 
Warren Ladd, 677 County street, New Bedford, Mass. Price 
per copy, $3.50. 



North. 



Ol 



ccoTTa rokkv 



VARLBOROUGW Oocii ^^ 



BILUINQU SATET" 




K)NGS POCK 



.^nftftN ar 



HEEEEBSI^X:^ 



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a) 

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Map of Newport, R. I., 1713, 



]V[aGAZINE OfJ\(EW ^NGLANDjflSTORY 

Vol 2. April, 1892. No, 2. 

The Streets of Newport, R. I. 



BY BENJAMIN B. ROWLAND. 




^^% HE following paper was compiled by the late Benja- 
W^-T mill B. Howlaiid, Esq., in 1869. Mr. Howland, then 
City Clerk of Newport, was much interested in the 
T early history of his native town. His official duties 
which led him to examine the old records, soon developed in 
a fondness for antiquarian studies. Many of the results of 
these studies he embodied in essays and addresses, which he 
read on different occasions, before the Newport Historical 
Society, and other associations, in which he was much inter- 
ested. The manuscript of the article here presented was de- 
posited, in August 1859, with an officer of tlie Historical 
Society to be read at some future date, but for some reason 
this was not done. Mr. Howland died October 21, 1877. 
The John Mumford Map, so called, was drawn in January, 
1712-13. It measures 15^X37 inches. In 1860 this map 
was mounted on cloth and preserved under glass and can now 
be seen at the office of the City Clerk. It was published, in 
1860, as a corner map by Mr. C. E. Hammett, Jr., in his 
"Map of Newport with apart of Middletown, R. I." To this 
article we have added notes where the names of streets have 
been chnnged since 1869. — [Ed. 



* * * * 



'ime, witli its noiseless step is continually changing the 
scene. The customs and manners of one generation give 



78 INIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

place to those that succeed them. Could the men of by -gone 
days revisit the places where they once dwelt, how strange 
would all things appear to them — they would be strangers in 
what was once their home. 

We recur in imagination to our town as it was first com- 
menced, with a house here and there surrounded b}^ the 
trees of the forest. 

The southerly and westerly parts of the town fronting on 
the harbor, where Thames street now is, was then an almost 
impenetrable swamp, which at first was considered so great 
an obstacle to overcome that our fathers thought of laying 
out the town near what is now called Easton's Beach ; but 
the rolling waves of the broad Atlantic caused them to build 
around a small stream of water, which passed through what 
is now Tanner street, and emptied into a creek which run up 
from the harbor, which still finds its way through that street, 
and under the jail, across under Thames street into the cove. 

The dwelling of Gov. Cocldington, which lately stood on 
the north side of Marlborough street, directly opposite the 
north end of Duke street, has given place to a modern build- 
ing. It was built on the north side of the creek, which at 
that time was of considerable width. This venerable relic, 
which had stood so many years, with its high, sharp roof, the 
upper story projecting in front, beyond the lower one, a spec- 
imen of the style of the olden time, is now numbered with 
the things that have passed away. Mr. Bull's memoir of 
Rhode Island, published a few years ago in the Rhode Island 
Republican,* contains an engraving which gives a correct view 
of its appearance, as it stood a short time since. While it 
was being taken down, one of the standards of the railing of 
the front flight of stairs was saved b}^ George Turner, Esq., 
and by him deposited in the northern cabinet of the Rhode 
Island Historical Society in Providence, which, with a win- 
dow sash of lead, with its small diamond shape glass, also in 

*Buirs Memoirs have never been published in seperate form. They 
were originally issued in the Rhode Island Republican, January, 1832, to 
December, 1839. Also Newport Mercury, January 7, 1854, to November 
23, i86r. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 79 

that cabinet, is most probably all that can be identified as 
once forming a part of that ancient structure, so intimately 
connected with many important events in the history of our 
town.* 

The dwellings of those days were sometimes two stories 
high in front, the roof running from the pitch to the rear, 
until it reached the lower story, and sometimes farther, until 
it nearly reached the ground. It was the fashion then, and 
for years after, to build massive stone or brick chimneys, 
which took up a large portion of the house, with a kitchen 
fire-place of such capacious width and depth as to take in a 
log and fore-sticks, four or five feet in length, leaving room 
enough in the corners for the servants and children to assem- 
ble within its ample dimensions for the purpose of warmth 
and rehearsing tales of Indian murders and cruelties, until 
their imaginations were so wrought upon that each was ready 
to start from his place with nervous terror at the least 
noise. We can in imagination see some venerable old negro 
in one of these chimney corners, seated on a block of wood, 
the bark of which was worn smooth by long use, smoking his 
black stub of a pipe, with an audience of children, black and 
white, attentively listening to the wonderful stories of this 
aged oracle. 

In the first house that was built in what is now Middle- 
town,! on this Island, its owner, James Barker, used to pre- 
pare a log of enormous length and circumference, which was 
so unwield}^ as to render it necessary to tackle a yoke of oxen 
to one end, the large old kitchen having two doors directly 
opposite each other, one at the north, the other at the south 
end of the room. He used to drive the oxen in at one door, 
dragging the log. When it was opposite the fire-place the 
oxen were taken off and driven out at the opposite door. 
The log was rolled into the fireplace, where it served for a 

*A piece of the corner-post of this house, together with a piece of tim- 
ber from the Bull house on Spring street (the oldest house now standing 
in the State) are among the treasures of the Newport Historical Society. 

tincorporated June i6, 1743, formerly part of Newport. 



80 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

back-log for some days ; when it was consumed tlie same pro- 
cess was gone tlirougli to replenish the fire. 

The inhabitants at first were mostly engaged in farming. 
As they increased in numbers they ventured at last along 
the shores in their little vessels, visiting the neighboring set- 
tlements, and by their commercial exchanges were laying 
the foundation of a more extensive trade, which in about 
eighty years had grown to that importance, and the town 
had so increased in size that it was deemed advisable to cause 
it to be surveyed and the streets named. The petition of 
John Hammett, the then Town Clerk, and a schoolmaster, 
praying for a vote of the town for that purpose, reads thus : 
"Whereas, it is a universal and orderly custom for all towns 
and places throughout the world, when grown to some con- 
siderable degree of maturity, by some general order to name 
the streets, lanes and alleys thereof, and this town having of 
late years been so prospered as to increase the number of 
buildings, the which is to the admiration of the neighboring 
towns, so that it is the metropolitan of the said government, 
and also a place of considerable commerce and trade, and 
yet, notwithstanding, to our great reproach, persons at a dis- 
tance are not capable to demonstrate when occasion requires, 
in what street in this town they dwell. And also, it being 
no small difficulty to the scriveners in obligatory writing to 
give such plain and ample demonstration of the bounds of 
lands and houses, bounding on any of the streets of this 
town." 

This petition was presented at a quarter meeting of the 
town holden the 8th of October, 1712, and thereupon it was 
voted that Mr. John Mumford, Surveyor, should take a draft 
of the Town and be paid for the same out of the Town 
Treasury, and that the Council of the town should name 
the streets, lanes and alleys. 

A copy of this plat dated the 3d of January, 1712-18, is 
now in the vault of the City Clerk's office, with the name 
of the streets thereon, as named by the Town Council. 

The onlj^ streets that then run easterly from what is now 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 81 

Spring street, was Griffin street, (now Touro street) and 

Mill street, the east ends of which were connected by Jews 

street.* This was all of the street now called East Touro 

street* that was then laid out. All north, east and south 

of these streets was pasture, meadow or woodland. From 

the south end of Jews street. Mill street run as now to the 

Ferry Wliai'f dock, which dock was called Billingsgate. It 

was also vacant west of what is now Spiing street, and all 

between Mill street and King street, now Fi-anklin street. 

What is now the southerly part of Spring street, was then a 

nameless country road, running northerly from Coggeshall's 

Neck to the head of King street, where it ended with a gate. 

All that was at that time called Spring street, was only from 

Griffin street to a little south of Mary street, and there ended. 

All north of Griffin street into Broad street was called Bull 

street. What was called Spring street no doubt was so 

named because of the spiing north of Nichols Hassard's 

stal)le, which spring was formerly open : afterwards it was 

covered with a broad stone, under the west side of wliich 

was an open space to dip Avater. 

Church street and Frank Luiie run east from Tliames 
street, a little be^^ond the east line of Clarke street, and 
there they ended. 

The country road from Coggeshall's Neck to King street 
is dotted on the plat from King street direct to Clai'ke street, 
by wliich it appears it was to be so laid out, but afterwards 
was ruu easterly so as to meet Spring street, which carried 
it across the head of Church street and Frank lane. 

Thames street extended from the head of the town south 
as far as Cannon street. From thence it is dotted on the 
plat to about where Gridley street now is — probably this part 
of Thames street was not cleared of the woods — from thence 
it was laid out to the south end to its present termination 
and there marked mile end. 

The streets running from Thames street to what is now 
Spring street, and are named on the map, beginning at the 
*Now (1892) liellevuc Avenue^ 



82 i\rAGAZ[Np: of new England hIvStory. 

south, are Young street, then the most southern cross street. 
Brewer street, Clifton street,* Cannon street. King street, 
Mill street, Frank Lane, Church street, Mary street, which last 
street extended easterly across Spring street, and Highstreetf 
to School street. From thence it is dotted into Griffin street, 
where it now terminates. A few years befoie the map Avas 
made, Mary street ended in Clarke street. 

Next north of Marv street was Ann street, now running^ 
on the south side of the mall in Washington Square, which 
street was no doubt named in compliment to the then reign- 
ing Queen. 

The dock at the foot of Franklin street was then called 
King's dock. 

A lot is platted on the map which extended from the cross 
street now in the rear of the State House along the north 
side of Ann street, as far west as Prison street, on which lot 
formerly stood a town school-house, under which was the 
printing office of the widow Franklin, who in her day print- 
ed a number of books and pamphlets. She printed Mr. Cal- 
lender's sermon preached in Newport to a society of young 
men on a Sabbath evening, January 8d, 1741-2. On tlie 
title page is, '^Newport, printed by the widow Franklin, 
under the Town School House." She also here published in 
1746, Mr. Callender's discourse occasioned by the death of 
the Rev. Nathaniel Clapp, pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Newport, wlio died the 80th of October, 1745. 

Mrs. Franklin was the widow of James Franklin, a brother 
of Doctor Franklin. He came from Massachusetts to New- 
port in 1732, and commenced printing a newspaper in this 
town called the Rhode Island Gazette, which, however, was 
soon given up. On the 12th of June, 1758, he issued the 
first number of the Newport Mercury, which after his death 
was printed by the widow of James Franklin. f This long- 

*Now Ann Street. 

tNow Division Street. 

Jin this Mr. Rowland is mistaken. The Mercury was established by 
James Franklin, Jr. James Franklin, Sr., died in 1735. After the death 
of her son in 1762, the ''widow Franklin," in connection with her son-in- 
law, Samuel Hall, continued the publication. The MercUj-y is now (1892) 
owned and edited by John P. Sanborn. Mr. Pratt died Sgpt- 10, 1880. 



. i 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

established sheet, which takes a place among the ancient 
newspapers of our country, is now conducted by Frederick 
A. Pratt, Esq. 

In 1710 the Town granted Mr. Gallaway liberty to teach a 
Latin School in tlie two small rooms of the Town School 
House. 

The Park House, and the one south of it, and the Gale 
House,* are now on the easterly end of the school lot, and 
the Mall extends over and beyond the remainder. On the 
north side of this lot was Queen street, from Broad street to 
"Queen 's Hive," where the Long Wharf now is. 

North of Queen street was River Lane, next north Marl- 
borough street, running as it now does from the then Marl- 
borough dock into Broad street. 

Next, Coddington street as it now is. Then Passage street, 

the name of which was recently changed to North Baptist 
street. 

Wanton street, as now, extended from Coddington street 
to Passage street. 

The street from Marlborouo-h street, now next west of the 
Methodist Chapel, and called Charles street, was so named 
ill compliment to Mv. Charles Feke ; at that time, as now, 
extended from Queen street to Passage street. That part 
of it south of Marlborouo'h street then l)ore the name of 
Puddle street. 

From tlie north side of Passage street, in continuation of 
what is now Charles street, a narrow street continued north 
called Smock AUev. 

On Thames street, north of ^'Queen's Hive," now Long 
Wharf, a wa}^ leading to the Cove was called Scott's folly. 
This is the passage way now north of the residence of [the 
late] Wm. C. Cozzens. 

Next north, was Shipright street, now the head of Bridge 
street, from which the cross street run northwesterly, now 
crossing the head of Elm street. This street had a name, 
but the map being torn it cannot be ascertained, nor can it 

*Residence of Hon. William P. Sheffield. 



84 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

be known how far it extended, probably not far, as there is 
no part of Easton's Point laid down on the map, and likely 
there were no streets then laid out in that part of the town. 

Broad street and Tanner* street extended from their junc- 
tion at the head of the town as now, Broad street termina- 
ting in what is now Washington Square, and Tanner street 
leading into Marlborough street near Broad street. 

The cross streets from Broad to Tanner street were School 
House Lane, now called Caleb Earl street. 

Next was Clark street, no doubt named after Dr. John 
Clarke, as his tract of land lay near by ; but this is now 
called Oak street. 

Next, Bright's Lane, named so after a Mr. Bright, who 
lived somewhere near it. This is now called Collins street. 
Then Ward's Lane, now Horn Lane. Then Tew's Lane, 
now Crop street. 

The cross streets from Bull street, now the north end of 
Spring street, were Bull's Gap into Broad street, the same as 
now, in front of the old house formerly Gov. Bull's. f 

Next, IJart's Lane, now in the rear of the State House, 
and Spring Lane, now between Hassard's stable and the 
Easton estate, in which lane is the town spring, once open, 
but now covered and the water raised with a pump. 

From the west end of Broad street, what is now a part of 
Farewell street — from Broad street as far north as the square 
east of the jail — was then called Bridge street. I suppose 
because the water in River Lane from Tanner street, ran 
across it to the cove, and was bridged over with stones. 
From thence, northerly to the head of Thames street, the 
name it then bore cannot be ascertained, the map being torn. 

River Lane, as at present, extended from the head of 
Marlborough street westerly by the north end of what was 
then Bridge street, along the south side of the square east of 
the jail, and across the north ends of Meeting street, Prison 

*"Broad street" and "Tanner street." have, since Mr. Rowland's 
time, been changed to Broadway and West Broadway, respectively. 

tThis street is now called Stone street. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 85 

street, Paddle street, now part of Charles street, and across 
Duke street to Thames street. This alley is now shut up 
below Charles street. The passages east and west of the 
prison lot are laid down on the map. 

Duke street ended as at present in Marlborough street. 

All north and west of Tanner street, and north of Thames 
street, was vacant ; as was also east of Broad street, as far 
south as Griffin street and east of Jews street, and south of 
Mill and east of Spring street. 

By a vote of the town in 1707, it appears that the compact 
part of the town was from the town pound at the head of 
Broad street, to Stephen Hookey's. The vote was, that so 
far as the houses are compact, which is from the town pound 
to Stephen Hookey's, tlie owners of land shall pave with 
stone a causewav six feet wide as far as their land extends. 

There used to be a Mr. Hookey who lived above Codding- 
ton street, on Thames street, a few years since. This might 
have been the same where Stephen Hookey lived. 

And here I would remark upon changing the names of 
streets. Many of the ancient names have been changed. 
Oak street, from Broad to Tanner street, no doubt was 
named for Dr. John Clarke*. Queen street, Ann street, and 
others have lost their original names. After we had achieved 
our independence, the people could not endure the names of 
King and Queen, cSjc. This feeling was so strong that the 
Wardens and Vestry of Trinity Ciiurch were waited upon 
by many of the inhabitants with a request to remove the 
royal crown from the s[)ire. This they wisely declined to do, 
but I presume nothing but its great height from the ground 
saved it from being torn from its position. 

The ancient names of the streets are associated with the 
liistor}'- of the past. Besides, it is more convenient, for 
where the original names of streets and places are unchanged, 
they serve as landmarks to fix the location of places and 
buildings. I would also remark that what is now by mis- 

*It is a little singular that none of our streets, or public buildings, are 
named for John Clarke, who was, to say the least, the most prominent 
man among our early sett'ers. 



86 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

take lettered "Giidley street," was named after a once prom- 
inent citizen of Newport, named John Gidley, who, as in- 
scribed on tlie stone that covers his remains in Trinity 
Churchyard, departed tliis life Sept. 30, 1744, aged 44 years ; 
^'he having received the citation for death by a violent ex- 
plosion of gunpowder eleven days before he expired." 

As the business of the town increased, and probably at the 
time when it was considered doubtful whether New York 
would ever overtake Newport in commercial prosperity, our 
wealthy citizens erected a number of elegant mansions — a 
few of them yet remain unaltered in style and appearance ; 
others have been modernized. Among those that still retain 
the form and structure of their day, is the Tillinghast house 
in Mill street, now the mansion of Gov. Gibbs ; the Vernon 
house in Clarke street ; the Champlin house in Mary street ; 
the Hunter house in Washington street ; the Brenton house 
in Thames street, at present the residence of Mr. Adam S. 
Coe* ; the Handy house in the lower part of Thames street ; 
the brick house in Thames street owned by J. R. Newton, 
formerly Malbone's ; the Redwood house, the late residence 
of S. Fowler Gardner ; the Gov. Wanton house, late owned 
by the widow Lawtou. This last, however has been mate- 
rially altered, and its appearance changed by lowering the 
front to the pavement for the purpose of stores. 

The brick liousef south of the Custom House in Thames 

street formei'ly the elegant mansion of Malbone, has been 
modernized and shorn of its ancient grandeur. 

Many commodious stores were built on the wharves south 
of the cove and on the Point. There was a handsome row 
of stores which extended from now Washington street, then 
Water street, towards the harbor, on the lot afterwards Gibbs' 
and Channing's shipyard, north of what was formerly the 
Barton estate,' late the residence of William Hunter. Tliese 

* The Tillinghast house, in Mill street, is now owned and occupied by 
Joseph Tuckernian, Esq Mr. H H. Swinburne until recently occupied 
the estate known as the '"Brenton House" on Thames street. 

tNow the property of Mr. Michael Cottrell. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HTSTORY. 87 

stores belonged to George Rome, and were standing some 
time after the Revolution. 

It was the fashion of the day, previous to the Revolution 
and for some time after, for the retail shops, many of which 
were one-story buildings, on each side of Thames street, for 
the window shutters to open horizontally ; the upper one 
raised and kept in its position by a stick, the lower one let 
down and kept on a level by an iron chain. On the lower 
shutter various articles were displayed for show. 

Various kinds of manufactures were early entered into by 
the business men of the place, and for many years these, 
with the commerce of the town, aided in its growth and 
added to its wealth. 

The manufacture of cordage was largely carried on. 
There were several ropewalks which all did a good busi- 
ness, and for many 3^ears supplied not only this town but 
many other places with cable and cordage. 

What was recently known as Brinley's rope-walk, was 
formerl}^ Mai bone's ; it stood at the head of Catharine street 
before that street was extended, and was on the north side 
of a driftway which led easterly from the east end of Catha- 
rine street. This driftway is now a part of Catharine street 
extended. 

On Blaskowitz' map of the town, made in 1777, is designa- 
ted a long one on the north side of Bowery street, which 
commenced near what is now East Touro street, but then a 
continuation of Jews street as far as Bowery street. This 
ropewalk extended from thence more than half way down 
to now Spring street, but then called South street. On an 
old pen and ink sketch, probably a copy of this map, it is 
marked "Malbone's ropewalk." 

There was one formerly owned by Deacon William Tilley 
adjoining the westerly side of the Jewish cemetery in Griffin, 
now Touro St., which extended northerly along what is now 
Kay street. This was taken down on opening Kay street. 
Another, also formerly Deacon Tilley 's, extended from the 
north side of Griffin street, just above the Whitfield estate. 



88 ]\IAGAZ1NE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOIIY. 

There was one on the northerly side of Tanner street and 
recently taken down by Mr. William Tew Tilley. The land 
on which it stood is thrown into a street opened by him, and 
named by Mr. Tilley, Callender Avenue, after the Rev. John 
Callender, formerly pastor of the First Baptist Church in 
Newport. The avenue extends from Tanner to Warner 
street. 

Another formerly stood on the east side of Farewell street, 
a little above Passage street; another stood on Long Lane 
west of the common burial place. 

Barker's ropewalk commenced at the head of Pope street 
and extended south along the west side of Spring street. 

Tew's more recently built, was on the east side of the 
street which runs south from the old Beach road, east of the 
Christopher Fiy estate. A part of this is yet standing. 

William Clagget* carried on the clock making business in 
Newport; he is said to have been a very superior workman, 
and Jiis clocks were highly considered and are to be found in 
many parts of our land. A number of them are in this town 
ill various families. He was in Newport as early as 1720 
certain ; how long before, I have no means at hand of ascer- 
taining. At that time he was a member of the Second Bap- 
tist Church. Owing to a controversy with that church, he 
afterwards joined the First Church, and was a member when 
it was under the pastoral cliarge of the Rev. John Callender. 
Mr. Clagget published a book in relation to this controversy 
entitled ^'A Looking Glass for Elder Clark and Elder Wight- 
man, &c.; it being a brief, but true relation of the cause and 
prosecution of the differences between the baptized church in 
Newport, under the pastoral care of James Clark and Daniel 
Wightman, and Jolm Rhodes, Capt. John Rogers, William 
Clagget, and several others that w^re members of the afore- 
said church." 

The distillery business was formerly carried on very ex- 
tensively. Previous to the Revolution there were twenty- 

*William Cla,a:get, died Oct. i8. 1749, aged 53 years. One of his clocks 
in good order, can be seen at the rooms of the Newport Historical Society. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 89 

two distilleries for the manufacture of New England Rum ; 
they were located, many of them, in what is now the cove 
above the Long Wharf, others on the wharves below. A 
brisk business was carried on in the importation of molasses 
from the West Indies, which was, after being run through 
the still, exported to Africa, to exchange for negroes. — Many 
of these were brought to Newport, and most of the principal 
families had a house full of them to take care of. 

It was for many years that the negroes annually elected a 
Governor, who was inducted into office with much ceremony. 
The smallest qualification for voting was a pig-stye, with at 
least one pig. The Governor had considerable power over 
the blacks, and was very serviceable to the whites in re- 
straining their servants from committing petty offences. 
'Since the Revolution the distilleries in operation were — 

Northam's, north of the Long Wharf. 

Gibb's, recently raised up and turned into a woolen mill. 

Clarke's used to stand on the lot where the Newport 
Steam Factory now is. 

Dixon & Deblois' was on Overing's wharf. 

Whitehorne's was on Thames, corner of Howard street. 

Rhodes and Cahoon's, was what is now the Brew House* 
on Brewery street. 

Bull's was in Bull street. 

At one time the manufacture of S[)erm Candles was car- 
ried on somewhat extensively by Charles Handj^, John Slo- 
cum and others. 

In early days it was the custom for the farmers to have 
their spinning and weaving done in their families. In most 
of the farm houses, and in some of those in town, a room was 
appropriated for weaving with a loom therein, and the house- 
Avives were busily employed mi spinning flax and wool. Tins 
continued for some time after the Revolution, and until 
spinning and weaving by machinery rendered it cheaper to 
purchase than manufacture. F"ormerly there were many who 

*Within a few years this "Brew House" has been turned into dwelb'ng 
houp-es. 



90 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

made a business of weaving, and those families that did not 
have a loom got their cloth woven by these weavers. About 
the year 1791 a number of looms were set up in the base- 
ment of the. State House, while the first floor was occupied by 
a company of play actors, under the management of Harper 
and Placide. I believe the noise of the looms interfered 
with the play goers, who after considerable of a contest and 
much newspaper discussion either bought off or drove off the 
weavers. In 1793 the upper part of the Brick Market* was 
fitted up for a theatre by Messrs. Harper & Placide. 

An unsuccessful attempt was made to manufacture Duck 
in this town, and a factory was built called the Duck factory. 
It stood in Warner street, and was built sometime in 1790, 
it stood on the lot South of the common burial ground. The 
building was taken down a few years since, and- the lot js 
now used by the proprietors as a burial place. 

In 1798 John Lyon & Son carried on the business of manu- 
facturing cotton and wool cards. They removed after a short 
time, from the town. While they carried on the business 
they employed a number of children to stick the teeth in the 
leather. They worked in the Watson house next vSouth of 
the City Hall. The school marms of those days were also 
employed in sticking the teeth, and thus eked out their 
means of support. 

From about 1800 to 1810 or 12, Thomas Vose carried on 
the sugar refining business, on Overing's wharf, in the South 
part of the town, in the building formerly used for the same 
business by Overing & Auchmuty. 

With the progress of time what a change has come over 
the usages of those early days of our ancient city. 

Some of us can remember when it was the custom in the 
days previous to, and for some time after the Revolutionary 
war, for the Squaws of the Narragansett tribe of Indians, a 
remnant of which, still linger in the town of Charlestown, to 
come to Newport with baskets of their manufacture for sale, 
and who were also provided with a bundle or two of flags or 

*Now City Hall. ~ " ~ ~~" 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 91 

rushes, for the purpose of bottoming chairs, and when they 
got a job, would seat themselves in the back yard of their 
employer, and new bottom or repair the chairs, for which, in 
addition to their pay, they were generally treated to break- 
fast or dinner, and a mug of cider. 

They generally dressed in a blanket or a man's great coat 
over their petticoats, and a man's felt hat on their head, with 
a tinsil band around the crown as an ornament. 

Men tailors sometimes went from house to house with 
their goose, shears and press-board, and made and mended 
the clothes of the men and boys of the f amil}^, for the sum- 
mer or winter season. Many now living can remember an old 
man, familiarly called Johnny Lassell, who thus carried on 
the business ; sitting in a chair with one leg crossed over 
his knee, he performed his work. Johnny was a short thick 
man, and dressed in a brown suit, his shirt ruffled at the 
bosom, which with his waistcoat and upper lip were plenti- 
fully strewed with Scotch snuff. 

There were manj^ other customs and observances in New- 
port that have passed away, such as the great Christmas 
back log, the Christmas candle that the mothers of those 
days prepared for the amusement of their youthful progeny ; 
and tlie Pope and the Devil, who once so conspicuously fig- 
ured in effigy through the streets of our ancient town, on the 
annual return of the 5th of November, when wooden door 
steps, rain water casks, Avashing tubs, and every article of 
wood that was moveable, were carefully taken within doors, 
for some days previous to that day so memorable in the his- 
of our English ancestors, to preserve them from making a 
part of the great collection of combustibles, which were 
gathered by the populace, for the purpose of a bonfire, in 
which these effigies of liis holiness, together with the arch 
enemy of mankind were destined to be consumed. 

At the close of the 18th and beoinnino" of the 19th cen- 
tury our town was fast recovering from the effects of the 
Revolutionary war, whicli had paralized her commerce and 
scattered her merchants, who had fled to less exposed places 



i 



92 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 

as tlic war was drawing on. The town of Providence as has 
been remarked '^repaid the debt she ow^ed to Newport for that 
protection afforded her citizens who in the time of King 
riiilip's Avar, came hei-e for an Asylum from the rage of the 
Indians," tliey in return affording a retreat to many of our 
people who stopped in Providence, many of whom made it 
their permanent abode, and by their enterprise added to the 
prosperity of that place. 

During the war our town suffered severely, the enemy had 
possession of it over a year, and left her public buildings in 
a ruinous condition. In the year of peace that followed 
they had been repaired. Business revived, once more her 
sliips and other vessels were busily employed in foreign com- 
merce and the coasting trade, and thus continued quite pros- 
perous up to the year of the long embargo. The town pre- 
sented a lively appearance, her wharves and stores hlled with 
merchandise. Many vessels were employed in the Russia 
trade, bringing home hemp, duck and iron and there was a 
large trade with the West India islands, the wharves were 
often full of molasses, sugar, rum, &c. Her enterprising 
merchants were among the first in the land, their credit stood 
fair in everj^ part of the commercial world. Among the 
most prominent was the house of Gibbs and Channing, who 
for a number of years were engaged in a prosperous business 
and who accumulated a large fortune, but the embargo and 
the war of 1812 was destructive to the commercial prosperi- 
ty of Newport, since then it has fast declined, mostly by 
reason that New York and Boston have monopolized the 
trade. During this transient prosperity the buildings in- 
jured by the British in the time of the Revolution had been 
repaired and the town had resumed its usual appearance ; 
her three steeples were to be seen pointing upwards from 
Trinity and the First and Second Congregational churches. 

The Old Stone Mill stood, not as at this time in a beau- 
tiful park, and surrounded with trees, and in the neighbor- 
hood of many elegant mansions, but in a vacant field, with 
but few houses on the north side of Mill street in its imme- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 98 

diate vicinity. The nearest houses on the south were those 
on Prospect Hill street. Pelham street above Spring street 
was not laid out until some years after, and all the buildings 
in that part of the street are of recent origin. Yet we can 
in idea throw around its ancient walls, forest trees and shrub- 
bery, and bring it to view as it once stood, secluded from 
observation, with here and there a house in the distance. 
How much speculation it has occasioned of late to endeavor 
to account for its erection. Those who are opposed to the 
belief that the intention of its builders, was nothing more 
than for a humble wind-mill, and determined that this ven- 
erable relic of antiquity shall not be so degraded, argue that 
its structure renders it preposterous to suppose that so much 
labor and ingenuity would have been wasted on a windmill, 
but that its well turned arches and its fair proportions plead 
for it a more dignified station. The novelist has taken pos- 
session of its walls for the accommodation of the beings of 
his creation, and we are authorized to say from the authority 
of the imaginative brain of the superstitious, that his satanic 
majesty has at times been within the circle of its pillars. 
Its history is obscure, and any one has a perfect right to 
throw around it the ideal of romance, and invest the old 
structure with all the mystery which a fertile imagination can 
invent. 

The Redwood Librarj^ stood on the brow of the hill, in 
its classic beaut}^ with here and there a dwelling house, or 
ropewalk and a wind-mill in its neighborhood, for until with- 
in a few years the dwelling houses did not extend, except a 
few scattered ones, eastward of Bellevue street. Then Pros- 
pect Hill, Mill, Church, and Griffin streets, were all that led 
from Spring street to Bellevue street. John street for some 
time after the Revolution, ended just above where the 
Constant Taber house stands, and butted against pasture and 
meadow lands, having a gate at the east end to let the cows 
in and out of the pasture. 

All the hill presented to the eye nothing but garden spots 
and green fields; to the south, all below Golden Hill street 
was the same. Dixon's lane* was then considered almost 
out of town. Then, as the genial spring returned to bless the 
earth, instead of splendid mansions as now, all east and 
south of Spring street was a verdant carpet, sprinkled with 
buttercups and dandelion blooms. 

*Dixon street. 



English Parish Registers, 

BY COLONEL J. L. VIVIAN, 

Autl^or of the |4erald's Visitations o? the Counties of Corn- 
wall, Devon and Dorset ; jVlarriage licenses of the 
Diocese of Exeter, &c., 8tc., <Stc. 




S I am frequently consulted by friends in New Eng- 
land on Genealogical subjects which require extensive 
^searches in our Parish Registers, a few words as to 
fcheir nature and condition may not be unacceptable to 
the readers of ''The Magazine of New England History." 

The value of these records is such that there is scarcely a 
claim to the Peerage, or heirship to property, on record, 
which has not been proved by them. 

Previous to the dissolution of the Monasteries, the Regis- 
ters of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials were kept by the 
Monks, and their ceasing to perform this office no doubt gave 
rise to the mandate in 1538 by Thomas Crumwell, after- 
wards Earl of Essex and Vica General, for the keeping of 
proper registers in every parish. Afterwards it was ordered 
that every minister at his institution should subscribe this 
protestation, ''I shall keepe the register booke according to 
the Queenes Majesties injunction." The Registers not being 
so regularly kept and preserved as was necessary, it was or- 
dained by the Archbishops and Clergy at Canterbury on the 
25th October, 1597, that parchment register books should be 
purchased at the expense of every parish for future use, into 
which should be transcribed the names of all those who had 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 95 

been baptized, married or buried previously, from the paper 
books, and that their correctness should be certified at the 
bottom of each page by the clerg}^ and church wardens, and 
a copy sent annuall}^, within one month after Easter, hj the 
respective church wardens to the Registry of the Diocese to 
be preserved in the Episcopal Archives. These regulations 
were approved by the Queen for both the provinces of Can- 
terbury and York, and confirmed by the 70th Ecclesiastical 
Canon of 1603. 

During the time of the civil wars great confusion arose in 
church affairs, and the Registers were neglected, irregularly 
kept, and, in many cases, entirely lost, the duty of keeping 
them being handed over to some village tradesman, whose 
chief recommendation was the zeal he had shown in the de- 
struction of the old register books. 

In 1644 an Act of Parliament was passed for the proper 
keeping of Parish Registers, and also again in 1653. Most 
of these have been lost, but in some parishes they are found 
in the old register book. The next notice of Parish Regis- 
ters arose out of a tax upon Baptisms, Marriages and Burials 
in 1694, 1695 and 1711, and in 1754 it was enacted that to 
legalize a marriage it must be solemnized in some church or 
chapel in which banns of marriage had been usually pub- 
lished, and so nicely was this interpreted that in 1781 the 
(■ourt of Kings Bench was compelled to declare a marriage 
void which had taken place in a chapel erected in 1765 ; this 
rendered it necessary to pass an Act of Parliament declaring 
all marriages previous to 1781 legal and valid in law, which 
was done. 

By Act 52, George III, c. 146, it was recited that it would 
greatly facilitate proof of pedigrees of persons claiming real 
or persr»nal estate, &;c., and enacted that new books with 
new forms should be used in all parishes after the 81st De- 
cember, 1812, the Baptisms, Marriages and Burials to be 
kept in separate books, and the usual copies to be sent an- 
nually to the Bishop's Registrar. Such is the history, in 
short, of our Parish Registers. 



96 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Now when we come to examine the manner in which the 
various enactments have been carried out, we come to a 
liistory of such wanton fanaticism, disgraceful carelessness, 
wilful neglect, and even theft, that space will not permit of a 
proper description of it in this article, and it will.be quite 
enough to say that in the present day such a state of things 
could not exist. 

When through the necessity of proving some link in a 
pedigree we come to an examination of a Parish Register, we 
are at once confronted with several unpleasant facts ; in 
the first place a very large number of parishes have no early 
registers, they are lost ; some begin about 1600, and in the 
large majority of cases there is a complete hiatus during the 
time of the Commonwealth. Some registers are entirely lost 
prior to the year 1660. But suppose a register to exist com- 
mencing as early as 1561, and complete down to the present 
day, (as in the case of one parish of which a complete copy 
is now before me) and one of your readers wishes to make 
a search therein, he no doubt thinks it is all plain sailing, he 
has only to go to the parson who will be delighted to receive 
him and produce his books at once ! and request the pleasure 
of his company to lunch or dinner I! and never mention the 
payment of a fee for tlie search !!! He will be speedily 
disillusioned. It is possible that, unless he has secured an 
appointment beforehand, he will be told that the parson has 
gone out and will probably not be back till late in the eve- 
ning, and that he has the keys with him; at all events noth- 
ing can be done until he returns ; of course he is disap- 
pointed and has had his journey for his trouble ; he has to 
return from whence lie came and arrange by letter a day on 
tvhich he can look at the register, and this the clergy will 
fix for their own convenience in nearly every case. Well, 
he at last gets at the desired book, and before he is allowed 
a sight, will be told : "of course you are aware that my fee is 
Is. for the first year and 6d. for every subsequent year," 
(Sjc, &c. Probably the searcher, or vv^ould-be searcher, does 
not know this, still it is the fact. This point got over by a 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 97 

compromise of some sort, say a guinea, more or less, as the 
search may extend, and he opens the book to find that the 
register does not commence until the very year after the date 
he wants, or that the period desired has disappeared from 
the book, or something else unpleasant, such as this ; the 
writing being of an age which he is quite unable to decipher, 
he appeals to the reverend individual who is keeping guard 
over him, and watching his every movement, so that he shall 
not mutilate or steal any portion of the volume, and very 
properly too, and asks him to interpret the characters which 
to his inexperienced eye appears to be Chaldee, or something 
equally unknown, and finds that he is quite as ignorant as 
himself upon the point, and consequently, there being no 
one else to whom he can refer, he teai-s himself away with- 
out procuring the information he came so far to obtain. In 
view of such a result, which is far from infrequent, my ad- 
vice is, procure the services of an expert, to whom these 
records are as simple printed characters. But we will as- 
sume thiit the books are o])ened aiul that the searcher is able 
to read the various liand writings and commences his searcli, 
with a clergyman able and willing to give him every possible 
assistance, his task becomes a [)leasure, and he is probably 
brought into contact with a man of education and intellect 
of the highest order, free fi'om a desire to finger fees, and 
only pleased at being able to help a stranger and give him 
information which he would be unable to obtain elsewhere. 

It is not generally known that registers of tlie dates of 
1538 and 1558 are sometimes to be met with, and there are 
many facts connected with these records wliich are equally 
unknown, as for instance, that unmarried ladies were gener- 
ally entitled ''Mistress" until the time of George IV. ; that 
it was not at all unusual to give the same Christian name to 
two or more sons or daughters, and that the baptism, mar- 
riage and burial of particular persons was frequently re- 
corded in other parish registers ; in some cases the same 
entry has been found in three different parish registers, leav- 
ing no immediate clue to which was the parish in which the 



08 ISIAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

actual ceremony took place. This is a fact well known to 
the experienced genealogist, but so little to the novice, that 
tlie discovery by an amateur that the burial of Lady Alice 
Godolphin on the 26th April, 1632, was to be found in two 
parish registers in two different counties, caused quite an ex- 
citement among quidnuncs which still to a small extent ex- 
ists, although the matter was explained clearly years since. 

As I am now near my limit, I will briefly show the value 
of a parish register by giving an entry from a Devon parish, 
Cornworthy. ''Mr. Henry Fortescue of Wood, in the parish 
of Woodleigh, Esquire, son of John Fortescue, Esquire of 
Priston, and Mrs. Susanna, daughter of Edward Harrys, Es- 
quire, were married the 5th day of June, 1586." Here the 
parentage of both parties is given, a most valuable fact for a 
pedigree. Marriages were, and are, by license from the 
Bishop, or after the publication of banns, and when the entry 
of the celebration did not give the names of the parents, it 
may be in many cases obtained from the marriage license reg- 
ister of the Diocese or Bann books. 

When it is found, as it will be in the great majority of 
cases, that the parish register is lost, or is so damaged 
through want of care as to be quite unreadable, reference 
should be made to the Registrar of the Diocese with whom 
the transcripts are supposed to be deposited. I say supposed 
because experience proves that there is scarcely a diocese to 
be found in which these valuable records have received the 
slightest attention. It is possible that a close search might 
enable one to find the transcript he required. I have found 
them to be of the greatest service, in more than one case, 
enabling me to prove a family pedigree by giving the record 
of over forty years of a parish register which was said to be 
lost, but which was found years afterwards in a butter shop, 
and restored to its proper position. 



Some Descendants of John Coggeshall, first 
President of the "Province of Providence 

Plantations." 



BY GEii. T. L. CASEY. 




^ ^OHN CoGGESH ALL from Essex Couiity,Eiig., wash. 1599, 
and came over in the "Lion," Sept. 16, 1632, with his 
wife ,and children, John, Anne and Joshua "He lived 
to tlie age of eight and forty years and was buried the 
27th of 9tli month, 1647" (Quaker Records). The date of his 
death was probably Nov. 2-3, 1617. He m. ]\Iary in Eng- 
land, who was b. ICOl, and "died Nov. 8, 1684 ie 80" (Quaker 
Records). His mother, Ann Coggeshall, residing at Castle 
Hedingham, England, made her will April 16, 1645, and 
mentions in it the children, John, Anne, Mary, Joshua, and 
James, of her son, John Coggeshall, "now residing in New 
Enoland." His ciiildren are believed to have been 

I. John2 b. about 1623, d. Oct. 1, 1708. m. (1), 
June 17, 1647, Elizabeth Baulston, from whom 
he \vas divorced May 22, 1655. m. (2) Dec. 
1655, Patience Throckmorton, who d. Sept. 7, 

1676. m. (3) about 1678, Mary who was 

})robably a widow, with a daughter "Mary"' 
who m. Josias^ Coggeshall of Joshua^ (See 
will of John^). 
IF. Anne^ b. about 1625, d. March 6, 1689, m. Nov. 

15, 1643, Peter ICaston of Nicholas. 
HI. Mary2 b. about 1625, was living 1645, probably 
in England. 

o 



'&' 



100 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

IV. Joslma2 b. about 1628, d. May 1, 1688. 
V. James^ b. about 1631, was living 1645, probably 
in England. 
VI. Hananiel^ bapt. May 3, 1635, d. young. 
VII. Waited b. Sept. 11, 1636, d. July 9, 1718, m. Dec. 
18, 1651, Daniel Gould of Jeremiah and Pris- 
cilla (Grover') Gould. He was b. 1625, and d 
March 26, 1716. 
VIII. Bediah2 bapt. July 30, 1637, d. young. 

Joshua^ Coggeshall (^John\') of Portsmouth, R. I., was 
b. in England about 1628 and d.«May 1,1688. He m. (1) 
Dec. 22, 1652, in the house of his brother-in-law Peter Easton 
"in the town of Newport," Joan West who was 21 years of 
age, and possibly the daughter of Matthew West, of Newport. 
She d. April 24, 1676 and he m. (2) June 22, 1677, Rebecca 
Russell of Hawkshead, in Lancashire, Eng. His will was 
dated July 13, 1687 and was proved June 15, 1688. Had by 
1st wife : 

I. Mary^ b. February, 1655. 
II. Joshua^ Jr., b. May, 1656, d. 1723, m. (1), May 

13, 1681, Sarah who d. March 20, 1697. 

m: (2), Aug. 26, 1697, Sarah who d. after 

1716. 

III. Johns b. Dec, 1659. 

IV. JosiasS b. Nov. 1662, d. Aug. 13, 1738, m. Mary 

alias Coggeshall, probably a stepdaughter of 
John^. 
V. DanieF b. April, 1665. 
VI. Humility^ b. Jan. 1670, d. after 1719, m. Ben- 
jamin Greene of John and Joan Greene of 
Quidnesett, R. I. 
VII. Calebs b. Dec. 17, 1672. 
VIII. Isaac^ b. — 

JohnS Coggeshall (Josliua\ John\) was b. Dec, 1659, 
and d. May 1, 1727. He lived in what is now Middletown, 
R. I. He m. Mary Stanton of John and Mary (Harndell) 



f 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 101 

Stanton. Slie was b. June 4, 1668 and d. May 11, 1747. 
Her will was dated March 4, 1740 and was proved June 1, 
1747. In it she mentions the following cliildren, excepting 
Caleb. Had : 

I. Mary* b. about 1687, m. Thomas Weaver of 

Thomas and Mary, of Newport. 
II. A dau* b. about 1689, m. Peleg Wood of New- 
port, R. I. 

III. Hannah* b. about 1692, d. 1763, m. Benjamin 

Weaver of Thomas and Mary of Newport, R. I. 

IV. Mercy* b. about 1695, m. Thomas Fish, of Dart. 

mouth, Mass. 

V. John* Jr. b. about 1697, m. Ann . Will dated 

Sept. 24, 1746. Freeman of Newport, 1718. 
VI. Joshua* b. about 1700. Freeman of Newport, 
R. L, 1722. 
VII. Avis* b. about 1702. 
VHI. Joseph* b. about 1704, was of Jamestown, R. I. 
IX. Humility* b. about 1707. 

X. Caleb* b. about 1709, d. befoi-e 1740, m. May 18, 
1782, Mercy Mitchell, of Richard and Eliza- 
beth. She was b. Aug. 17, 1712 and d. July 
30, 1744. 

Joseph* Coggeshall {John% JosJiua\ ffohn^,) was bom 
about 1704 and died 1743. He was made a freeman of New- 
port, R. I., February, 1728, but lived after 1735 in James- 
town. He m. (1) January 24, 1725, Amy Bull of Ephraim 
and Hannah (^Holoway^ Bull of South Kingstown, R. I. She 
was b. 1706 and d. in Newport, Oct. 20, 1728. On Sept. 14, 
1726, Joseph Coggeshall and Amy, his wife, a daughter of 
Ephraim Bull, late of Kingstown, gave a deed of lands. 
(South Kingstown, R. I. Records.) He m. (2) about 1735, 
Mary Carr of Caleb and Joanna {Slociim) Carr of James- 
town, R. I. She was born about 1706. Had by Amy ; 

I. Hannah^, b. October 20, 1725. 

Had by Mary : 



102 MAGAZFNE OB^ NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

II. Amy5, b. July 20, 1737, m. Sept. 2, 1756, Nicholas 
Underwood, of Jamestown, R. I., of Daniel 
and Mary. 
III. Caleb^ b. Dec. 6, 1740. 

Caleb^ Coggeshall (JoHe/pli^^ John% Joshia^^ Joh'n}^') of 
Newport, R. L, was b. Dec. 6, 1740, and d. Sept. 11, 1821 ; 
m. Nov. 14, 1762, Pliebe Card of Joseph and Mary ( Weeden) 
Card of Middletown, R. I. She was b. 1740, and d. Nov. 
26, 1832, £6 92. Had: 

I. Mary^ b. August 1, 1763, m Nov. 1788, Jeremiah 

Lawton. 
II. Abigail, b. April 20, 1767, m. Jan. 6, 1791, James 
Perry, of Newport, of Edward and Lydia 
(Macomber) Perry. She d. May 7, 1841. 

III. Joseph^ b. August, 1770. 

IV. ' Ann^, b. , m. Jan. 13, 1812, Henry Winch. 

Daniel-" Coggeshall {Joshua^, John\) was born April,- 
1665, and died May 17, 1717. ''He was buried at the Ports- 
mouth Meeting House." His will was proved June 10, 
1717. He married October 23, 1689, Mary Mory, of Joseph 
and Mary ( W^ibour} Mory of Jamestown, R. I. She was 
born Oct. 17, 1672, and died after 1724. Tlie marriage was 
performed by Edward Thurston, Assistant. In 1698 he was 
of the Town Council of Jamestown, R. L ; May, 1704, was 
Head Warden of Jamestown ; 1704-6 was Deputy from 
Jamestown; May, 1707, being of Kingstown, R. I., made 
complaint to the General Assembly of the Wardens of 
Jamestown ; Aug. 9, 1710, his ear-mark was recorded in 
Portsmouth; 1711 and 15 was Deputy from Portsmouth. 
Had : 

I. Mary*, b. Jamestown, Nov. 6, 1694, m. Feb. 8, 
1714, Samuel Clarke of Latham and Hannah 
( Wilhour) Clarke of Portsmoutli, R. I.. He 
was b. 1686 and d. Oct, J8, 1761. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 103 

11. Waite^ b. Jamestown, Dec. 13, 1696, d. June 28, 
1713. 

III. Joshua, Jr.^, b. Jamestown, Jan. 3, 1699, d. April 

30, 1735. Freeman of Portsmouth, May 3, 
1720, m. Mary , possibly Mary Spen- 
cer of William and Elizabeth Spencer of East 
Greenwich and N. Kingstown, R. I. Will 
dated Nov. 10, 1733, and proved May 12, 1735, 
s. p. 

IV. Ann*, b. Jamestown, June 14, 1701, d. after 1758 ; 

m. Jan. 13, 1717, Clark Rodman of Thomas 
and Hannah of Newport, R. I. He was b. 
March 10, 1698, and d. August 30, 1752. 
V. Daniel*, b. Jamestown, August 20, 1704. 
VI. Phebe*, b. Kingstown, Sept. 11, 1706, d. Dec. 23, 
1774, m. Feb. 1, 1721, Henry Bull of New- 
port, of Henry and Ann {Cole) Bull as his 
2d wife. He was b. Nov. 23, 1687, and died 
December 4, 1774. 
VII. Joseph*, b. Kingstown, Jan. 3, 1709, d. 1723 in his 

brother Josluia's house. 
Vni. Peleg*, b. Portsmouth, April 20, 1712, d. before 
1731, when inventories of the estates of Jo- 
seph and Peleg Coggeshall, ''infants," were 
returned by Joslma, their brotlier. 

Daniel* Coggeshall, (DanleP, Joshuci^, John^,) was born 
in Jamestown, Aug. 20, 1704, and died in East Greenwich, 
Nov. 24, 1775. He was m. in Friends meeting, July 7, 1726, 
to Mary Wanton of Michael and Mary (3Ieiv) Wanton of 
Scituate, Mass. She was born Oct. 4, 1707, and d. about 
1750. June, 1727, he was a fi-eeman of North Kingstown, 
and April 3, 1728, was admitted a freeman of the Colony 
from North Kingstown; 1733 was a Justice of the Peace 5 
Mav, 1742, was on a committee of the General Assembly for 
dividing the town of Newpoj-t ; May, 1746, was one of the 
trustees to manage the estate of Ninigret ; was an Assistant 



104 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



from North Kingstown 1742, 43, 44, 46, 48, 4*J, 50, 51, 52, 
53, 54, 57, 58, 62, 67. Had: 

I. Luceanna^ b. July 2, 1727, d. July 15, 1761 ; m. 
Dec. 20, 1753, Capt. Samuel Fry of Thomas 
of East Greenwich. Had : 

1. Wm.6 Fry, b. Oct. 6, 1754, d. Sept. 10, 1777. 

2. Mary6 Fry, b. Sept. 8, 1758. 

3. Dauiel« Fry, b. Dec. 19, 1760, d. Jan. 30, 1794. 
II. Mary^ b. June 19, 1729, d. March 11, 1747. 

in. Waited b. Dec. 20, 1730, m. March, 1751, James 
Gardiner of Ephraim and Penelope (JSldred) 
Gardiner of N. K. He was b. July 10, 1721, 
and d. in Wilmington, N. C. Had : 

"^ 1. DanieF Gardinei-, b. Dec. 19, 1751, d. Jan. 

10, 1755. 

2. MaryS Gardiner, b. Nov. 3, 1752. 

3. Waite^ Gardiner, b. Sept. 2, 1757. 

4. Ann^ Gardiner, b. March 9, 1759. 

5. James^ Gardiner, b. Sept. 14, 1762. 

6. Susanna^ Gardiner, b. Dec. 6, 1763. 

7. AbigaiP Gardiner, b. Sept. 7, 1766. 

8. Samuel Eldred^ Gardiner, b. Jan. 22, 1769. 

9. Wanton^ Gardiner, b. June 7, 1771. 

IV. Joseph^ b. 13, 1732. 

V. Hannah^, b. 1734, m. (1) 1753, Benjamin 

Sheffield, of Capt. Benjamin of Jamestown ; 
m. (2) about 1792, Lieut. Col. William. Stacey 
of Marietta, Ohio. Had by first husband : 

1. Phebe^ Sheffield, b. Oct. 5, 1754. 

2. Mary6 Sheffield, b. Sept. 25, 1757. 

3. Luceanna^ Sheffield, b. Dec. 22, 1761. 

VI. Abigail, b. Feb. 14, 1737, d. Sept. 14, 1HZ\ ; m. 
June 7, 1759, Silas Casey of Thomas and 
Comfort (^Langford) Casey of East Green- 
wich. 
VII. Ann^ b. 1T39; m, 1754, Ephraim Gardi- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 105 

ner of Ephraim and Penelope (Uldred) Gardi- 
ner, and d. without issue before her father. 

VIII. DanieP, b. 1741. 

IX. Peleg^ b. 1745, d. June, 1773, s. p. 

X. Mary^, b. 1747, m. John Howland of 

Jamestown, who d. Sept. 14, 1798. They had: 

1. Isaac^ Howland, b. . 

2. Daniel^ Howland, b. , m. Abby Cahoone. 

3. Mary^, Howland, b. , m. Benj. Gardiner. 

Joseph^ Coggeshall {Daniel'^, Daniel^, Joshua?^ John^,} 

was born 13, 1732 and lived in North Kingstown, R. I. In 

1758, he was appointed Commissary with rank of Captain of 
the troops raised by the Colon}" that year. Was appointed by 
General Assembly to take the census of North Kingstown in 
1776 and again in 1777. Was a Justice of the Peace in 1777. 
Was appointed by General Assembly in 1780 on a Committee 
to revise certain laws concerning the Currency. He m. 
January, 1758, Elizabeth Phillips. Had: 

[. Christopher^ b. Oct. 5, 1758. 

II. MicliaePb. Sept. 24, 1760. 

III. Sarah^ b. March 7, 1763, m. Lathrop Bentley. 
lY. Mary^ b. March 14, l'^65, m. Ebenezer Northup. 

V. — a son^ b. July 11, 1766. 
VI. PliiUips^b. March 7, 1770. 
VII. Ilaniiali^ b. Oct. 6, 1773, m. John Maguire. 

Danip:i/ Coggeshall (Dmilel'^, BanieP, Joshni^, John^,) 
of N. Kingstown and East Green wicli, R. I., was b. 1741 and 
d. January 6, 1807 at Belpre, Oliio. He m. about 1788, 

Elizabeth , and moved the next yearto Marietta, Ohio. 

He lived for a time in Farmers Castle where his name was 
spelled ''Cogswell". After the Indian War, 1790-95, he set- 
tled below tlie Little Hockhocking, wliere his descendants 
are said to reside. Had: 

I. John^ b. 

II. Abigail b. 

III. Peleg«b. 

IV. Job« b. 



V. DanieP b. 



Letter of Ben jaminWaterhouse to Joseph Banks, 

1816. 




J-^ HE following letter, in my possession, is, I think, 
-4!st\ worthy of publication, not only as having been writ- 
ten by an eminent son of Newport, R. I., but also on 
f account of the many interesting matters which it con- 
tains. Sir Joseph Banks, to whom the letter is addressed, 
was, at the time, Presideiit of the Royal Society. 

In 1768 Banks accompanied the expedition sent out by the 
British government, under Capt. Cook, in the ship 'Endeavour^ 
to observe the transit of Venus in the Pacific Ocean. The 
Endeavour was afterwards used in the merchant service, and. 
as probably many of your readers are aware, came into New- 
port, R. I., where, being found unseaworthy, she was con- 
demned and left to decay in our harbour. H. B. T. 

CambpvIdge, near Boston, 14th May, 1816. 
De4r Sir : 

I write this by Mr. John J. Appleton, who is of a respecta- 
ble family, an alumnus of this Universit}?- and a student of 
law. He has resided about two years at the Natchez on the 
banks of the Mississippi, the nile of our Egypt. As he is an 
intelligent young man, I mention this circumstance if you 
should wish to enquire of him anything relative to that won- 
derful country. We are indebted to the philosophical Jeffer- 
son for the possession of that vast and invaluable tract of 
country, destined to rise, by means of '^the father of rivers,'^ as 
the Indians call the Mississippi,to riches and grandeur beyond 
ordinary conceptions. ^ 

Our recent chivalry is gradually turning and running into 
the channels of improvements in agriculture, the arts, and 
mechanical invention; and if we should be blessed with 
peace a few years longer, we shall hardly wage war with any 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 107 

foreign power again, because they will not be disposed to 
I war with us. There is now an energy and enterprize pervad- 
ing this country that two years past was wasting itself in 
war. Our government is kindly protecting the savages, and 
gradually civilizing them. 

You have doubtless seen the journal of those persons whom 
the President of the United States sent by land to the 
Pacific Ocean. I lament that these sort of publications are 
not more common in England, instead of tliose worse than 
useless partial, party, political publications, written to ex- 
asperate our two nations, by spreading through the countr}^ 
''''hard words, jealousies and fears^ There is now a plan 
going forward to establish a literary and philosophical cor- 
respondence between England and America. My oidy fear 
is lest it should become a political, or party vehicle. Be that 
as it may, I have been assured that I shall be allowed to 
make use of it in conveying anything to, and from, my pliih)- 

sophical brethren in Britain. 

For the week past we have been all like the men of Galilee, 
"gazing up into Heaven" to see the spots in the Sun. As yet 
we know not what to make of them. In all sucli cases we 
turn our eyes for infoi-mation towards our elder brethren in 
Enghxnd. 

The National Government, besides providing a National 
University, is now establisliing two very complete astronomi- 
cal observatories, the one, it is supposed, will be built with 
the firmness of a castle, in Massachusetts, and the other, 
probably near New Orleans. The instruments and all the 
ap])aratus have been for several years making in London. To 
Jefferson and to Madison, two tiuly philosophical men, is 
science indebted for these national establishments. I am 
grieved to see by British publications, the erroneous opinions 
prcA^'alent in England of the last named personage. With all 
the endearing viitues of private life and spotless integrity, 
J\Ir. Madison is, like Jefferson, an ornament to science. 

With an high degree of respect, 

I am your obt. ser'vt. 

Benjamin Waterhouse. 
Sir Jos. Banks, Bart. 



Letter of General Greene to John Collins, 1783. 



CONTRIBUTED BY HENRY E. TURNER, M. D. 




HIS letter of General Greene, addressed to Hon. John 
Collins, of date, April 22d., 1783, is very interesting 
and characteristic; expressive, at once, of the high 
tone of sentiments and the luminous views of public 
matters, peculiar to the man and of the feelings of exulta- 
tion and profound satisfaction, that then pervaded that por- 
tion of the community, whose patriotism and trust in Divine 
Providence had sustained them through the long and arduous 
struggle against obstacles and discouragements which seemed 
almost unsurmountable. 

At this time, Mr. Collins had been a delegate from Rhode 
Island for five years, from 1778, and was Governor of Rhode 
Island, from 1786 to 1790. He was a resident of Newport, 
and son of Samuel Collins, of that town. Nathaniel Greene, 
the father of General Nathaniel, married for his third wife, 
Mary Collins, the sister of Gov. John, and widow of John 
Rodman, of South Kingston, of whom, of course, General 
Greene was a stepson. 

The Headquarters from which the letter emanated was 
probably near Charleston, S. C. It is believed that it 
has never before been published. 

Headquarters, April 22, 1783. 

Dear Sir: 

I am happy to have it in my power to salute you upon 
the returning smiles of peace ; and to the complete establish- 
ment of our independence. As we begun so we have ended ; 
steady to our course, faithful and just to our friends. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOilY. 109 

I begin to want to see my native land and old acquaint- 
ances. I feel for Rhode Island what I cannot for any other 
spot on earth. What is it that recalls this attachment ; and 
how is [it] that neitlier time nor change of place can alter its 
steady operation. Providence must have intended in the 
original constitution of the human mind that men should be 
local in their views and limetted in their politicks. Society 
could not exist without it, and the struggles which happen 
from this temper serve to aninate the views of mankind and 
purge off the dissocial passions. Without it Societ}^ would 
be a dead calm, and left uninteresting. But as nature appears 
more pleasing under a gentle form after an elementary strife, 
so in society after political convultions the blessings of peace 
are most delightful. America after this seven years war will 
relish peace like a new mistrey, adorned with every charm- 
But whether she will cultivate the proper measures for pre- 
serving it is a matter to be doubted. The selfish and the 
social principles, have the same operation in political as in 
private life. When a man becomes too selfish he is despised, 
and when too social he is ruined. A happy medium is best 
calculated for human happiness. It is equally so in politicks, 
we should be neither too local in general in our policy, both 
defeat the object in view and lead from the high road of 
political happiness. If the States don't give constitutional 
support to Congress our Government cannot stand. New 
convulsions must and will take place, and it is said the 
weakest always goes by the walls. I wish interest may not 
* * too much the features of our national character. I 
don't mean in Congress, but the particular states ; and I wish 
that this active principle ma}' not operate too independently 
of justice and honor. I hope it will not be the case, but 
where avarice governs, meanness always prevails. More 
attention is necessary to preserve our dignity than to pro- 
mote our wealth. Commei-ce will inspire industry, the 
pleasures of luxury will enliven it, and wealth and opulence 
must follow. Every man is engaged in this, all have one 
common interest ; but the guardians of National dignity are 



110 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

but few and often under strong temptations to betray it to 
tbe popular cry. In free governments nothing is more diffi- 
cult than to support a national character for honor and in- 
tegrity. Men are apt to be influenced by the present, regard- 
less of the future. Indeed, my dear friend, I have much to 
fear that this will be our unhappy situation. A rich scoun- 
drel is just as pleasing to me, as a nation without honor. I 
despise the first, so I do the last. And if I did not think we 
should support our character of justice and candor, I should 
almost lament having offered myself a willing sacrifice in 
support of my country's rights. But more of this when we 
meet. | 

Since the receipt of your letter I have had no opportunity j 
to learn anything concerning your interest in Georgia. It is | 
highly probable the gentlemen you mention are gone with 
the enemy; all that part of the country has been laid in ruins, 
and long under the power of the enemy. - | 

Congress recommended to the several states to settle with 
their own officers. Will Rhode Island acknowledo-e me as 
one of hers. If she will, I should be glad to have a settle" 
ment, and if the state is not as poor as I am, I should be glad 
to get some advance. I have drawn no pay since 77, and 
you may well suppose my friends are tired of lending me 
money. 

The Southern States have voted me an interest, but it will 
be a long time before I can make it profitable, either by sale 
or improvement. 

Mrs. Greene joins me in affectionate compliments to you 
and your family, and I beg you will communicate our best 
wishes to Mrs. Collins and other friends in Rhode Island. 

Yours Sincerely, 

Nathaniel Greene. 
The Honble 

John Collins, esq. 



Search for the Grave of the Mother of Hookers. 




MONG the grand old fathers of New England, Rev. 
Thomas Hooker holds a prominent place. While 
nothing is known of his origin and ancestry, he has 
left his impress upon American history, and his de- 
scendants have held high and honored positions among the 
noted ones of our land. 

He left two sons. The eldest returned to England, was 
educated at Oxford, took orders in the established church, 
married and had one daughter who died unmarried. 

The younger son. Rev. Samuel Hooker, married a daugh- 
ter of Capt. Thomas VVillett, and from her sons come all 
Hookers who are descended from Rev. Thomas Hooker, and 
for this reason she has been stvled *'The Mother of Hookers." 
She survived her husband, but all record of the time and 
place of her deatli and burial had been lost. 

After the Revolutionary war many of her descendants be- 
came interested in this question, and search was made for 
some information regarding her death, without, however, at- 
taining any satisfactory results. 

Sixty years ago a young lad listening to the discussions 
among her descendants and the stories of unsuccessful search 
whicli they told to each other, became so impressed with the 
earnest efforts that were tlien made to find some record of 
the time and place of her death, that it ever remained promi- 
nently in his mind, and it became a fixed determination with 
him to continue the search for that grave, whenever fortune 
favored him with the opportunity to do so. 

The years rolled on, and until 1886 such opportunity never 
presented itself. In that year the appointed time had come, 
and promptly the search began, one after another clue was 
followed, until all seemed to lead to Norwalk, Conn., and 
there the searcher arrived in September. 

It was useless to look there for records, for in the burning 
of the town by the British in the Revolutionary war, the 
church and tlie records had been destroyed. It was useless 
to ask about the death and burial of an aged woman, which 



112 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

luid occurred a hundred and fifty years ago, but Rev. Ste- 
phen Buckingham had married her daughter, and he had 
been a noted man in the history of the town, and surely some 
one could point out his grave, and this other grave, if in that 
region, would most probably be in close proximity to that of 
tlie Rev. gentleman and his wife, but inquiry soon developed 
the fact that no one really knew where Rev. Stephen Buck- 
ingham and his wife were buried. 

Upon consultation with Judge Selleck, he, while disclaim- 
ing any actual knowledge upon the matter, gave good rea- 
sons for believing that these graves were in a little old burial 
ground about two miles distant from the town, and there it 
was determined the search should be made. 

A gentle rain had commenced, and with fear as to what 
the next day's conditions might be, the hotel was sought for 
the night. All night long the gentle patter of the rain con- 
tinued, and in the morning the heavy clouds and steady rain- 
fall seemed to preclude the possibility of continuing the 
search, and with expressions of disappointment and regret, 
preparations were made to return to New York and defer the 
search until some future time, but here the clerk of the hotel, 
who had become quite interested in the matter, came with 
prompt assistance. Soon a pair of rubber boots were bor- 
rowed from a carriage washer at a neighboring stable, a rub- 
ber coat too was procured, a team and driver were hired from 
the stable, and regardless of the pattering rain, the journey 
to the old burial ground was made. The place was soon 
reached, and stepping carefully in the sodden and tangled 
grass the search commenced. 

Old crumbling stones, with half effaced inscriptions, were 
carefully examined, and in this way nearly all the ground 
had been gone over without success, when a bit of stone was 
felt in the grass underfoot. Down upon knees and pulling 
away the grass, fragment after fragment of a broken head- 
stone was found, and when these pieces were laid together, 
the inscription was deciphered, and it was found to be the 
stone which had marked the grave of Rev. Stephen Buck- 
ingham. Here then was partial success, and if that other 
grave were in this place, it was undoubtedly near at hand. 
On hands and knees, oblivious of the falling rain, the search 
in the tangled grass was continued, and soon a small stone 
scarce as high as the surrounding grass was found. Clearing 
away the encumbering vegetation, this stone was found to 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 113 

be the top of a headstone which had been broken off and re- 
set in the ground. Upon it were name, age, and date of 
death. It was the grave of the Mother of Hookers. The 
search of a centur}^ had ended in success. War's conflagra- 
tion had destroyed the records, and that bit of broken stone 
was all that was left to tell the story. 

Back to town and thence to New York, and then the news 
was sent far and wide among the descendants, and soon in 
response came back the demand that the grave should be 
marked so that it should not ao^ain be lost. Consultation 
was had with a few descendants who were conveniently near 
at hand, and it was decided that the grave should be marked 
by a plain, substantial stone, not too costly, and on which 
no attention at showiness should be made, but permanency 
should be the important object. 

Circulars were prepared and sent to well known descend- 
ants, and soon from far-away Calif ornia came most encourag- 
ing response. Slowly the fund increased, until at last the 
object was accomplished, and a head-stone at the grave of 
the Mother of Hookers was erected, containing the following 
inscription : 

Upon the froiit is inscribed : 

MARY WILLETT, 

Daughter of Capt. Thomas Willett, who was 
THE FiusT Mayor of the City of New York. 

Wife of Rev. Samuel Hooker of Farmington, 

Conn. 

From her sons come all Hookers who are 

DESCENDED FROM ReV. ThOMAS HoOKER, FiRST SeTTLER 

OF Hartford, Conn. 

Born at Plymouth, Mass., Novemrer IOth, 1 637. 
Married at Plymouth, Mass., Sept. 2'2d, 1658. 
Died at Norwalk, Conn-, June 24th, 1712. 



This stone is erected by her Descendants. 

181)0. 

Upon the back of the stone is inscribed: 

Near here are buried Rev. Stephen Buckingham 
AND HIS Wife Sarah Hooker, Daughter of Rev. 
Samuel and Mary W. Hooker, also 

JosiAH Hooker and his Wife Hannah, he a 
Great Grandson of Rev. Samuel and Mary W. 
Hooker. 



The Genealogists of Nantucket, 



BY O. P. ALLEN, PALMER, MASS. 



HE Island of Nantucket, which has been the cradle 
M^ home of so many noted and worthy people, is most 
^%3 J fortunate in having such a goodly number of men 
^^ and women who have been willing to devote the best 
part of their lives to the work of treasuring up the family 
lines of her sons and daughters. One of the first who took 
a special interest in the subject of genealogy was Benjamin 
Franklin Folger. He was a native of the Island, and was 
born April 11, 1777, and died March 3, 1859. He never 
married but lived a retired life, was shy of strangers, yet 
fond of the company of those who were fortunate enough 
to gain his confidence. He had a wonderful memory and 
became a "walking dictionary" of Island genealogy. He 
committed little or nothing to paper. But fortunately there 
were those who had the faculty of drawing from him his 
store of information, and placing it on record, and thus was 
laid the foundation of Several of the genealogies of Nantuck- 
et. Mrs. Eliza Barney, mother of Joseph S. Barney, Esq., 
of Nantucket, was born in 1802 and died in 1888. She be- 
came interested in the subject of genealogy, arid having 
formed the acquaintance of Mr, Folger, in time drew from 
him much of his accumulated wealth of genealogical infor- 
mation. She was a lady of leisure, had a love for the work 
and devoted 40 years to the elaboration of her self-imposed 
task. Her work comprised six bound volumes of mss., 
which are in the possession of her daughter, Mrs. Burgess. 

Mrs. Eliza Pollard, sister of the late Frederic Sanford, was 
another lady possessing the taste, means and leisure for 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 115 

genealogical research. She also devoted the best part of her 
life to the work of perfecting as far as possible, the family 
trees of the Island. She left as a legacy four large folio 
volumes, closely written with her own hand, embracing a 
very full and complete list. Her work is to be placed in 
the Athangeum of Nantucket for reference. Allen Cofhn, 
Esq., the Island lawyer, has published an account of his an- 
cestor Tristram Coffin, with some account of his descendants 
for several generations, showing what he could and ought to 
do for his family line. Mr. Wm. B. Starbuck, the genial 
collector of Nantucket has made a careful collection, very 
full and complete, of a number of the prominent fami- 
lies, gathered mostly from the loose papers of the late 
Charles G. Coffin. Mr. Philip Macy has, it is said, the most 
complete necrology of the Island, from its settlement to the 
present time. There are others also who are interested in 
family history. All the collections named are a credit to 
those who wrote them for the benefit of posterity, but having 
carefully examiiied them all, the writer must in all candor 
give it as his opinion that the late William C. Folger has 
left the most complete and satisfactory genealogy of Nan- 
tucket, and this statement is no discredit to the othei'S. Mr. 
Folger was born Juiie 8. 1(S06. on the Island. After gaining 
his education, he taught school there and later, on the Cape 
and in Ohio. He was also a land surveyor for 50 vears. He 
commenced the work of gene ilogical research some 50 years 
ago and pursued it until his death. He gatliered his mate_ 
rials first from his relative, B. K. Folger. then from the pub- 
lic records, from family history and old Bibles, and by cor- 
respondence ever3'where. He devoted the best energies of 
his life to the service. He wa^ (piite an aid to Mr. Savage in 
compiling his Genealogical Dictionary, and to others en- 
gaged in similar work, but his labor was mostly a labor 
of love, for he obtained little for what lie performed save 
in the line of family cha rts. He has left a worthy monu- 
ment which should be cared for and preserved. If possible 
it should be published for the benefit of the public, for it is a 



116 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

perfect m'nie for genealogical students. His work fills 10 
volumes of niss., containing records, most of them complete, 
of families of Nantucket. TI13 vviiter spent several weeks, 
during the past season, with the genial author of this 
valuable work and knows whereof he speaks, and im- 
proves this opportunity to acknowledge his indebtedness to 
him, for material in the preparation of a genealogy of his 
own family. 

Mr. Folger died at Nantucket, Nov. 10, 1891, in his 86th 
ye.ar, retaining his memory and faculties to the last. Peace 
to his ashes and honor to his name. 

Below is given a list of families comprised in the 10 vol- 
umes. When more than one page is devoted to any family, 
the number is indicated by a figure following the name : 

Adams, Abrahams, Addington, Allen, (10), Alley, (4), 
Arthur, (3), Austin, (4), Andrews, (3), Aldrich, Ames, 2), 
Atken, Atwood, Allison, Aikens, Ave ry. Archer, Averell, 
Appleton, Anthony, Atkins, Annab3U, Barney, (8), Bates, 
Backus, Beebe, Barlow, Baldwin, Buxton, Bliss, Bartholo- 
mew, Brewer, Burgess, Bodfish, Beard, (2), Barrett, ,3), 
Brook, (5), Bailey (3), Baxter, (2), Baker, (4), 'Barker? 
(5), Bartlett, (2), Block, (2), Briggs, (2), Brayton, Bur- 
dett, (2), Belded, Buck, Buff, Burdick, Bease, Button, 
Blackneel, Blackmer, Brewster, Butter, Burns, Boardman, 
Burringer, Bassett, Blackwell, Betts, Breard, Brill, Bee, Bur- 
rell, Beekman, Bockett, Burnell, Bowen, Brown, (10), 
Brooks, (2), Bennett, (2), Buckley, Barnard, (28), Bun- 
ker, (50), Coffin, (108), Coleman, (29), Chase, (28), 
Clark, (13), Codd, Caleff,' Cortland, Comeslech, Chapman, 
Coon, Childs, Cook, Cornell, Cooper, Carpenter, Crook, 
Coker, Case, Creasey, Capron, Cormish, Crowell, Covel, Cog- 
geshall, (3), Clasby, (10), Clasly, (37), Cathcart, (4), 
Colesworthy, (2), Colcord, (2), Cobb, Cabler, (2) , Chad- 
wick, (6), Cory, (3), Cottle, (3), Carr, Cartwright, (7) 
Clisly, (2), Crocker, (2), Cash, (2), Christian, (3), Cush- 
man, (2), Childs, Caswell, Church, Carnned, Churchill, 
Clapp, Calloway, Cotton, Chubbuck, Center, Cushing, Cure, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 117 

Cainess, Camon, Colburn, Congdon, Comstock, Coombs, 
Collins, Colwell, Casey, Dykes, Doaiie, Dixon, Draper, 
Daws, Davison, Day, Dawson, Davenport, Dayton, Delano, 
Dawns, Donovon, Darling, Derrick, Dame, Dillingham, De- 
fruz, Daylas, Drake, Dinghan, Daw, Daggett, (2), Davis 
(3), Drew, (2), Dunham, (4), Easton, (7), Ellis, (9), 
Edwards, Elkins, (2), Emmett, Eldredge, Enos, Ecles, 
Evans, Emory, Elliot, Ewer, Earl, Fairweather, Filmore, 
Frost, Fosdick, (3) , Francis, Frothingham, Franklin, Fitz- 
gerald (3), Freeborn, Folsom, Foster, Field, Farris, Fish, 
Fay, French, Friend, Freeman, Furney, Finn, Ferrell, 
Folger, (54), Fanning, Fitch, (4), Fisher, (11), Fuller, 
(2), Gager, Goodsell, Goldsmith, Goddard, Gillespie, Green- 
law, Godfrey, Gifford, Gibbs, Garfield, Gould, Gibson, Good- 
rich, Gurell, Geston, Googins, Gurney, Goodman, Glazier, 
Getchell, Glover, Grew, Guber, Grost, Guffilks, Goodspeed, 
Gray, Gaines, Gorham, (7), Garduer, (54), Giles, (2), 
Gwinn, (2), Greene, (3), Hart, Hoi way, Horsford, Hodge, 
Heath, Hovey, Halker, Haywood, Houghton, Hoffman, Haw- 
kins, Herriiy, Hutchinson, H;itliaway, Hubbard, Hurford, 
Hurd, Hendricks, Haynes, Harcox, Howard, Hamilton, 
Hobsic, Hi)wland, Harlowe, Hedge, Hauimoiid, Horsefield, 
Hinckley, Hunter, Hillmin, Harris, Hovey, Hoag, Hall, 
Hayden, Handy, Hatch, Haggerty, Hause, Hull, Hoolam, 
Higgins, Harps, Harper, Harlow, Holden, Howe, Hammett, 
Hopkins, Haxens, Holmes (4), Hussey, (34), Isham, Iiiott, 
Innes, Imbert, Jenks, Joy, (6), Jay, Jacinth, Jenkins, (10), 
Johnson, (2), Jones, (4), James, (4), Keeiie, Kidder, Kel- 
ley, Kuights, King, Kellogg, Kendricks, Kimball, Knowles, 
Loing, Luce (4), Lamb, Loom, Lumbert, Law, Lawrence, (3), 
Lester, Libert, Langdon, Leverett, Lefford, Lesson, Lothrop, 
Lewis, Lovell, Linch, Loan, Marshall, (6), Macy, (60). 
Swain, (.6 2), Starbuck, (28), Samson, (5), Worth, (30.) 



Abstracts from the Friends Records, Portsmouth, 

R. I. 



ANTHONY. 




HE Friends records of Portsmouth, R. T., contain more 
items for the student of family history, than the 
records of the three towns on the island of Rhode 
^ Island combined. They date from about 1650 and 
consist of Marriages, Births and Deaths of members of that 
faith from Newport, Portsmouth, Middletown, Tiverton, Lit- 
tle Compton, Dartmouth, Swanzey, and many other towns in 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 

It is proposed to give abstracts from these records relative 
to prominent families. The first to be noticed will be the 
Anthony family. Austin in his Genealogical Dictionary of 
Rhode Island gives the family of John Anthony, who was 
born 1607, probably in England. He came to New England 
in the Ship Hercules, April 1684, and was, no doubt, the 
John Anthony whose name is found on the roll o*f freemen, 
of the Island of Rhode Island, "elected" March 16, 1611. He 

died July 28, 1675. His wife was Susanna . She 

died 1675. The children of John and Susanna Anthony were, 
according to Austin: 

I. John, b. 1612, d. Oct. 20, 1715; m. 1st. Frances 
Wodell, of Wm. and Mary. 2d., Susanna Albro, 
of John and Dorothy. 

II. Susanna, b. , d. 1716: m. John, son of John 

and Mary (Paine) Tripp. He was b. 1640, d. 
Nov. 20, 1719. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 119 

III. Elizabeth, b. — — , d. 1698; m. James Greene, son 

of John and Joan (TattersalV) Greene. He was b. 
1626, d. April 27, 1698. 

IV. Joseph, b. , d. — 1728; m. Mary, dau. of 

Thomas Wait. 

V. Abraham, b. , d. Oct. 10, 1727, m. Alice, 

dau. of William and Mary Wodell. She was b. 
Feb. 10,^1650, d. 1734. 
The following abstracts from the Friends records, will help 
those interested in this family to complete a record of the de- 
scendants of John Sr. 

^]VIarriages. 

William, of John, Portsmouth, to Patience Freeborn, of 
Gideon, Sept. 7, 1698. 

Susanna, of Abraham, Portsmouth, to Samuel Hick^, 
Portsmouth, Jan. 1, 1701. 

Joseph, of Joseph, Tiverton, to Elizabeth Fry, of Thomas, 
Newport, Sept. 18, 1711. 

Amey, of William and Mary, Dartmouth, to Isaac Chase, 
of Isaac, Swanzey, Nov. 13, 1729. 

Joseph, of William and Patience, Tiverton, to Deborah 
Wait, of Benjamin and Mary, Portsmouth, Oct. 13, 1742. 

Eunice, of Isaac and Mary, Tiverton, to Samuel Thurston, 
of Edward and Elizabeth, Newport, June 28, 1744. 

Susanna, of James and Elizabeth, Tiverton, to Abraham 
Barker, Tiverton, of James and Elizabeth, Dartmouth, Feb. 
2, 1745. 

Isaac, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Portsmouth, to Ruth 
Russell, of Seth and Hannah. Dartmouth, Feb. 15, 1753. 

Sarah, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Portsmouth, to Walter 
Cornell, of George and Elizabeth, Portsmouth, April 4, 1753. 

Peleg, of Abrahauiand Elizabeth, to Mercy Coggeshall, of 
James and Phebe, Portsmouth, Jan. 5, 1757. 

Jonathan, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Middletown, to 
Elizabeth Gould, of Isaac and Anne, Middletown, Nov. 10, 
1757. 



120 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Isaac, Bristol, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Portsmouth, to 
Hannah Slocum, of Giles and Ann, Portsmnu^^h, Nov. 19, 
17G0. 

William, of Albro and Susanna, Middletown, to Leak 
Hicks, of Samuel and Susanna, Tiverton, . 

Elisha, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Middletown, to Maiy 
Freeborn, of John and Mary, Portsmouth, Feb. 5, 1766. 

Daniel, of Abraliam and Elizabeth, Middletown, to Sylves- 
ter Devoul, of William and Abigail, Portsmouth, April 30, 
1767. 

Ruth, of Isaac and Hannah, Rochester, to Robert Dennis, 
of Robert and Hannah, Portsmouth, Oct. 8, 1783. 

Elizabeth, of Abraham and Mary, Poi'tsmouth, to Moses 
Davis, Bristol, Dec. 7,1785. 

Giles, of Isaac and Hannah, Portsmouth, to Alice Chase, 
of Aaron and Elizabeth, Portsmouth, Jan. 4, 1786. 

Rebecca, of Isaac and Rebecca, Portsmouth, to Walter 
Shearman, of Sampson and Ruth, Portsmouth, Sept. 2, 1 789. 

Jonathan, of John and Elizabeth, Middletown, to Lydia 
Sisson, of Joseph and Ruth, Portsmouth, Dec. 2, 1789. 

Hannah, of Abraham and Mary, Portsmouth, to Robert 
Harkness, of Adam and Mary, Smithfield, [R. I.], 1792. 

Abigail, of Daniel and Sylvester, Middletown, to Adams 
Lawton, of Giles and Mary, Portsmouth, August 30, 1793. 

Peleg, of Job and Catharine, Middletown, to Susanna 
Shearman, or Sampson and Ruth, Portsmouth, Sept. 4, 1793. 

Elijah, of Jonathan and Elizabeth, Middletown, to Louis 
Sisson, of Joseph and Ruth, Middletown, Sept. 4, 1793. . 

Elizabeth, of Daniel and Sylvester, Middletown, to James 
Mitchell, of James and Khoda, Middletown, Sept. 4, 17ii4. 

Alice, of Isaac and Rebecca, Middletown, to Job Shearman, 
of Sampson and Ruth, Dec. 9, 1795. 

Sarah, of Elisha and Mary, Middletown, to Robert Law- 
ton, of Robert and Mary, Newport, Nov. 2, 1800. 

Joseph, of Daniel and Mary, North Providence, to Mary, 
Gould, of John and Sarah, Middletown, May 7, 1801. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



121 



Ruth, of Daniel and Amy, Newport, to Nathan Barker, of 
Matthew and Mary, Newport, June 4, 1807. 

Susanna, of Abraham and Lettishe, Portsmouth, to Henry 
Knowles, of Robert and Lucianna, South Kingston, July 5, 
1803. 

Benjamin, of Abraham and Lettishe, Portsmouth, to Cath- 
arine Almy, of Isaac and Susanna, Portsmouth, May 1, 1812. 

Eunice, of Abraham and Lettishe, Portsmouth, to Job 
Baker, of Ebenezer and Susanna, Westport, Oct. 1, 1813. 

Mary, of Abraham and Lettishe, to William Potter, of 
Thomas and Mary, Portsmouth, Oct. 4, 1820. 

Abigail, of Beriah and Anna, to Holden C. Weeden, of 
John and Anna, Portsmouth, Dec. 5, 1821. 

George, of Elijah and Lois, Middletown, to Margaret 
Hathaway, of George and Susanna, Portsmouth, May 18, 
1829. 

Joseph, of Elijah and Lois, Middletown, to Ruth Hathaway, 
of George and Susanna, Portsmouth, Nov. 13, 1831. 

Eliza, of Job and Phebe, Portsmouth, to Waterman Case, 
of Buffum and Leplie, North Providence, Feb. 11, 1835. 
I Mark, of Edward and Jermima, Taunton, to Amy Shear- 
man, of Asa and Elizabeth, Portsmoutli, Oct. 2, 1839. 









" Birtl7s. 






'John, of 


Abraham 


and Alice, P 


ortsmouth. 


Nov. 7, 1672 


Susanna \ 
Mary \ 




<.(, 


fci 


a 


Aug. 29, 1674 


William 




a 


ii. 


a 


Oct. 31, 1675 


Susanna, 


2d 


(C 


i(. 


a 


Oct. 14, 1677 


Mary 




(,(, 


u 


a 


Jan. 2, 1679 


Abraham 




ki 


1.1. 


ki 


Feb. 21, 1682 


Thomas 




<,!, 


<.t 


a 


June 30, 1684 


Alice I 

James ( 




;i 


CI 


a 


Jan. 22, 1685-6 


Amy 




(.L 


ii 


lb 


June 30, 1688 


[saac 




It 


tl 


a 


Apr. 10, 1690 


lacob 




lb 


IC 


a 


Nov. 15, 1693 



/ 



122 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Sarali, of Jo 


Ul t 


ind Susanna, 


Por 


ts mouth. 


Aug. 1. 1697 


John, of John 


and Frances, 


Portsmouth, 


June 28, 1671 


Joseph 


(( 


(( 




(( 


Oct. 28, 1673 


William 


it, 


a 




a 


July 18, 1676 


Susanna 


a 


a 




a 


Jan. 1, 1677-8 


'Vlaiy 


ii. 


it 




ki 


June 16, 1680 


Sarah 


^ii 


i( 




a 


Oct. 1, 1682 


Elizabeth 


<,!, 


(( 




a 


Sept. 14, 1684 


Alice 


ii 


a 




a 


Apr. 26, 1686 


William, of Willi 


am & Patience. 


Portsmouth, Mar. 13, 1701-2 


Abigai.. 


ii 


a 




i» 


June 23, 1704 



Gideon " "' " Aug. 14, 1706 

David " " '' Sept. 19, 1709 

Susanna " " '' Sept. 26, 1712 

Joseph " " " Sept. 4, 1715 

Thomas, of James Jr., & Elizabeth, Tiverton, Aug. 25, 1712 

Mary " " " Dec. 4, 1713 

Elizabeth " " '' Oct. 9,1715 

Mary, of Jonathan & Elizabeth, Middletown, Aug. 29, 1758 

Gould '^ " " Sept. 80, 1759 

Elizabeth *' " " Jiilv 16, 1762 

Jonathan " " " Mar. 29, 1765 

Elijah " '^ "■ Oct. 19, 1767 
Peckham, of Daniel & Sylvester, Middletown, Oct. 11, 1770 

Elizabeth " " " Jan. 1, 1772 

Abraham " "' " Nov. 14, 1774 

Abigail " " '' Feb. 3,1776 

Rhoda " " " Nov. 9,1780 

Mary, of David and Amy, Newport, Oct. 7, 1786 

Rutii '• '^ '' Apr. 14, 1788 

Abraham " " • " July 29, 1790 

Benjamin '' " *' • Jan. 19, 1792 

Amy " " " Feb. 1, 1794 

Sarah, of Isaac and Mary, Newport, Sept. 15, 1719 

Elizabeth " " *' Jan. 25, 1733 

Philip, of Abraham and Letitia, Portsmouth, Feb. 2, 1784 

Mary '' '• " Mar. 28, 1785 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



123 



Susanna, of Abraham & Letitia, Portsmouth, Dec. 17, 1786 



Mary 


a 




li 


(( 


June 23, 1788 


Benjamin 


ii. 




.(. 


IC 


Feb. 28, 1790 


Eunice 


a 




fc( 


(( 


July 24, 1791 


Hannah 


fc( 




4C 


(( 


Sept. 1. 1793 


Stephen 


a 




(6 


i(, 


Dec. 24, 1795 


Phebe 


1% 




C( 


it. 


Mar. 19, 1798 


Abraham 


i.i 




(( 


ii 


Oct. 1,1800 


Susanna, 


of John anc. 


Johanna, Newport, 


June 20, 1728 


Elizabeth 


Cl 




(( 


bb 


May 18,1728 


Mary 


ii 




(; 


ii 


June 6, 1731 


Ruth, of Daniel 


an 


d Amy 


, Newport, 


Apr. 14, 1788 


Abraham 


l.i 




a 


n 


July 29, 1790 


Benjamin 


(C 




a 


ii 


Jan. 19, 1792 


Amy 


(( 




c; 


ii 


Feb. 1, 1794 


Elam (?), 


of Jonath 


an 


& Lydia, 


Middletown, 


Oct. 5, 1791 


Jacob 


a 




i(. 


a 


Mar. 20, 1792 


Asa 


(fc 




a 


(.i 


Feb. 12. 1794 


Ruth 


ii 




a 


u 


Jan. 26, 1796 


Silas 


>,(, 




ii, 


n 


Apr. 25, 1798 


Josiah 


a 




a 


(; 


Aug. 28, 1800 


Avis 


ki 




c. W 


ashington,N.Y 


. Oct. 15, 1802 


Isaac 


(,i 




(( 


Berne, N. Y., 


Jan. 18, 1806 


David 


i( 




" Schagticoke,N. Y 


. May 25, 1809 


Elizabeth, 


of A bra 


am 


& Mary. 


, Portsmouth, 


Nov. 6, 1744 


Danie'. 


ii 




tfc 


Warwick, 


May 25, 1750 


Lucy 


(( 




(( 


4( 


Nov. 21, 1751 


David 


(( 




a 


ii 


Feb. 15,1754 


Hannali 


k 1. 




n 


(( 


Sept. 14, 1757 


Job 


a 




(.i 


ii 


Nov. 10, 1758 


Sarah 


ti 




u 


ii 


Mar. 9, 1763 


Joseph, of Elijah 


an 


d Lois, 


Middletown, 


June 29, 1794 


George 


a 




(( 


ki 


Oct. 31, 1796 


Joseph 


(fc 




(( 


a 


Dec. 23, 1798 


Hannah 


a 




kt 


a 


Feb. 15, 1802 


Ruth, of Pelef];' an 


dS 


usanna. 


Portsmouth, 


June 7, 1794 


Samson 


ii 




fci 


14 


Sept. 15, 1795 



124 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Hannah, 


of Giles 


and Alice, 


Portsmouth, 


Oct. 27, 1789 


Alice 


i( 




il. 


i<. 


Oct. 11, 1792 


Giles 


a 




1,1, 


u 


July 15, 1794 


Isaac 


(fc 




(,1, 


(fc 


Aug. 12, 1796 


Harriet 


4( 




(,i 


(( 


July 21, 1799 


Elizabeth 


il. 




u 


(fc 


Feb. 1, 1802 


Mar J 


U 




(,(, 


(( 


Feb. 25, 1805 


Abigail, ( 


if Beriah 


and 


Anne, 


Middletown, 


Aug. 31, 1796 


Susanna 


(t 




u 


1.1. 


June 17, 1799 


Geo. Hathaway, of Geo. 


& Mary, Middle town. 


May 1, 1830 


Joseph Sisson " 




(( 


u 


Mar. 11, 1883 


Elijah 


u 




i<. 


fc( 


May 28, 1835 


Rachel 


(( 




il. 


(( 


Nov. 15, 1837 


James 


u ■ 




(( 


ii. 


Nov. 6, 1840 


William 


(( 




(( 


(,<. 


Apr. 6, 1843 


Hannah G 


reen 




(( 


<,i 


Dec. 10, 1844 


Sarah, of 


Joseph and Ruth, 


Middletown, 


Nov. 28, 1832 


Edward 


k( 




(( 


',(, 


Jan. 28, 1835 


Lois 


((. 




u 


. 44 


May 7, 1836 


Susanna 


u 




(( 


(,(. 


Apr. 5, 1840 


Elizabeth 


(.1. 




(( 


!,(, 


Feb. 9, 1842 



Deaths. 

Mary, of Abraham and Alice, Portsmouth, age 1 year, 
Sept. 21, 1674. 

Susanna, of Abraham and Alice, Portsmouth, age 2 months, 
Oct. 11, 1674. 

John, Portsmouth, July 28, 1675. 

Mary, of John and Frances, Portsmouth, age 4 years, Dec. 
8, 1664. 

Sarah, of John and Frances, Portsmouth, age 1 year. May 
13, 1684. 

Thomas, of Abraham and Alice, Portsmouth, "at the house 
of Valentine Bowler, Deal, England," age 21 years, 4 
months, March 19, 1705. > 

James, of Abraham and Alice, age 18 years, 4 months, 
May 13, 1704. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 125 

Joseph, of John, Portsmouth, "shot by accident at Daniel 
Howlands ferry," Dec. 16, 1709. 

Alice, of Abraham and Alice, Newport, age 26 years, Sept. 
8, 1711. 

Alice, widow of Abraham, daughter of William Woodell, 
Portsmouth, "at her son Williams', in Swanzey," age 84 
years, (Prob. 1734.) 

Gideon, of William and Patience, Portsmouth, age 41 
years, 3 months, 23 days, Dec. 6, 1747. 

Patience, wife of William, Portsmouth, daughter of Gideon 
Freeborn, age 81 years, 1 month, 12 days, April 27, 1757. 

William, Portsmouth, "a Public Friend from youth^" 81 
years, 3 months, 24 days, Nov. 9, 1757. 

Mary, of Jonathan and Elizabeth, Middletown, age 3 
months, Jan. 1, 1759. 

Jonathan, Middletown, age 41 j^ears, Feb. 19, . 

Isaac, Newport, age 83 years, Nov. 3, 1773. 

Mercy, widow of Isaac, Newport, age 88 years, March 27, 
1775. 

Eunice, dau. of Isaac and Mercy, widow of Samuel Thurs- 
ton, age 55 years, Nov. 7, 1777. 

Elizabeth, wife of Joseph, Tiverton, age 75 years, Dec. 19, 
1754. 

Thomas, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Tiverton, age 54 years, 
Jan. 14, 17(58. 

Joseph, Tiverton, age 94 years, 4 months, 19 days. 

Eleanor, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Tiverton, age 57 years, 
Sept. 8, 1777. 

Giles, of Peleg and Mercy, Newport, age 21 years, Jan. 
14, 1785. 

Mary, of Abraham and Letitia, Feb. 22, 1787. 

Sarah, of Isaac and Mary, Newport, age 67 years, Dec. 
7, 1786. 

Mary, of John, age 20 years, April, 1751. 

Elizabeth, of Isaac and Mercy, age 58 years, June 16, 1791. 

Amy, wife of Daniel, Newport, Feb. 3, 1794. 






126 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Mary, wife of Abraham, Portsmouth, age 76 years, 1 month, 
20 days, June 4, 1795. 

William, Portsmouth, age 9-1 years, July 29, 1796. 

fJoseph, of Elijah and Lois, age 3 years, Sept. 9, 1797. 

Elisha, of Abraham and Elizabeth, age 76 years, Feb. 1, 
1807. 

Susanna, of John and Joanna, Portsmouth, age 72 years, 
April 22, 1796. 

Amy, wife of Daniel, dau. of Sampson and Ruth Shearman, 
age 30 years, Feb. 3, 1794. 

Daniel, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Portsmouth, age 70 
years, March 1, 1808. 

Sylvester, widow of Daniel, dau. of William and Abigai 
Devol, age, *'upwards 70 years," April 1, 1808. 

Amy, of Daniel and Amy, age 8 months, 1794. 

Abraham, of Daniel and Amy, at New Bedford, age 12 
years, 1802. 

Mary, of Abraham and Letitia, Portsmouth, age 2 years, 
Feb. 22, 1797. 

Mary, widow of Elisha, Middletown, age 67 years, June 
26, 1809. 

Daniel of Abraham and Mary, Portsmouth, "sailed for Sa- 
vannah, Dec. 14, 1804, and was never heard from," age 54 
years, 6 months. 

Elizabeth, widow of Jonathan, dau. of Jacob and Anne 
Gould, Newport, age 77, Dec. 13, 1812. 

Rhoda, of Daniel and Sylvester, Middletown, age 36 years, 
9 months, Aug. 8, 1817. 

Susanna, of John and Joanna, Portsmouth, age 72 years, 
April 22, 1796. 

Elizabeth, of John and Joanna, Portsmouth, age 91 3^ears 
5 months, Sept. 17, 1818. 

Abraham, of Philip, Portsmouth, age 69 years, "30 years 
Town Clerk," Jan. 18, 1821. 

Anthony, Anna, widow of Beriah, dau. of Giles and Mary 
Lawton, Portsmouth, age 56 years, 9 months, 4 days. 



MAGAZTKE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 127 

Elizabeth, wife of Gideon, dan. of Joshua Coggeshall, 
Middletown, age 70 years, Sept. 3, 1828. 

Phebe, wife of Job, Portsmouth, dau. of John and Eliza- 
beth Chase, Swanzey, age 65 years, 3i months. 

Anna, Middletown, of Philip and Mary, age 88 years, 3 
months, March 24, 1842. 

Joseph, of Elijah and Lois, Oct. 25, 1842. 

Luce, of Abraham and Mary, Portsmouth, age 92 years, 
Dec. 25, 1843. 

Elijah, of Jonathan and Elizabeth, Middletown, Dec. 3, 

1842. 

Job, of Abraham and Mary, Warwick, ago 92 years, 3 
months, Feb. 5, 1851. 

Susanna, dau. of Job and Elizabeth, widow of Abraham 

Barker, Tiverton, age 7 — years, 8 months, Aug. 10, 1801. 

Sarah, of Abraham, and Elizabeth, widow of Cornell, 

Tiverton, March 21, 1813. 

Sarah, of John and Susanna, widow of Thomas Gould, 
Portsmouth, age 100, Feb. 20, 1798. 



Mt. Desert Island. — Mt. Desert has a history dating 
back to old mediaeval days, as naturally enough the early 
voyagers coming in sight of her remarkable outline were 
deeply impressed, and carried their interest into exploration. 
Doubtless others before Champalin may have marked its bold 
and solitary features, though he was the first to definitely 
describe as well as appropriately name it. It is singular that 
there has been in recent years so much controversy over the 
meaning and pronunciation of this islands name, which its dis- 
coverer so plainly states he named for its desert mountains. 

"This same day", [September, 1604], writes Champlain in 
his note book, "we passed quite near an island which is some 
four or five leagues long, and were nearly lost on a little 
rock, just under water, which made a small hole in our bark 
near the keel. The island is very high, and so cleft in places 
that at sea it appears as if seven or eight mountains were 
ranged side by side. I have named the island ITsle des 
Monts Desert. Its latitude is 41i°" 



Land in Stonington, Conn., Sold for the use of 
the Pequot Indians, 1683. 




COMMUNICATED BY HON. EICHAED A. "WHEELER. 

N the January number of the Magazine of New Eng- 
land History for 1892, "J. A." wishes to know some- 
thing about the land sold in Stonington, Connecticut^ 
to James Avery and Thomas Leffingwell, in Trust-, 
for the use of the Pequot Indians in 1683. It will be re- 
membered that after the overthrow of the Pequot Indians by 
Capt. John Mason and his famous 90 men in May, 1637, to 
wit on the 21st day of Sept., 1637, Uncas and Miantonomo, 
with the remaining Pequots met the Magistrates of Connec- 
iicut at Hartford, when and where a treaty was made and 
entered into between Connecticut, the Mohegans and Narra- 
gansetts, and by its terms there was to be perpetual peace 
between these two tribes and the English, and with imposing 
ceremonies the Magistrates divided the remainder of the 
Pequots between the Narragansetts, Mohegans and Niantic 
Indians. To Uncas they gave eighty, to Miantonomo, 
eighty and to Ninegret twenty, with the declaration that 
they (the Pequots) were no longer to be known and called 
by that name, nor were they ever to dwell again in their old 
haunts or occupy their planting or hunting grounds; where- 
upon Uncas, Miantonomo and Ninegret, took their captives 
to their tribal lands, with the expectation of merging them 
with their tribes as slaves. But the proud and haughty 
Pequots would not endure the servitude nor the excessive 
dominations of Uncas and Miantonomo, and ahnost immedi- 
ately fled from their dominions. Those assigned Miantonomo 
came to Massatuxet in the present town of Westerly, where 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 12 



they continued to reside until 1661. Those assigned to 
Ninegret remained with his tribe until 1654, when upon the 
demand of the English, they left him and merged themselves 
with Miantonomo's men at Massatuxet, and there remained 
with them until 1661, when both portions were driven over 
the Pawcatuck River into Connecticut by the Misquamacnt 
plante-rs. 

The towns of Stonington and North Stonington were then 
one town under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Coloni- 
al authority, and then known as Stonington. The inhabi- 
tants thereof were then opposed to the Pequots locating 
themselves permanently in their town. They first pitched 
their wigwams at Cawset Neck on the seashore, but found 
themselves trespassing upon lands of the English planters; 
some found their waj' to Cosaduck, now North Stonington, 
others worked for the planters and lived in their families. 
Wequash Cook, a Niantic Sachem, who came with the 
Pequots from Niantic to Massatuxet, was appointed Govern- 
our over them in 1661, by the Commissioners of the United 
Colonies, and was reappointed by them and the Connecticut 
authorities as long as he lived. The same year the Massa- 
chusetts General Court granted this company of the Pequots 
8000 acres of land, and the next year the Commissioners of 
the United Colonies ordered the same to be laid out to them 
at Cosaduck, now in North Stonington. Wequash Cook, alias 
Harmon Garret, died in 1678, when a noted Pequot Indian, 
by the name of Mornoho, was selected and appointed Gov- 
ernour in his stead. Harmon left a son Catepunt, who 
claimed to succeed his father, and was so recognized as to the 
tribal lands in Stonington, but beijig a Niantic Indian, was 
not acceptable to the Pequots. It was found impossible at 
that time to lay out 8000 acres of land in Stonington without 

entrenching upon lands already granted to the English 
planters. 

So after Mornoho became the recognized Chief of this 

company of the Pequots, he made an effort to undermine the 

influence of Cassasinaman, Governour of the Uncas Company 



X. 



130 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of the Pequots, then residing at Noank in the Town of 
Groton, but did not succeed. After which he petitioned the 
General Court to grant his company lands upon which they 
might locate themselves permanently. But the town as 
such was from the outset opposed to their location in their 
limits. 

The General Court in respond to Mornoho's petitions ap- 
pointed several committees to treat with him and the Pequots 
under his control, who visited Stonington and tried to find a 
suitable home for them, but all of their efforts were of no 
avail until 1683, when a committee so appointed were in- 
structed to move the town of Stonington to lay out lands 
for a permanent home for Mornoho's Company. But the 
town refused, claiming that the Pequot Indians were the 
wards of the Colony, and not of the town of Stonington. 

Additional instructions had been given this Committee to 
provide lands in some way for the Indians, by purchase, or 

exchange of colonial lands for a home for them- So in 
pursuance of the authority vested in them by the General 
Court the Committee consisting of Capt. James Fitch, Capt. 
James Avery, and Lieut. Thomas Leffingwell purchased by 
way of exchange a tract of land of Isaac Wheeler, of Stoning- 
ton, situated there, (now North Stonington) containing two 
hundred and eighty acres of land. The conveyance thereof 
was made to Capt. Avery and Lieut. Thomas Leffingwell in 
trust for Mornoho and his company of Pequots. The deed 
bears date May 24th, 1683. 

Mr. Wheeler reserved for his own use the continuous 
herbage of said land, receiving in payment therefore from 
the Connecticut Colony five hundred acres of Colony land 
(so called) the same to be located and laid out to his liking. 
Two hundred acres thereof were laid out to him at Pachog, to 
which Oneko, the Mohegan Sachem claimed a prior right, 
which Mr. Wheeler purchased of him for three pounds. . 

Mr. Wheeler's youngest daughter, Experiance, married 
the Rev. Joseph Coit of Plainsfield, Conn., and as a wedding 
present he gave the remaining three hundred acres of his 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 131 

said Colony land to them. In 1713 Mr. Coit petitioned the 
General Assembly of Conn., to layout said land to him. The 
Assembly granted his request, and directed the surveyor of 
New London County to locate and lay out said land, agree- 
ably to the wishes of Mr. Coit and the people of his charge 
which was selected by Mr. Coit, and laid out to him in 
Plainsfield, Conn. 

The reservation of the herbage of said tract of land caused 
a good deal of trouble to the Indians as well as to other 
parties claiming it. 

In his last will, probated in 1712, Mr. Wheeler gave, with 
other lands adjoining, his said right of herbage to his son 
William Wheeler, who in his last will dated 1747,bequeathed 
the same to two of his sons-in-law, Mr. William Williams 
and Nathan Crary. 

Sometime before 1716 Samuel Miner and his brother-in-law 
Josiah Grant purchased four grants of Colony land given by 
the General Court in 1671 and 1672 to four Pequot soldiers, 
viz: Nicholas Clark, Thomas Spencer, Robert Stewford and 
Benedictus Alford, containing just two hundred and eighty 
acres. In 1716 Mr. Miner (having previously purchased Mr. 
Grants interest in said Pequot grants) located and laid out 
the same over and upoii the land sold by Mr. Isaac Wheeler 
to the Colonial Committee in 1683, for the benefit of Mor- 
noho and his company of the Pequots and thereupon claimed 
the same as his own property. This attempt of Mr. Miner 
to get possession of the Pequot lands was ' resisted by Mr. 
William Wheeler as well as by the Indians, because if allowed 
it would extinguish Mr. Wheeler's right of herbage therein. 

After the death of Mr. Samuel Miner his brother, James 
Miner, acting as his executor, petitioned the General Assem- 
bly in 1723, praying that his late brother's Pequot grants 
laid out by him on Mornoho's lands might be confirmed to 
him leaving to the Indians what might be needed for them. 

In response to this petition the Assembly as usual appoint- 
ed a Committee to visit Stonington and make the requisite 
investigations, first giving notice to all parties in interest. 



I 



132 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Acting in pursuance thereof the Committee assembled, 
and all of the interested parties appeared and were heard 
thereon. Before this Committee reached a conclusion rela- 
tive tliereto Mr. Wheeler and Miner compromised their 
claims, Wheeler purchasing Miner's interest for sixty pounds, 
which relieved the Committee from any further labor as 
between Wheeler and Miner. [ 

The rights of the Indians were not considered, and their 
grievances whatever they were, were left apparently unnoticed. 

Not long after the termination of this investigation Mr. 
Wheeler fenced in the entire tract of 280 acres and improved 
it for the herbage, thereby compelling the Indians to fence in 
and enclose their gardens, and such lands as they wished to 
plant, subject to his approval. 

In this manner these lands were occupied and improved by 
him and the Indians during the remainder of his life, he 
taking all the grass and hay produced thereon. After his 
death in 1748 his sons-inlaw, Williams and Crary and their 
wives, divided the land between them, after which Crary 
and his wife sold a part of their share thereof to Simeon 
Miner, another of his son-in-laws. 

These lands were now claimed by Williams and Crary 
in fee, subject only to the right of the Indians to plant corn, 
build wigwams and live there under the guardianship of an 
overseer then appointed by the General Assembly. 

The result was that the Indians received but little benefit 
from the land, as they could not keep any meat stock or sheep 
there, and for redress appealed to the General Assembly 
in 1750. Whereupon another Committee was appointed 
to inquire into the trouble, which came to Stonington and 
after investigating the matter became convinced that they 
were not invested with power and authority requisite to 
probe the matter to the bottom, and so reported to the 
General Assembly at its next session. Whereupon the Assem- 
bly appointed another committee with adequate authority, 
who visited Stonington and proceeded at once to the dis- 
charge of their duties, and finally reached a compromise, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 183 

satisfactory to Williams and Crary, and Mornoho's Company 
which, when reported to the Assembly by this committee, 
was approved and was as follows: The Governour and Coun- 
cil agree to release to Williams and Crary two gore strips 
of land, one of thirty.five acres on the south side of the 
original tract, and the other of twenty acres on the east side 
thereof, with permission to locate their ancient four Pequot 
soldiers grants of land aggregating 280 acres on any Colony 
land undisposed of, on condition that Williams and Crary 
would release the entire balance of the original tract of 280 
acres to the Governour and Council for the benefit of Mor- 
noho and his company, to which they agreed, and subse- 
quently conveyed all of their interest whatever it was in the 
main tract to the Colony, receiving in turn an absolute title 
to the two gore strips of land, with the assurance that their 
Pequot land grants, should be laid out to them by Roger 
Shearman, who subsequently located and laid them out in 
the town of Plainsfield, Conn. 

So after a lono- and bitter controversv the title of Morno- 
ho's tract of land became vested in the three-Colony, now 
State of Connecticut, and after Mornoho's death the same 
Avas placed under the control and supervision of overseers 
at first appointed by the General Assembly, but now by the 
Supreme Court, and the same is known and called "The 
Indian Reservation, situated in the Town of North Stoning- 
ton, Conn." 

Dii. Mather Byles was tlie first Congregational minister, 
(1738-1776), who appeared in the pulpit at Boston in a gown 
with bands. Plis congregation considered it popery. After 
the service, the deacons and others waited on him and re- 
quested him to lay it aside, or preach to biire walls. This 
dress was sent a present to him by the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, with whom he is said to have corresponded. A few 
months later the British Government ordered all the judges 
to sit on the bench clothed in scarlet cloaks and large white 
wigs. 



Notes. 

Pearce Family. — Some additions and corrections to the 
article on John Pearce (Mason), in Volume One. 

Page 141, Sarah^, of Samuel^ married about 1763, Paul 
Chase, of James and Alice QAnthony) Chase, of Dighton, 
Mass. He was born February 7, 1736, and died July 28, 
1796, in Taunton, Mass. 

Page 141, Dorcas Pearce was married, (2d), November 23, 
1775. 

Page 142. Hannah Easton was born February 12, 1773. 

Page 145. In fifth line from the top, strike out "May 18, 
1756." 

Page 145. Abigail Spink died July 7, 1791. 

Page 146. Sarah*, of Nathan-^, married. Providence, R. I., 
June 2, 1745, Richard Stafford, of Capt. Thomas, of Coventry 
R. I., in place of the record given. T. L. C. 

Decoy Ships in Boston Harbor, 1776. — That all is 
"fair in war" is illustrated by the following resolve of the 
Massachusetts Assembly, passed June, 1776. 

Resolved^ That the said Committee be, and they hereby 
are, empowered to procure, on the best terms, two Ships at 
the expense of this Colony, and man and fix them in such 
way and place them at such station, as may appear to the 
said Committee best calculated to serve as a decoy to the 
enemy's Ships and Vessels that may at any time be coming 
into the Harbour of Boston. And the aforesaid Com" 
mittee are further empowered and directed to erect such 
Lights, where the Light-House stood, without erecting a 
Light-House, as may serve further to decoy and bring into 
the Harbour of Boston Ships and Vessels of the enemy afore- 
,said. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 135 

An Ancient Thanksgiving Proclamation. — In Pil- 
grim Hall, Plymouth, Massachusetts, can be seen a printed 
copy of one of the oldest Thanksgiving proclamations extant. 
The copy from which the following is taken was published 
at the time for distribution among the various officials and 
clergymen of the State. It was reprinted in the Plymouth 
Old Colony Memorial, of November 28, 1891. 

By the honourable 

William Dummer Esq; 

Lieutenant Governour and Commander-in-Chief of His 
Majesty's Province of the Massachusetts Bay in 
New England: 

A Proclamation for a General 

THANKSGIVING. 

Forasmuch as amidst the various & awful Rebukes of 
Heaven with which we are righteously afflicted. We are 
still under the highest and most indispensible Obligations of 
Gratitude for the many Instances of Divine Goodness in the 
course of the year past, more especially. That it has pleased 
Almighty God to prolong the Life of our most gracious 
Sovereign Lord the King, their Royal Highnesses the Prince 
and Princess of Wales, and their Illustrious Offspring, and 
to give an happy Increase to the Royal Family ; To defeat 
the wicked and desperate Conspiracies against His Majesty's 
Sacred Person and Rightful Government, and to direct the 
Council of the Nation to such Measures for the Suppressing 
and Punishing the same, as under God ma}^ prove the Means 
of their lasting Quiet and Security; So far to succeed the 
Administrations of His Majesty's Government in this 
Province, To continue our invaluable Privileges, to restore 
Health to us. To give us great plenty of the Fruits of the 
Earth, To Defeat in some Measure the repeated attempts of 
the Indian Enemy against us, and to defend so many of our 
Frontier Plantations from their Rage and Fury, To guard 
our Sea-Coasts against the rapacious and bloody Pirates, and 
deliver many of^them into the Hands of Justice ; And above 



136 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

all that He continues to us the precious Benefits and Liber- 
ties of the Gospel; 

I have therefore thought fit by and with the Advice of His 
Majesty's Council to Order & Appoint that Thursday the 
Twenty-eighth of November Currant be solemnly Observed 
as a Day of Publick Thanksgiving throughout this Prov- 
ince. Exhorting botli Ministers and People in their respec- 
tive Assemblies to offer up their unfeigned Thanks to Al- 
mighty God for these and all other unmerited Favors. And 
all Servile Labour is forbidden on the said Day. 

Given at the Council Chamber in Boston the Sixth Day 
of November, 1723. In the Tenth Year of the Reign of our 
Sovereign Lord George, by the Grace of God, of Great 
Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c. 

By order of the Honourable, the Lieut. Governour by and 

with the Advice of the Council. 
Josiah Willard, Seer. 

W. DUMMER. 
God Save the King. 

A Revolutionary Flag. — At the Jackson celebration, 
in New Orleans, January 8. 1892, the old Continental battle 
flag of General Nathaniel Greene's command, was on exhibi- 
tion. The Times Democrat of New Orleans (January 8, '92) 
has the following description of the old flag: 

"This old flag was presented to Gen. Nathaniel Greene by 
the ladies of Charlestown, Mass., near Bunker Hill, and 
which Capt. (afterward General) Ward, of Greene's com- 
mand, carried at Breed's Hill the 17th of June, 1775. It was 
then turned over to the safe keeping of Company A at Cam- 
bridge. Gen. Greene carried it with him to Trenton, Ger- 
man town, Monmouth and North and South Carolina. It 
afterward became the property of Gen. Greene's aid-de-camp, 
the gallant Lieut. John B. Burgess, and it has been handed 
down as an heirloom in the family till it passed into the 
hands of Mrs. Annie Burgess, of Avoyelles parish, La., who 
is the only surviving granddaughter of Lieut, Col. Burgess, 
and who is also related to Gen. Greene, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 13T 

The colors of this precious relic of old heroic days are 
faded and the fabric is much decayed. It was made of cream 
colored silk and Sea Island cotton. The inscriptions upon 
it were embroidered in silk of three colors by the 'Revolu- 
tionary Mothers.' A large letter 'A' is inscribed upon it, 
and the following legend: 

O'er the wood-covered hills and green vale of the West, 

Where the sound of the tocsin has rolled— 
Our youth rise in armor for liberty pressed; 

'Tisa beautiful sight to behold! 

Green Mountain boys North throng the hillocks like ants, 

When serpents intrude on their bed- 
In the teeth of the warlike attack they advance, 

Nor stop till the British are fled! 

Renown to the fathers of this manly nation, 

And health to their sons that emblason her story; 
United Americans pour the libation 

To heroes and sages immortal in glory! 

The land that we live in we love for ascendance, 
In sound common sense and in bold independence. 

The inscription upon the pendant is as follows, and was 
added bv the ladies of Charleston, S. C: 

Don't give up the colors, 

Death or liberty, brave boys; 
It was baptized with war at Bunker's Hill, 
It was christened with independence and folded in peace." 



An Historic Bell. — One of the most interesting relics in 
the State of Rhode Island is the old bell on the Butterfly 
factory, in the town of Lincoln. Figures carved on the bell 
and authentic facts lead to tlie belief that it was cast in Ams- 
terdam and long used on a convent in England, later it was 
used in the English navy and was on the ship Guerriere 
when she was captured by the Constitution in 1812. The 
bell was sold by the United States and thus came through 
the hands of the late Stephen H. Smith to its present resting 
place. It contains the following inscription: ''Peter Seest 
Amstelodame. Anno. 1263. Me. Fecit." 



Queries. 



10. Tompkins. —Samuel Tompkins was admitted a freeman 
of the Colony of Rhode Island, for Newport, May 1759. 
Samuel Tompkins, of Prudence Island, son-in-law of Samuel 
Thurston, a Quaker, made a deposition that Aaron, a negro, 
who was indented to him, was not off the Island on the night 
of the destruction of the schooner Gaspee, June 9, 1772. 
Samuel Tompkins was appointed in June, 1776, to command 
the frigate Providence. 

A Samuel Tompkins was living in Cranston, R. I., in 1781. 
Married in Newport, Jan. 9, 1766, Samuel Tompkins of New- 
port and Phebe Clark of Middletown. Sept. 8, 1871, Samuel 
Tompkins of Newport, and Catherine Belcher of Jamestown, 
R. I. Does this all refer to one Samuel Tompkins and who 
was he? 

On the records of the Friends Society of Newport, R. I., 
is this : 

''John, son of John and Mary Tompkins, born at Ports- 
mouth, R. I., 5th month 11 day, 1683." Who were this 
John and Mary, and what became of John Jr.. born in 1683? 

On Page 139, Vol. 16, Historical Collections of Essex 
Institute, Mass., under the first book of Intentions of Mar- 
riage, City of Lynn, I find the following: "July 17, 1710, 
Ralph Tompkins of Great Brittain and Mrs. Mary Jefferds 
of Lynn." Can any one tell me if this Ralph left any de- 
scendants in this country, if so who, and where can they be 
found? 

Married in Tiverton, R. L, Timothy Giffard and Hannah 
Tompkins, April 18, 1717. Are any descendants of this 
Timothy Giffard and Hannah Tompkins now living? 

Married at Tiverton, R. I., June 23, 1744, Nathaniel 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 139 

Tompkins and Elizabeth Wordell. Who was this Nathaniel 
Tompkins and when did Elizabeth die? 

Answers to the above questions earnestly solicited by M. 
L. Tompkins, 19 N. Boulevard, Vineland, N. J. 

11. TiLLiNGHAST. — Information is wanted concerning 
Paris Hendren Tillinghast, son of Joseph and Mary (Hen- 
dvon-Paris) Tillinghast, who was born 1731, and died in 
Newport, R. I. He is said to have had five children ; the 
record of only one is known, Paris Stutely, born 1770 (?), 
and died at Eppingham, Georgia. Where can be found a 
record of the other members of this family? Date of death of 
Paris Sr., together with facts relating to his marriage, and 
that of his wife desired. 

Eunice A. Tillinghast. 
811 Eddy St. Providence.^ R. I. 

12. Mayo. — What was the maiden name of Hannah, 
wife of John Mayo? John Mayo was a son of John^ and 
Grandson of Rev. John^ Mayo, one of the early settlers of 
Cape Cod. John Mayo^ Avas born December 15, 1652. He 
resided at Hingham, Mass., from 1681 until about 1704, 
when he removed to Harwich (now Brewster, I think) of 
which town he was a representative to the General Court of 
Massachusetts for many years. His children were: 

I. John^ 
II. Hannahs born 1681. 
III. Samuels born 1684. 
. IV. Mercy*, born 1688. 
V. MaryS born 1694. 
VI. Josephs born 1696. 
VII. Reliances 
VHI. Elizabeths born 1706. 

John^ died February 1, 1726. I have recently become in- 
terested in the Mayo family and desire to obtain information 
concerning John and his ancestors. P. T. 

13. The Town Sergeant and hes Drum. — Nothing had 
a greater tendency to remind us of old times, when theprimi- 



140 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

tive simplicit}'- of our fathers predominated, than the vener- 
able Town Sergeant with his drum, who, in my younger days, 
called the freemen together to attend to the business which 
belonged to the good government and the protection of the 
people. It was onl}^ a few years ago that this custom was 
given up. Is it still in vogue in any part of New England? 
Cannot some of your readers give us some information on 
the subject. Cape Cod. 

14. William Goodell Field. — Can any reader of the 
Magazine give the parentage, date and place of birth,date and 
place of death, and any characteristics, personal or prof ession- 
al, of William Goodell Field, (Brown University 1808) 
who was a lawyer and practised in New Hampshire, and 
went about 1830 to Dayton, Ohio? 

Exeter, N. H. Charles H. Bell. 

15. Rogers.— Jeremiah Dummer Rogers, born in Little- 
ton, Mass., March 25, 1743, died at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Jan. 
14, 1784. His wife, Bathsheba Thatcher, to whom he was 
married Dec. 25, 1769, survived him. Is the ■ date of her 
death known? who were her parents? R. 

16. Almy. — John Almy of Dartmouth, Mass., married De- 
borah , before 1720. They had a dau. Deborah who 

married John Slocum, son of Eliezer, Dec. 25, 1738. Of 
what family was this John Almy, and what was the maiden 
name of his wife? Almy. 

17. Cutler. — In an interesting sketch of "several families 
bearing the name of Cutler in the United States," by Rev. 
Abner Morse, Boston, 1867, I read that David Cutler, son 
of John, of Hingham, Mass., born November 1, 1689, "settled 
in Boston, as a mariner, and lost all his real estate, and died 
probably abroad,intestate,1730. He married Ann Miller (?) 
who, October 8, 1730, was appointed administratrix on his 
estate, valued at X 77.11, of which she was allowed, for her- 
self and two small children, £35. She died his widow, and 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 141 

February 19, 1777, was buried in Trinity Church yard, aged 
80". The same record gives his children as follows: 

I. Ann, alias Nancy, born 1718, baptized at King's 
Chapel, Nov. 8, 1723, and Sept. 27, 1810, was in- 
terred in Trinity Church yard, unmarried, aged 92. 
II. John, baptized at King's Chapel, August 22, 1725, 
died Oct. 31, 1805, aged 82. 
III. Mary, baptized at King's (^-hapel, Feb. 19, 1726-7, 

died before 1730. 
Since the issue of the pamphlet mentioned, has anything 
been learned concerning the death of David Cutler? Has it 
been proved that the maiden name of his wife was Miller? 

Of the children named above, John is said to have married 
Mary Clark, Nov. 27. 1750. She was a dau. of Benjamin and 
Miriam (^Kilhy') Clark. His will was proved Nov. 11, 1805. 

Can any one give the exact date of his death? 

Mary L. Clark. 

18. Manchester-Eldred. — Who were the parents of 
Edward Manchester, who married, February 4, 1720, Anna 
Williston, of Little Compton, R. I.? Who were the parents 
of Daniel Eldred (or Eldridge), said to have been born at 
Newport or Kingston, R. I., 1760-61, who married Rebecca 
dau. of Thomas and Mary (^Perry) Steadman, of Kingston, 
or South Kingston, R. I.? Mary {Perry) Steadman was dau. 
of Benjamin Perry, born Aug. 29, 1760. 

Cleveland^ Ohio. D. W. Manchester. 

19. The Survey of Vermont, 1791 — About the year 
1791, when Vermont as a State was admitted to the Union, 
a survey is believed to have been made, and the lines settled 
around the State, under the supervision of Barnabas Dodge 
of Hamilton, Mass., a noted surveyor of the time, for which 
services, land at a penny an acre, is said to have been offered 
him in payment, which was not accepted. The query is, to 
find the record of this survey, &c. Is it in the State Library 
of Vermont at xMontpelier, or at Burlington, Vt., or else- 
where? 

Salem^ Mass. A. G. 



142 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

20. Dixon or Dickson. — Where can I find a record of 
tlie children of John and Margary {Wlnship') Dixon, or 
Dickson as it was afterwards written? He was a son of Wil- 
liam D. Dixon who was a member of the Cambridge, Mass., 
church about 1650. P. J. 

f^EPLilES. 



1. The "Rev. J. Howe," whose name is found on a funer- 
al ring mentioned among the queries, in the January num- 
ber, was Rev. Joseph Howe, a graduate of Yale College in 
the class of 1766, who was settled over the New South 
Church in Boston, where he was ordained on May 19, IT 73. 

The following notice of his death is found in ''The New 
England Chronicle: or the Essex Gazette (Cambridge), 
Thursday, August 31, 1775": 

"On Friday, [August 25] died at Hartford, the Rev. 
Joseph Howe, late Pastor of a Church in Boston." A long 
sketch of him appears in the same newspaper, September 14, 
which was taken from the Providence Gazette. 

Samuel A. Greene. 

[During the late war (1862),the ring mentioned above was 
given to a Captain of a Pennsylvania regiment by one of the 
soldiers in his company. The supposition was that the soldier 
obtained it from some one in the neighborhood where the regi- 
ment was then located, in Virginia. The ring is now in pos- 
session of Mr. H. S. Hopper, 514 Walnut street, Philadel- 
phia. Ed.] 

3. I find in the January number an inquiry concerning 
Reverend Moses Sweat. The Maine Minutes of the Congre- 
gational churches for 1867 say that Mr. Sweat was ordained 
at Sanford, Maine, July 19, 1786, the da}^ the church was 
organized, and that he died August 30, 1822. He was not a 
graduate of any college, but received the honorary degree of 
A. M., from Harvard in 1790. He published "A Critical in- 
vestigation of the mode of baptism, as performed in the Prim- 
itive churches," Kenebunk, 1805, pp. 88. 

MaryE. Stone. 



Record of Marriages, 

BY KEY. GARDNER THURSTON, PASTOR OF THE SECOND BAP- 
TIST CHURCH, NEWPORT, R. I. 

1759-1800. 

(Continued from page 249, Vol. i) 



1778. 


Apr. 


24. 


June 


10. 


(( 


13. 


(I 


26. 


July 


9. 


Aug. 


3. 


Sept. 


13. 


u 


26. 


tl 


30. 


Oct. 


2. 


Nov. 


8. 


a 


22. 


ifc 


22. 


Dec. 


8. 


a 


13. 


;c 


21. 


11 


24. 


17' 


^9. 


Jau. 


26. 


Mar. 


rr 


a 


23. 



William Lawtou, Portsmouth, and Sarah Barker 

Micldletown. 
Walter Johnson and Mary Gardner. 
Records Heath and F'rances Wilbour. 
Daniel Lake, Jr., Portsmouth, and Abigail Cook. 
Peleg Brown and Mary Coggeshall, Middletown* 
Joseph Wanton Taylor and Mary Coggeshall. 
Walter Rodman, Newport, and Polly Coggeshall, 

Portsmouth. 
Ambrose Moore and Hannah Scott. 
John Whightman and Elizabeth Jeffries. 
John Tears and Mary Clarke. 
Joseph Rathborn and Comfort Barney. 
Daniel Case and Mary Wing. 
Welcome Purlivent and Hannah Weeden. 
Robert Cornell and Ruth Brown, Middletown. 
George Niglitingail and Ann Childs. 
John Coit and Mary Mumford. 
Thomas Shaw and Ruth Thomas, Portsmouth. 

Aml)rose Clevaeland and Mary Barney. 
Robert Eliot and Martha Burns. 
Wm. Thurston and Mary Rowlong. 



144 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Mar. 28. George Galton, New Haven, and Elizabeth 
Burge, Newport. 
Levi Chase and Elizabeth Born. 
Joseph Hammond and Elizabeth Hefferman. 
Luke Jennings, "Sergt. in Capt. Cromwell's Co. 
of Royal Artillery," and Phebe Lucher. 
James Diskall and Deborah Carr. 
Samuel Thurston and Sarah Coggeshall. 
Edward Fannings and Sarah Green. 
Job Townsend and Martha Cory. 
Adam Miller and Belinda Freebody. 
Benjamin Stanton and Mary Forrister. 
George Robberds and Sarah Chace. 
Lemuel Martin and Hannah Downer. 
Elias Spear and Charity Gibbs. 
Hambleton Sweet and Johanna Jackson. 
John Lawton and Hannah Bill. 
James Mosling and Susannah Weeden. 
Benoni Card, "private Soldier in Col. Wight- 
man's Horse," and Elizabeth Cooper. 
" 15. Lachlan Hay, "gunner, Royal Artillery," and 
Elizabeth Sinclair, "by permission of John Inness, 
Lieut. Commander." 
Nov. 16. Barnard Muchamore and Susanna Sinkins. 

" 18. John Chase, Providence, and Phebe Manchester, 
Portsmouth. 
21. Fones Green and Deborah Champlin. 
28. Thomas Whaley, Richmond, and Eunice Hub- 
bard. 
Dec. 5. John Rogers and Betsey Rodman. 
" 8. Thomas Price and Judith Wilber. 

9. Gideon Anthony and Abigail Cornell, Portsmouth. 
15. Parker Hall and Ruth Chapman. 
*' 18. Paul Slocum, Dartmouth, and Elizabeth Easton. 
18. John Karven and Amey Cranston. 
— Thomas Pratt and Polly Proud. 
" 26. John Albro and Elizabeth Hervey, Portsmouth. 



Apr. 


15. 


ii. 


25. 


a 


27. 


May 


26. 


July 


26. 


ii 


26. 


Aug. 


18. 


<,(, 


15. 


a 


15. 


Sept. 


3. 


u 


5. 


4( 


11. 


ii 


12. 


U 


9. 


il 


15. 


Oct. 


13. 



(( 

(( 









MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 145 

Joseph Allen and Marah Taggart, Middletown. 

Isaac Curtis and Mary Ann Barton. 

La Browning and Seipli Church. 

John Vedner, soldier, and Tarner Cory. 

Henry Millard and Waite Allen. 

Benjamin Lawton and Rachel Cohoone. 

Nicholas Alger and Esther Taylor. 

Peleg Barker, Portsmouth, and Ruth Peabody, 

Little Compton. 

John Bowen and Elizabeth Williams. 

Nicholas Taylor and Catharine Coggeshall. 

Barney Matts and Susanna Heath. 

Samuel Dyre and Mary Durfee, Portsmouth. 

Thomas Vanludiner and Lydia Taylor. 

John Francis Sonbury and Polly Stevens. 

Edward Snell and Richard Munro. 

Fleet Green and Elizabeth Clarke. 

Joseph Ward, Portsmouth, and Elizabeth Biggs, 

Middletown. 

Samuel Carr, Newport, and Damaris Underwood, 

Jamestown. 

Samuel Babcock, Exeter, and Mary Holloway, 

Newport. 

Isaac Evans and Martha Howard. 

Samuel Tripp and Phebe Wing. 

Thomas Weber and Ann Partridge. 

Francis Malboneand Freelove Sophia Tweedy. 

James Congdon, Charlestown, and Rebecca Rider, 

Newport. 
" 7. Benjamin Peckham, Middletown, and Elizabeth 

Card, Newport. 
" 12. John Saacks and Mercv Bennit. 
'• 20. Abraham Howland, '^In the State of Massachu- 
setts," and Elizabeth Hathaway, Portsmouth. 
26. George Sanford, Bristol, and Elizabeth Irish. 
28. James Fitch and Charity Chase. 



1780. 


Jan. 


21. 


Feb. 


14. 


<.<. 


27. 


Mar. 


5. 


a 


5. 


t( 


8. 


u 


14. 


(,<• 


16. 


!,(, 


24. 


Apr. 


15. 


4( 


23. 


(( 


27. 


;( 


30. 


May 


13. 


July 


3. 


Aug. 


1. 


Aug. 


11. 


i( 


24. 


Sept. 


3. 


u 


24. 


Oct. 


1. 


(i 


4. 


ii 


25. 


Nov. 


S. 






146 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Joseph Swinborn and Ann Green. 
Joseph Congdon, Charlestown, and Marj Shear- 
man, Newport. 
John Pearse and Sarah Peckham. 

John Dunham and Sarah Cooper. 
John Fairbanks and Mercy Sibbet. 
William Carter and Dorothy Parmenter. 
William Johnson and Ann Squire. 
James Gouffrau and Elizabeth Emmons. 
James Center and Sarah Ann Howard. 
William Sanford Brown, Providence, and Han- 
nah Daniels, Newport. 
John Bradley and Mary May. 
Peuben Taylor and Abigail Hedley, Portsmouth. 
Joseph Pollin and Sarah Turner. 
William Tomlin and Mary Fowler. 
Joseph Rogers and Patty Hazard. 
Lewis Demontte and Elizabeth Lawton. 
William Petteface and Polly Wickham. 
Samuel Barker and Sarah Smith, Middletown. 
Henry Freeborn and Mary Simpson. 
Samuel Snow, Providence, and Fanny Wanton, 
Newport. 

John Dalman and Ann Hill. 
Caleb Peabody and Ann Hoar. 
William Arnell and Waite Hookey. 
William Craf and Elizabeth Cozzens. 
Samuel Cory and Jamima Cory, Portsmouth. 
Martin Cabellec and Alice Wyatt. 
John Hill and Esther Wasliburn. 
Edward Fitzgerald and Ann Stewart. 
Samuel Hull and Esther Thomas. 
Thomas Howland and Mary Carpenter. 
Gideon Barker and Elizabeth Croade. 
William West and Patience Richmond. 
(To b? continued.) ,^ . xoiT 



Dec. 


10. 


u 


20. 


ii 


31. 


1781. 


Jan. 


9. 


u 


18. 


a 


28. 


Feb. 


1. 


u 


4. 


(.<. 


4. 


ii 


5. 


Mar. 


4. 


a 


15. 


a 


23. 


Apr. 


8. 


!,<, 


19. 


ii 


22. 


a 


22. 


u 


26. 


a 


29. 


May 


9. 


(,1 


24. 


June 


17. 


July 


26. 


b( 


29. 


Aug. 


2. 


wi 


5. 


U 


13. 


u 


J6. 


ii 


16. 


Oct. 


14. 


i(. 


25. 


Nov. 


z. 



Book Notes. 



Publishers and authors wishing a notice in this department should send 
copies of their publications to R. H. Tilley, Newport, R. I. 



A Short History of England for Young People, by Miss E. 
S. Kirkland,has recently been published by A.C.McClurg & Co. of 
Chicago. Young readers of English History will gladly welcome 
the appearance of this Volume. The author has devoted mucii 
time to the collection and sifting of her material, and to the faith- 
fulness of an annalist she adds the discrininative thoughtfalness 
of the philosopher. The work is brought down to 1887, much 
later than any similar history yet published, and it contains 
valuable information of the England of to-day. The volume will 
commend itself to those of older years who want a complete history 
of limited proportions, and it will serve as a good index for more 
extensive reading of those who have the time and inclination to 
follow English history in all its details. Cloth, $1.25. 

With the Admiral of the Ocean Sea, is the title of a new 
work on the discover}' of America. Mr. Charles Paul MacKie, 
the author, deals only with the accounts left by Columbus himself 
and those directly associated with him in the enterprise which 
placed him among the prominent men of his time. The Spanish 
form of the admiral's name, Christoval Colon, as being more in 
keeping with the spirit of the narrative, is used throughout the 
work in place of the anglicized Christopher Columbus. The 
appendix contains a few notes upon points in dispute concerning 
Columbus and his career. At this time, when everything relating 
to the discovery of America is interesting, this work should find a 
place in every librar}', not simply because of its historical worih, 
but because the story of Columbus is told in a way that must hold 
the readers attention until the last pao;es are reached, thus making 
him familiar with the first liistorical event in the history of 
America. Chicago, 1891. A. C. McClurg &Co., $1.75. 

St. Johnsbury Illustrated, — An attempt, and by no means an 
unsuccessful one, is made in this work to introduce the town of 
St. Johnsbury, Vermont, to the people of New England. The 
book is handsomely gotten up, printed on heav}' plate paper, and 
contains an interesting description of St. Johnsbury and vicinity. 
The frontispiece is a birds-eye view of the village showing its 
streets, and surrounding hills. It also contains portraits of prom- 



148 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

inent business men, pictures of the principal business places and 
numerous illustrations of local topics. Mr. Arthur F. Stone, the 
compiler, of the firm of C. M. Stone and Company, publishers of 
the St. Johnsbury Caledonian, is entitled to much credit in present- 
ing so neat a volume. 50c. and $1.00. 

Glimpses of Pilgrim Plymouth, is the title of a book containing 
forty-eight views in Photogravure from photographs and paintings, 
showing the Plymouth of 1620 and the Plymouth of to-day. These 
are accompanied by extracts of descriptive history which add 
much to the value of the book. The growing interest in Ply- 
moutli and the Pilgrims has brought the souvenir of Pilgrim days 
into prominence, and it seems to have been the desire of the pub- 
lisher to produce something beyond the ordinary seaside advertise- 
ment which every season are sent out. This is one of the most 
interesting books we have seen for a long time, and whatever its 
popularity may be in the village of its birth, it, is certain of a large 
sale in all New England where the Pilgrim Fathers are held in the 
highest honor. The artist has brought thought, patience, investi- 
gation and enthusiasm to his aid in the beautiful volume. This 
book is 8x10 inches in size, printed on heavy paper, and is stitched 
with silk ribbon. Cloth $1.75. A. S. Burbank, Plymouth, Mass. 

History of the Manufacture of Iron in all ages, by James M. 
Swank. This is the second and last edition of an exceedingly 
interesting and valuable work on the Manufacture of Iron in ail 
ages, and particularly in the United States from colonial times to 
1891. Although iron ere in this country was first discovered in 
North Carolina, and the manufacture of iron was first undertaken 
in Virginia, the first successful iron works were established in the 
province of Massachusetts Bay. In 1632 mention is made by 
Morton of the existence of "iron stone" in New England, and in 
November, 1637, the General Court of Massachusetts granted to 
Abraham Shaw one half of the benefit of any "coles of iron stone 
which shall be found in any common ground which is in the 
countryes disposeing." Iron ore was discovered in the flat meadows 
on the upper parts of the Saugus river, near Lynn, soon after its 
settlement in 1629, and in 1642 specimens were taken to London 
by Robert Bridges in the hope that a company might be formed 
for the manufacture of iron. This hope was soon realized in the 
formation of "The Company of Undertakers for the Iron Works", 
consisting of eleven English gentlemen who advanced £1000 to 
establish the works. Two chapters of the book are devoted to 
the history of the iron works in the New England Colonies, giving 
man}^ interesting facts relating to the business in the several 
states. One volume, Royal Octavo, 574 pages, sold only at the 
office of the American Iron and Steele Association, 261 South 
Fourth street, Philadelphia. $7.50. 



'i[kGklim OfJ\(eW ^NGLANDjflSTORY 

Vol. 2. July, 1892. No. 3. 

Early Education in New England. 

FREE COMMON SCHOOLS. 



BY HON. THOMAS AV. BICKNELL, BOSTON, MASS. 

The pree Scl^ool Principle. 

HE discoverer of the principle of the free Common 
School for all classes and both sexes of children is 
now unknown. Some claim him to have been a Greek 
who lived in the pre-Christian time. Others ascribe 
the honor to England, while others still make strong claim 
for German, French, and even Roman oi'igin. Whatever 
the views of theorists and stif dents may be, certain it is that 
the free Common School idea of New England had birth on 
our own soil, and that all prior attempts were but embryonic 
developments in preparation for the fullfledged offspring of 
our original democratic institutions. In its final analysis, 
the free school is an institution established and sup- 
ported by a general tax of the State, in which every child, 
without distinction of race, sex, color, property or any other 
condition, may obtain a common school education, without a 
special tax on the parents or guardians for the care and 
tuition of such child. 

{Reasons for its ^^ew England Birtl^. 
The Pilgrim and Puritan settlers of New England came 
from the most intelligent population then known to the 




150 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

world. England had its ancient endowed schools for the 
better classes, and the educational standards were of the 
highest order extant The Schools and the Universities of 
England were the sources of her power and her supremacy 
in the seventeenth century, and the awakening of discovery, 
the arts, science and religion was due to a revival of 
learning as its chief stimulus. The Anglo Saxon mind is as 
fond of knowledge as it is of material power. One is the con- 
dition of the other, as well as its hand-maid. Given knowl- 
edge and power must follow. Given power and its continued 
possession rests on knowledge. The earlj^ settlers came to 
America out of the restless, social and political life of Eng- 
land in the year 1620. Few of the first comers were educated 
people, though all could read and write, and though their 
chirography was not of the most elegant style, yet to the 
compact in the Mayflower, not one person made his mark. 
All could read the Bible and write legibly. It was the 
English instinct and intuition that suggested, that in a new 
land, free from old traditions, the people should all be 
intelligent in some large measure, in order that the equality 
of the social status and order should be preserved. They did 
not care to establish the English feudal sj^stem on New 
England soil. The evils of an hereditary system of rank and 
wealth were too apparent to be' repeated here. They had 
suffered too much from kings, lords, and nobles to desire to 
build up an aristocracy of any sort except it were an 
aristocracy of intelligence and virtue. The most reasonable 
desire of their hearts then was that their children should 
have a common heritage of knowledge, although their 
worldly possessions were small. The satisfaction of leariiing 
would compensate for the loss of the comforts and blessings 
of the homeland, as well as for the privations and toils of 
their adopted country. Out of such conditions and thoughts 
sprang the common school idea of the families of this 
American State. 

pirst Schools 19 j^ew Englapd not pree Scl^ools. 

The first historical school in New England was founded 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. . 151 

in Boston, under the name of the free latin, or latin 
GRAMMAR SCHOOL OF BOSTON on the 13th day of April 
1635, in a vote of the townsmen, "entreating Mr. Philemon 
Parmont to become schoolmaster for the teaching and 
nurturing of children." On the 22nd of August, 1636, a 
subscription was started, "at a general meeting of the richer 
inhabitants" at which about £50 "was given towards the 
maintenance of a free schoolmaster for the youth with us, — 
Mr. Daniel Maud being now also chosen thereto." "This 
school," says Dr. Barnard, "was the lineal descendant of the 
old Free Schools or Grammar School, or Latin Grammar 
School in England, — the connecting link between the public 
schools, (in the original use of the term) of Old and New 
England — the hearth-stone of classical learning in both 
countries." 

It was the early practice of the Massachusetts towns to 
endow the schools by lands rented on long leases, by bequests, 
and donations. In 16C5, the General Court of Massachusetts 
granted several tracts of land, together with several Islands 
in the Bay, to the town of Boston: and in 1637, a grant of 
thirty acres of land at Muddy Brook, before assigned by 
them to Mr. Purmont was confirmed. In 1641, "its ordered 
that Deare Island shall be improved for the maintenance of a 
Free School for the Towji, and such other occasions as the 
Townsmen for the time being shall think meet, the sayd 
school being sufficiently provided for," The island was leased 
in 1644, for three years for the use of the school, at 7 pounds 
per annum, and again in 1647, for 7 years for 14 pounds per 
annum, "for the schools use in provision ai^d clothing." At 
Braintree, 500 acres of land, were leased for forty shillings 
per annum for the use of the school. 

The first town school in Dorchester was established in 
May, 1619. It was styled a Grammar School for instruction 
in "English, Latin, and other tongues," and was partially 
supported out of an endowment in the lands of Thompson's 
Island. The occupants of these lands were assessed a "rent 



152 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of 20 pounds 3^early," towards the maintenance of a school, 
and was to be paid "to such a schoolmaster as shall undertake 
to teach English,Latin, and other tongues,and also writeing," 
and the seven [select] men were to decide fi'om time to 
time whether the "majdes shall be taught with the boys or 
not." 

Beyond the proceeds of the endowment arising from rents, 
gifts, etc., the teacher of this original "free school," was paid 
a certain sum or rate by the parents for each pupil in attend- 
ance. Often times the teacher received a part of his salary 
in produce, as in Dorchester the record goes that Mr. 
Ichabod Wisner received for rent or tuition "4 bushels of 
Indian Corn from Mr. Patten, 2 of Ensign Foster, and peas 
of Arthur Brecks." The custom also prevailed in Dorches- 
ter of assessing the cost of fuel on "them who send their 
children to school." In 1688 it was provided that "those who 
send to the school shall bring for each child a load of wood." 
If the parents did not supply the wood or pay the tax for 
fuel before the 29th of October, annually, their children 
could have "no privilege of the fire." 

The town of Salem was astir in educational matters as 
early as 1628. Then Governor Craddock urged Mr. Endicott 
"to train up some of the Indian children to reading and 
religion," and it is a singular fact that this is the first his- 
torical reference to education in New England and relates to 
the instruction of the children of Indians. There are hints 
at schools and teachers at Salem from this date till Jan., 
1640, when the following record appears, "A generall town 
meeting — young Mr. Norris chose by this Assembly to teach 
school." In 1641, March 30, Col. Endicott "moved about the 
fences and about a free skoole, and therefore wished a town 
meeting about it." The nature of this "free skoole" may be 
inferred from the following records under date of Sept. 30, 
1644, "ordered that a note be published in the next lecture 
day, that such as have children to be kept at schoole, would 
bring in their names, and what they will give for one whole 
year, and also, that if any poore-body hath children or a 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 153 

child to be put to school and not able to pay for their school- 
ing, that the town will pay it by a rate," The parents or 
guardians who were able to pay for the tuition of their 
children did so by voluntary contribution or by rate bills and 
only the children of the very poor were kept at school at 
public expense. 

The first school in Rhode Island of which we have a public 
record was kept at Newport in 1640. Rev. Robert Lenthal, 
a church of England clergyman, was called to Weymouth, 
Mass., to be the pastor of a church there, but he left Massa- 
chusetts for some ecclesiastical trouble and was admitted as 
a freeman in the Rhode Island Colony, August 6, 1640. The 
following vote appears on the public records of the Colony. 
"And August 20, Mr. Lenthal was ,by vote, called to keep a 
public school for the learning of youth, and for his encour- 
agement there was granted to him and his heirs, one hundred 
acres of land, and four more for a house lot; it was also 
voted that one hundi'ed acres should be laid forth and appro- 
priated for a school, for the encouragement of the poorer 
sort, to train up their youth in learning, and Mr. Robert 

Lentlial, wliile he continues to teach school, is to have the 
benefit thereof." Callendar, in his Historical address says 
"this gentleman did not tarry very long; I find him gone to 
England the next year but one." One of the most noted of 
the early " public schools" was the Free School at Roxbury, 
established between 1642 and 1645, Rev. Thomas Welde, the 
first minister of Roxbury, and sixty others, entered into an 
agreement to assess their estates for certain sums to be paid 
annually, forever, ''for the support of a free school for the 
education of their children in literature," "to fit them for 
public service in church and commonwealth in succeeding 
ages." 

In VVinthrop's Journal under date of 1645, he says, "Divers 
free schools were erected as at Roxbury (for maintenance 
whereof every inhabitant bounds some house or land for a 
yearly allowance or forever) and at Boston, where they made 
an order to allow forever X50 to the master and a house, 



154 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

and £80 to an iislier, who should also teach th(3m to read, 
and write and cypher, as Indian children were to be taught 
freely and the charge to be by yearly contributions, either by 
voluntary allowance or by rate of such as refused, etc., and 
this order was confirmed by General Court.'* 

From all these references it appears that the early schools 
of New England were only in part, what their name would 
indicate /ree schools. The support of the teachers and other 
expenses of the schools were borne by proceeds of rentals of 
lands, by gifts, by contributions of parents, and by a public 
tax or rate for the children of the poor, or for those who 
refused to pay their proportion of the cost of the school. 
This practice continued in Massachusetts, more or less, till 
1768, when the education of all the children was made 
absolutely free by a town tax, assessed on all the property 
of the town, and the children of the rich and the poor equally 
enjoyed the advantages thereof. In Rhode Island and Con- 
necticut and the other New England States the rate bill 
continued to be a part of the income for the support of the 
schools until a period within the memory of men now living, 
many of whom ha\^e had a share in removing it and in 
making our common schools, free schools in fact, although 
they have borne that name since the foundation of the 
icolonies. 

,Y,ifjd Earlg Scl^ool liegislation. 

Miij '^^Q honor of establishing the Common School system of 
^'th^TFhited States by legislation belongs to the commonwealth 
■of Massachusetts. The first law making education universal 
'*'^as passed by the General Court, June 14, 1642, at a session 
' c'alied to consider "the great neglect in many parents and 
'-• Piasters in training up their children in learning." 

^ri^vKl-,..-/,;^^^! .a^M Ordinance of 1642. 

,,.,( That. in ey.ery tp-wn the chosen men appointed for managing the pru- 
dential affairs of the same shall henceforth stand charged with the care of 
^'thfeVedress of this evil ; arid for this end they shall have power to take 
■ ' account from time to time • of their parents and masters, and of their 
children, concerning their callingj and employment of their children, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 155 

especially of their ability to read and understand the principles of religion 
and the capital laws of the country, and to impose lines upon all those 
who refuse to render such account to them when required ; and they 
shall have power to put forth apprentices the children of such as they 
shall find not to be able and fit to employ and bring them up. 

The act of 1647 made the support of public schools com- 
pulsory, and education universal and free to all, though it 
was not compulsory in obliging the attendance of all children 
nor did it raise the funds for their support by public taxation. 
As this was the first law of its kind in the world, it is pub- 
lished entire. 

Massac HusETTvS Okdinance of 1647. 

It being one chiefe project of that ould deluder, Satan, to keepe men 
from the knowledge of the Scriptures, as in former times by keeping 
them in an unknown- tongue, so in these latter times by persuading from 
the use of tongues, that so at least the true sence and meaning of the 
originall might be clouded by false glosses of saint seeming deceivers, 
that learning may not be buried in the grave of our fathers in the Church 
and Commonwealth, the Lord assisting our endeavors : — 

It is therefore ordered, that every township in this jurisdiction, after 
the Lord hath increased them to the number of 5o householders, shall 
then forthwith appoint one within their towne to teach all such children 
as shall resort to him to write and reade, whose wages shall be paid 
either by the parents or masters of such children, or by the inhabitants 
in generall, by way of supply, as the major part of those that order the 
prudentials of the towne shall appoint ; Provided, those that send their 
children be not oppressed by paying much more than they can have them 
taught in other townes ; — 

And it is further ordered that whei'e any towne shall increase to the 
number of loo families or householders they shall set up a grammar 
schoole, tlie master thereof being able to instruct youth so farr as they 
may be fitted for the university, Provided, that if any towne neglect the 
performance hereof above one yeare, every such town shall pay 5s to the 
next schoole till they shall perform this order. 

Lord Macauley called the attention of Parliament and all 
England to this noble document, declaring it to be worthy of 
the wisest men of aiYj- age. 

In 1683 all towns in Massachusetts Colony were required 
to maintain two gi'ammar schools and two Ayriting schools. 

In the Constitution adopted in 1780, it Avas declared to be 
"the duty of legislators and magistrates, in all future periods 
of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature 
and the sciences, and all seminaries of them, especially the 



% 



156 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

University at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools 
in the town." 

The earliest notice of schools in the records of Plymouth 
Colony is under date of 1663, as follows : 

''It is proposed by the Court with the several townships of 
this jurisdiction, as a thing that they ought to take into their 
serious consideration, that some course may be taken that in 
every town there may be a schoolmaster set up to train up 
children to reading and writing." At a General Court held 
March 4, 1670, a grant was made of "all such proffets as 
might or should annually accrew or grow dear to this 
collonie from time to time, for fishing with netts or saines 
at Cape Cod for mackerell, basse, or herrings, to be imployed 
and improved for and towards ?ifree school in some town in 
this jurisdiction, for the training up of youth in literature for 
the good and benefit of posteritie, provided a beginning were 
made within one year." In 1691, after the union of the two 
colonies, Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth, it was enacted 
"that every town within this province, having the number 
of fifty householders or upwards shall be constantly provided . 
of a schoolmaster to teach children and youth to read and 
write," and "there shall also be a grammar school set up in 
every town" of one hundred families or householders, "and 
some discreet person of good conversation, well instructed in 
the tongues procured to keep such school. Every such 
schoolmaster to be suitably encouraged and paid by the in- 
habitants." 

Any town neglecting this order was to be fined ten pounds 
and in 1701, it being found that the law was "shamefully 
neglected by divers towns," "tending greatly to the nourish- 
ment of ignorance and irreligion," the penalty was made 
twenty pounds per annum for such neglect,and the following 
provisions were added: 

1st. "That every grammar school-master be approved by 
the minister of the town, and the ministers of the two next 
adjacent towns, or any two of them by certificate under 
their hand." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 157 

2nd. "That no minister of any town shall be deemed, held 
or accepted to be the schoolmaster of such town within the 
intent of the law." 

The legislation of the Massachusetts colonies became prac- 
tically that of the Connecticut Colonies, while Rhode Island 
followed her sister colonies slowly in matters educational, 
either in legislation or in practice. 

f4arvarcl College. 

The most important and far reaching single act of the 
early New England settlers for the establishment and en- 
couragement of Education, in perpetuo^ was the foundation 
of Harvard College, at Cambridge, then Newtown, Mass. In 
1636, the General Court of Massachusetts Bay "agreed to 
give X400 toward a school or college, whereof X200 to be 
paid next year, and X200 when the work is finished, and the 
next Court to appoint when and what building." The great 
significance of this grant will be better understood if we 
remember that the total white population of the ten or 
twelve towns making this gift or grant did not exceed five 
thousand persons, and that the sum appropriated was greater 
than the whole tax for the Colony for a single jear. But the 
men of greatest influence in Boston, We}' mouth, Salem, 
Newtown, Watertown and Dorchester, were the educated 
clergy, who were determined that learning should not be 
"buried in the graves of the fathers in Church and Common- 
wealth." Dr.Increase Mather Avrote; "The ends for which our 
fathers did chiefly erect a college in New England were that 
so scholars might there be educated for the service of Christ 
and his churches in the work of the University, and that they 
might be seasoned in their tender years with such principles 
as brought their blessed progenitors into this wilderness. 
There is no one thing of greater concernment to these 
churches, in present and after times than the prosperity of 
that society. They cannot subsist without a college." In 
1637, Governor Winthrop and the Ministers of Boston were 
appointed by the General Court ''to take order for a college," 
which was located at Newtown, the name of which was 



158 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

changed to Cambridge, in honor of the University, where 
most of the leading colonists had been educated. In 1638, 
Rev. John Harvard, who came to Charlestown, Mass., in 
1637, gave by his will £779. 17s. 2p. in money, and more 
than three hundred volumes of books, for which his name 
was given to the college. Of Mr. Harvard, history knows 
but little except the facts already stated, but his munificent 
gifts have made his name renowned throughout the world. 
He lived in the Colony but a few months, but he has left a 
name for immortality. 

The first class at Harvard was formed in 1638, under Mr. 
Eaton, of whom it is said that he disgraced his calling as a 
teacher of the "school in Cambridge," by a bad temper, 
severe discipline and short commons. Rev. Henry Dunster, 
the first president, after fourteen years of valuable service 
was indicted by the Grand Jury for disturbing the ordinance 
of infant baptism by preaching a sermon on antipedohaptism 
at Cambridge. Receiving his sentence, he resigned his office 
and died in 1655, Some of the rules governing students 
were these : ''They shall honor, as their pai-ents, the magis- 
trates, elders and tutors and all who are older than them- 
selves." *Tf any student shall violate the law of God and of 
this college,either from perverseness.or from gross negligence, 
after he shall have been twice admonished, he may he whipped 
if not an adult," etc. "No scholar shall buy, sell, or ex- 
change anything of the value of sixpence, without the ap- 
probation of his parent, guardian or tutor." "The scholars 

shall never use their mother tongue, except in public exer- 
cises of oratory or such like." 

The College has had its vicissitudes of successes, trials, 
prosperity and adversity, but for moie than two and one half 
centuries. Harvard has stood as the best representative of 
the higher education of American quality, and the professions 
as well as business and common life have a great debt of 
gratitude to pay to the founders of the State, who saw the 
needs of a good college and provided better than they then 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 159 

thought or knew for generations beyond their largest ex- 
pectations. 

Studies, Books, l^ales, etc., of Early Schools. 

Reading and writing were the principal subjects taught in 
the first common schools of New England, the Bible being 
the text book in reading. One pupil tells us that he had 
read his Bible through thrice before he was seven years old. 
The New England Primer and Dilworth's Spelling Book 
were also used. The master set sums in Mss. books, but did 
not go further then the Rule of Three. 

''In the town of Swanzey, in 1678, it was voted nem. con. 
that a school be forthwith setup in this Town for the teaching 
of Grammar, Rhetoric and Arithmetic, and the tongues of 
Latin, Greek and Hebrew, also to read English and to write, 
and that a salary of <£40 per annum in current county pay, 
which passeth from man to man, be duly paid from time to 
time, and at all times hereafter to the schoolmaster thereof, 
and that Mr. John Myles, the present pastor of the Church 
here assembling be the schoolmaster, otherwise to have power 
to dispose the same to an able schoolmaster during the said 
pastor's life." 

"It is further ordered that said school shall be only free to 
such children whose parents pay any rates towards the said 
school, and to none other, and that the schoolmaster and suc- 
cessive schoolmasters thereof for the time being shall have 
liberty to take in any other scholars they think fit to be 
educated there, and every scholar at first entrance shall pay 
twelve pence in silver towards buying books for the said 
school." . 

In 1680, Rehoboth "had a treaty with Mr. Edward Howard 
to teach school" at "twenty pounds a year in county pay and 
his diet, besides what the Court doth allow in that case." 
In 1699, Rehoboth agreed with Thomas Robinson "to keep a 
readings and writin Of school for tlie term of three months to 
begin the fii'st or second week in April at the farthest, and 
for his labo]' he is to have three pounds, one half in silver 



160 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 



money," *'tlie last part of his pay iji corn equivalent to 
money." 

The same year Thomas Dickson engaged "to do his utmost 
endeavour to teach both sexes of boys and girls to read 
English and write and cast accounts," to be paid ''one half in 
silver money and one half in good merchantable boards, at 
the current and merchantable price." 

In November, 1644, an order was passed by the General 
Court, desiring each family to give a peck of corn or a shilling 
in cash to the treasury of Harvard College. 

A writer in 1643, remarks, ''By the side of the 'Colledge 
is a faire grammar schoole,' for the training up of young 
scholars, and fitting them for academical learnings, and as 
they are judged ripe, they may be received into the college." 

The town of Cambridge makes reference to a School Com- 
mittee in the following vote passed in 1644, "that the towns- 
men see>to the educating of children, and that the town be 
divided into six parts, and a person appointed for each 
division to take care of all the families it contained." 

The size of the school-houses and the pay of teachers in 
Newton, are indicated by the following votes passed 1699, 
Voted to build a school house, sixteen feet by fourteen before 
the last of November. 

Voted that the school-house be set in the highway near to 
Joseph Bartlett's, and agreed with Staples to keep the school 
one month, four days in a week for =£1, 4s. Another record 
states that the town gave Mr. Staples one shilling and six- 
pence per day. 

The rate bills were apportioned to the pupils according to 
the studies pursued, and in the town of Newton, it was 
voted "that those that send children to school, shall pay three 
pence per week for those who learn to read, and four pence 
for those that learn to write and cipher; and all may send to 
either school as they choose." Dea. Staples referred to above 
was so deeply interested in the education of a godly and 
learned ministry that he made the following provision in his 
will: 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 161 

"John Staples Craft, son of Moses Craft, shall be brought 
up to learning, so far as to fit and prepare him for the minis- 
try of the Gospel, if he be capable of learning and is willing 
to do it; but if he cannot learn, or is not willing and free to 
learn, he shall have £400 in money, when he shall have come 
to the age of twenty one 3^ears." 

Boston Latin School. 

The Boston Latin School which had its foundation laid in 
a vote of the town passed in 1635, has had a very interesting 
history, a few scraps of which must suffice here. 

In 1650, the town voted ''that Mr. Woodmansey, ye 
schoolmaster shall have fifty pounds per an. for his teaching 
ye schollers and his proportion to be made up by rate." 

In 1666, he had an assistant to "teach children to write," 
at a salary of X40 a year. Mr. Woodmansey probably used 
the school-house as his residence, for after his death, it was 
voted in 1669, "to give notice to Mrs. Woodmansey that the 
towne occasions need the use of the school-house, we do 
desire her to provide otherwise for herself." It was also 
voted "to allow her eight pounds per annum for that end 
during her widdowhood." 

Ezekiel Cheever was the great light among Boston school- 
masters, coming from London to New Haven, thence to 
Charlestown, and from there to Boston in 1670, when the 
keys of the Latin School were placed in his hands and a 
salary of sixty pounds a year for his services. Like Gold- 
smitli's Village Schoolmaster, undoubtedly, "A man severe 
he was and stern to view," yet as his biographer say he had 
"an agreeable mixture of majesty and sweetness, both in 
his voice and in his countenance." Of his discipline we 
ma}^ form an idea from a manual of a school code then 
in general use. 

The Schoolmaster to his Scholars. 

"My child and scholar take good heed, 

Unto the words that are here set, 
And see thou do accordingly, 

Or else be sure thou shalt be beat. 



162 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

First, I command thee God to serve, 

Then to thy parents duly yield, 
Unto all men be courteous. 

And mannerly in town and field. 

Your clothes unbuttoned do not use, 

Let not your hose ungartered be; 
Have handkerchief in readiness, 

Wash hands and face, or see not me. 

Lose not your books, inkhorns or pens. 

Nor girdle, garters, hat or band. 
Let shoes be tyed, pin shirt-band close, 

Keep well your hands at any hand. 

If broken hosed or shoed you go. 

Or slovenly in your array. 
Without a girdle or intrust. 

Then you and I must have a fray." 

Several more verses add to the duties and the perils of a 
school boy's life in Master Cheever's day in Boston. Mr. 
Cheever was the most noted author as well as teacher of his 
time, for he composed "The Accidence, a short introduction 
to the Latin Tongue," which prior to 1790, had passed 
through 20 editions and was the hand book of most Latin 
students in New England. This book was called "The 
Wonder of the Age," by "the Famous Ezekiel Cheever." 
President Quincy of Harvard College, said of it; "It is dis- 
tinguished for simplicity, comprehensiveness and exactness; 
and as a primer or first elementary book, I do not believe it 
^s exceeded by any other work." 

In 1687, Mr. Clieever says of himself that "after your poor 
petitioner hath nearly fifty years been employed in the work 
and office of a public Grammar School-Master," "I still con- 
tinue my wonted abilities of mind, health of body, vivacity 
of spirit and delight in my work." He died "on Saturday 
morning, August 21, 1708, in the ninety-fourth year of his 
age, after he had been a skilful, painful, faithful schoolmaster 
for seventy years, and had the singular favor oi Heaven, that 
though he had usefully spent his life among children, yet he 
was not become twice a child, hut held his abilities, in an 
unusual degree to the very last," says Dr. Cotton Mather. 

Another tells us that he wore a long white beard, termi- 



MAGAZINE OE^ NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 163 

natiiig in a point; that, when he stroked his beard to the 
point, it was a signal for the boys to stand clear." 

Governor Hutchinson says that Mr. Cheever was the 
schoolmaster of most of the principal men of Boston, who 
were then upon the stage. "He is not the only master who 
kept his lamp longer lighted than otherwise it would have 
been by a supply of oil from his scholars." 

Master Lovell, a successor of Cheever in the Boston Latin 
School "was a tyrant and his system one of terror" says his 
biographer. Trouncing was common, and was performed by 
stripping a boy, mounting him on another's back and whip- 
ping him with birch rods before the whole school. A boy 
had played truant, and Master Lovell had declared publicly 
that the offender should be trounced. When such a sentence 
was pronounced, it was understood that the other boys might 
seize the culprit and take him to school by force. He was 
soon seized and hurried to tlie master who inflicted the pun- 
ishment without delay. On his way home, the bo}^ culprit 
was met by another who cried out, "Oh John Brown, you'll 
git it when you go to school." "No, I shan't, said the boy, 
who felt that he had got the start of them, "iV^o 1 shan't for 
Tve got it now^^^ and as he said this he slapped his hand on the 
part that had paid the penalty, "suiting the action to the 
word." 

"O the Caitiffs," said another teacher, "it is good for 

them." Not only was the birch applied freely to the back as 
in trouncing, but with the ferule the birch was applied to the 
hands and upon the soles of the feet, the most refined and 
severe punishment of all. For pronouncing the P. in 
Ptolemy, Sam Bradford, afterward Sheriff, was rapped over 
the head with a heavy ferule. James Lovell was so beaten by 
his grandfather, John, that the father rose and said "Sir, 3^ou 
have flogged that boy enough." The boy went away to go 
to Master Proctor's school, but was told that he would fare 
worse there. 

Of the early schoolhouses, very little can be said of their 
comforts or conveniences. Radely built, located near the 
centre of the district on the triangle where three ways parted, 
or on the corner angle of two roads, sparely furnished with 



164 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

long wooden benches and desks, heatecifrom open fire places 
at the end of the room opposite the door, so far as it could be 
said to have been lieated at all, the wood for fuel furnished 
by the patrons of the school in lieu of money for the support 
of the school, the fires built by the larger boys, and the house 
swept and otherwise kept clean by the larger girls, — these 
were some of the conditions of that early school life of our 
ancestors two centuries ago. In fact, matters had but little 
altered in the early part of this century for Edward Everett 
in an address at Faneuil Hall, Boston, in 1855, speaks thus 
of the "old school house" of 1804. ''It contained but one 
room, heated in the winter by an iron stove, which sent up a 
funnel into a curious brick chimney, built down from the 
roof, in the middle of the room, to within seven or eight feet 
of the floor, being like Mahomets coffin, held in the air to the 
roof by bars of iron. The boys had to take their turns, in 
winter, in coming early to the school-house, to open it, to 
make a fire-, sometimes of wet logs and a very inadequte sup- 
ply of other combustibles, to sweep out the room, and, if 
need be, to shovel a path through the snow to the street. 
These were not very fascinating duties for an urchin of ten 
or eleven ; but we lived through it, and were perhaps not 
the worse for having to turn our hands to these little offices." 

The first truant school established in fact in America, 
originated in the following vote in Salem, Mass., Dec, 1673. 
''As five men neglected to have their children instructed and 
brought up to some useful calling, our selectmen advertise 
that such children should be put out to service." 

A reference to the Hornbook will close this somewhat 
rambling article. This book was a simpler book for beginners 
than the New England Primer which in its later editions 
contained the catechisms of John Cotton and that of the 
Westminster Assembly. The hornbook was so called on 
on account of its horn cover, which rendered it indestructible 
from without. Shakespeare calls it the "teacher of boys" in his 
time, and it was used in Massachusetts and other parts of 
New England a little over a hundred years ago. "He does 
jiot know his hornbook," was equivalent to "he does not know 
his letters." A single book would often serve two or three 
generations of children of the same family, so carefully were 
those early text books used and handed down from parents 
to children. But facts enough have been given to show from 
what small beginnings our present efficient public school 
system has sprung. 



The United Company of Spermaceti Chandlers, 

1761. 



BY GEORGE C. MASON, NEWPORT, R. I. 




URING the middle of the last century and up to the 
time when the leading men of Newport, R. I., were 
driven from their homes by the British, the town was 
noted for the extent and excellence of its Spermaceti 
Works. The fishermen of Rhode Island, following the lead 
of those of Nantucket, pursued and captured whales in open 
boats; but when it was seen that more might be made out of 
the calling, vessels were fitted out and pushed their way as 
far as the Faulkland Islands in pursuit of whales. Aaron 
Lopez, a wealthy merchant of Newport, took the initiative, 
and with those who were associated with him he realized 
large returns. Jacob Rods Rivera who died in Newport, 
Feby. 18, 1789, Avas one of the successful men engaged in the 
trade. He was the first person to engage in the manufacture, 
having required a knowledge of the business in Portugal 
before coming to America. No less than seventeen manu- 
tories were in operation in Newport at one time, and up to 
the Revolution, Newport enjoyed almost a monopoly of the 
trade. The number of vessels engaged in the fishery at that 
time is not known, but we can form some estimate of the 
extent of the calling from the fact that seventeen 'whalemen 
returned to Newport in June and July of 1774, called 
home, no doubt in anticipation of war. 

The manufactures between 1760 and 1770, in Providence, 
Boston and Newport, were as follows : 



1G6 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Providence : Obediali, Nicholas, Joseph, John and Moses 
Brown ; composing the house of Obediah Brown & Co. 

Boston : Thomas Flucker, Nath., Gorham, James Palmer, 
Richard Cranch and Wm. Belcher; of the firm of Richard 
Cranch & Co. 
And the following firms in Newport, R. I. : 

William Thomas, Joseph Robinson, William Richardson ; 
of the firm of Thomas Robinson & Co. 

Rivera & Co. : Henry Collins, Jacob Rods Rivera. 

Isaac Stell & Co. : John Mawdsley, Isaac Stell, and John 
Slocum. 

Nephtali Hart & Co. : Nephtali, Samuel and Isaac Hart. 

Aaron Lopez, Thomas Lopez, each on his own account, 
and Edward Langdon & Son. 

There was also a manufactory of some extent in Philadel- 
phia. 

In 1761 a trust was formed to regulate the trade, and 
articles of agreement were drawn and signed, on the 5th of 
November, by all of the above named, with the exception of 
Moses Lopez and the Philadelphians, and were known as the 
''United Company of Spermaceti Chandlers." The establish- 
ments already in operation were enough to work all the head 
matter brought into New England, and the members engaged 
to do all in their power, by fair and honorable m.eans, to 
prevent the setting up of any new Spermaceti works. XIO 
Sterling was established as the price of head matter, and the 
members engaged to receive head matter from the following 
named persons, the only buyers and factors recognized by 
the United Company: 

John and Wm. Roach, Sylvanus Hassey Co., Folger & 
Gardner, Robert & Josiah Barker, Obed Hussey, Richard 
Mitchell and Jonathan Burdick, all of Nantucket : Benjiimin 
Mason, Newport ; George Jackson, Providence ; and Henry 
Llovd, Boston. 

All head matter brought into the market after the date of 
the agreement, was considered common stock, whether the 



i 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 167 

vessels in which it was taken were owned by members of the 
Company or not, and it was divided by the factors in the 
following proportions : out of every 100 barrels, Nicholas 
Brown & Co., 20; Joseph Palmer & Co., 14; Thomas Robin- 
son & Co., 12; Aaron Lopez, 11; Rivera & Co., 11; Isaac 
Stell & Co., 9; Naphtali Hart & Co., 9; Philadelphia House, 
7; Edward Langdon & Son, 4; Moses Lopez, 2. 

There were other persons in Newport engaged in the same 
business, but in a small way. The agreement entered into 
by the above named manufactures, was as follows: 

AGREEMENT. 

"It is Proposed by Richard Cranch & Co., to all the other Manufacturers 
of Spermaceti Candles within the Limits of New England in North 
America ; That in order to promote their and our Mutual Interest and 
advantage, We will all unite in the following articles of Agreement. Viz: 

ist. That we will all unite ourselves for the full term of seventeen 

Kallendar Months from and after the Date hereof (that is until the Fifth 

day of April, 1763) into one General Body, by the Name of "77z^ United 
Company of Spermaceti C/ia?i dlers^', hy which Name we will Respectively 

own and Acknowledge each other as Members. 

2nd. That we will Respectively send positive Orders to our respective 
Buyers of Headmatter, not to give for Head more than Six Pounds 
Sterling, pr. Ton above the Price of Common Merchantable Spermaceti 
Body Brown oil which Said Orders Shall not be Forwarded to our 
Respective Buyers 'till after the fifth Day of April next. 

3d. That the Current Price of said Common Merchantable Spermaceti 
Body Brown Oil Shall at all Times be Determined by the Current Price 
given by the Merchants of Boston for the London Market at the day the 
Purchaser Receives any Headmatter. But in case there be no Current 
Price Settled at that Day by the Merchants afforesaid, then the next 
Following Current Price by them given for Such Oil Shall govern the 
price of Said Headmatter. 

4th. That we will not at any Time, within Said Term, by any Means, 
either Directly or Indirectly by Present, Promises or Otherways give for 
Headmatter more than Six Pound Sterling pr. Ton above the Price of 
such Common Oil as afforesaid nor receive any at a greater Difference, 
which said Price of Said Oil Shall be Assertained as afforesaid. Nor will 
we either of us Receive any Headmatter which is acknowledged by the 
Seller to be PreEngaged. 

5th. That we will not at any time, within Said Term, by any means, 
directly or Indirectly, either by Presents, Promises or Otherwise give 
more than two and half p c. Commissions to any Person or Persons for 
buying Head Matter for us, neither will we by any Ways or means receive 



168 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

any Head matter at any greater price or cost to us than Two and half 
p c. (Considered as Commissions or Otherwise) more than the Six 
Pounds ^Sterling difference as afforesaid. 

6th. That we will not at any Time, within said Term, by any means, 
either Directly or Indirectly, by our Selves or others for us, Sell within 
the Limmits of New England our Respective Spermaceti Candles for 
Less value than One Shilling and Ten Pence half penny Sterling per 
pound, besides One Shilling Sterling more for Each Box, Each Box to 
Contain a Quarter of a Hundred Weight. 

7th. That no one House in this United Company shall Receive and 
Manufacture any Head Matter either Directly or Indirectly for and 
Upon the Acct of any Other person not Concern'd in this United Com- 
pany, upon any Terms whatsoever. And neither of our Houses Shall add 
to their Company any new partner without the Concent of all the Other 
Houses. 

8th. That we will by one Member at Least from Each Maaufactory 
have Two General Meetings, during Said Term at the best Tavern in 
Taunton, Viz. the first upon the first Tuesday in November, 1762, and 
the other upon the first in March, 1763, or if bad Weather, then the next 
fair day after each sd Days in Order to Consult about Matters for our 
General Interest, And the Expences of this Union and of Said General 
Meetings shall be paid in proportion to the Number of Manufacturys 
thus United, and one member from Each Manufactory at , these General 
Meetings Shall always bring these Articles of Union, so that if any 
Alteration or addition Should be agreed upon the Same may be Annext, 
thereunto and Such Members (meaning Manufactory) as at any Time 
may neglect these General Meetings Shall pay a fine of Eight Dollars, 
(a Reasonable Excuse Excepted) and shall be bound to Conform to What 
may be agreed upon by them who Meet, provided Always that Nothing 
shall be altered or added to these Articles but by the Universal Concent 
of the Members Present. 

9th. That Whereas the Manufacturys now United as affores'd are 
more than Sufficient for Manufacturing all the Head Matter at any Time 
Brought or Likely to be Brought into New England. Therefore each of 
us Shall from time to time use his Utmost Endeavors, by all fair and 
Honorable Means, to prevent the Setting up of any other Spermaceti 
Works, and that Obadiah Brown & Co. together with any Two or more 
of our Houses be Impowered to Call a Special Meeting to be Holden at 
Taunton to which notice we Each Respectively promise to adhere. 

loth. That in Case we find Notwith Standing this Present Union that 
the Price of Head Matter Still Keeps up above Six Pounds Sterling per 
Ton above the price of Such Oil as afforesaid, or In Case Headmatter 
Should now come down to our Difference in Price now agreed upon and 
Should again rise beyound our afforesaid Difference of Six Pounds 
Sterling per Ton above the price of Such Oil as afforesaid, Then in 
either Case we agree to fill out at Least Twelve Vessels upon our Joint 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 169 

Concern to be Imploy'd in the Whalefishery, Each Manufactory in this 
United Company to furnish and receive an Equal Proportion in and from 
Said Vessels: and we also agree to add to the Number of these Vessels 
from time to time as Many more as may then appear most proper. 

nth. That if any One or More Members of Either House in this 
United Company Shall at any time within Said Term, Either directly or 
Indirectly, do or Cause to be done any Act or thing contrary to the plain 
Spirit and Intention of Either of these Articles, and the Same shall be- 
come known (by the Evidence of One Credable Person Under his hand) 
to Either of the Other Members of Either House in the Said United 
Company he Shall upon Such Evidence of Mai Conduct Imediately advise 
the Other Houses of such breach of Articles and the Evidence thereof, 
and thereupon the Said United Company Shall be Immediately Dissolved 
and Each House Shall be at Liberty to Act in the Same Manner as tho' 
these Articles had never been. 

i2th. That Each and Every of these Articles Shall be Understood in 
the Most Simple plain and Obvious meaning of the Words and no One 
Member, Shall Contrary to the Spirit and Intention of these Articles 
Endeavor to make any Advantage of Such In accuracys or want of Ex- 
pression as may have happened thro' Haste or Otherwise. 

In Witness of our full Consent to Each of the Afforesaid Articles and 
Declaring upon our Honor, Reputation and Characters as Men That we 
will Throughout Said Time Act agreeable to the Same, We hereunto 
Subscribe our Names this Fifth Day of November, A. D. 1761. 

Obadiah Brown & co., 
Richard Cranxh & co. 
Naph. Hart & co., 
Isaac Steele & co., 
Thos. Robinson & co., 
Aaron Lopez, 
Collins & Rivera, 
Edward Langdon & son, 
Robert Jenkins jr. " 



Extracts from Letter Book of Samuel Hubbard. 

CONTRIBUTED BY RAY GREENE HULING, NEW BEDFORD, MASS 




{Continued from Vol. 2, 1892, page 65.) 

Letters. 
XXII. 

O the letter of Thomas Olnev, Mr. Hubbard wrote an 
answer, dated June 24, 1670, in the same strain as in 
the letter by his son Clarke and daughter Burdick. 
To the fourth query he replies : 
"My first answer, that was ingraven in Stones was God's 
mind as holy rules forever, being moral law ; as to have no 
God but him only, and yt have the fear of God. Our Lord 
Jesus Christ being questioned which was the great Com- 
mandment, answered it. Mat. 22, 36, 37, 38, 39, verse 40, on 
these two hang all the law and the prophets. Mind I pray 
yo seriously, not disowning of them, but hold them forth as 
the Magna Charta or foundation of all both law and prophets 
hanging thereupon, and I do judge Gospel also, for if no sin 
no need of a Saviour. If then our Lord doth so plainly 
stablish them here and in Mat. 5 and bid His disciples pray, 
their flight should not be on the Sabbath day, or in the 
Winter, holding forth the duration of both. Answer 2, 
That they are moral rules holy David in Psalm III. 7-8 — all 
His commandments are sure, not all, they stand fast forever 
and ever. Answer 3. I conceive Moses's face did not shine 
for wt was written in the tables of stone, for Moses wist not 
that his face did shine, yet had the tables, therefore those 
could not make his face shine, neither that was writ in the 
tables ; for if condemnation was writ in them (as is clear : 2 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 171 

Cor. 3, 7.) then more like to have made his face black, or he 
quaking or trembling ; for law signifieth justice if not per- 
formed by us, or by some other for us. But I conceive con- 
demn' or punishment being due for the breach of them is 
done away for those that do believe, by the blood of our 
dear and precious Redeemer, who hath suffered and fulfilled 
the law in every point for His. Therefore tho' the giving of 
the Holy law of the 10 words was glorious and wonderful, 
with thunderings and the mountain trembling that the peoj^le 
was afraid etc., Exod. 19. 18., how much more glorious is the 
ministration of life to that soul that sees it. That our Son 
of God came himself and took man's nature in all things, sin 
only excepted, and cured diseases and sicknesses and bore all 
our infirmities, cast out devils, cureing souls yea marvellously, 
not only for the Jews but for all nations that believe in Him 
and obey His voice, wch is ye will of His Father also. This 
is the ministration of the Spirit to hold forth repent'ce 
towards God and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. Being 
unvailed, seeing most clearly, it is free grace we are saved 
and not of debt, of faith and not of works. The glory of 
this to an enlightened eye transcends the other for when the 
sun shines clear the moonlight is not seen. The sun is, if 
turned to God and see justification by Jesus Christ only, 
and for all that believe and obey Him is unveiled indeed ; all 
this does not take away God's law of holiness or of the 10 
commands, but for ceremon'e laws and types shadowing a 
Christ to come is done away for the body is Christ. Col. 2. 
17. But I know I write to such as are enlightened and 
[more] knowing the Holy Scriptures than I am. Let us be 
in love embracing one another ; for we ^ee but in part, as the 

cloud is taken away then unveiled, and then we must march 
forward Scionwards in this our howling wilderness. I leave 
you unto God and to the word of His grace — humbly craving 
yr zealous and fervent prayers to God the Father thro Jesus 
Christ b}^ his holy spirit for me poor worthless worm, who is 
yours to use to my power." 

Samuel Hubbard. 
Newport, June 24, 1670. 



172 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

XXIII. 

"Edward Stennett, a poor mourner in Sion for ye abomina- 
tions yt are committed, and waiter for the consolation of 
Israel in the return of the latter day glory, and perfect 
restoring of all the Lord's good old ways, sendeth greeting 
to yt little remnant of the woman's seed that keep the com- 
mand't of God and the faith of Jesus in Rhode Island. 

My very dearly beloved in ye Lord, yr savery lines hath 
been as a refreshing dew from ye Lord to my soul and ye 
souls of others, in beholding the same operation of the Spirit 
of Truth resting upon yo wch thro' great grace hath rested 
upon us, wch I trust will enable ye to bear up, and hold out 
against the same spirit of antichrist and opposition against 
the truth wch we have met wth here to the grief and wound- 
ing of our hearts, for I have seen the spirit of anticht as 
really act in chs as ever I saw it in the parish, since they 
have set themselves agt the Lord's sabbath ; insomuch yt 
without fear or wit they have thrown away all the holy 
scrip's till after ye resurrection of Cht to clear their hands of 
the sabbath, wch roots up all religion at once, for I never met 
with any man of this mind, yt is able to hold redemption by 
Cht, if he will keep true to his principle, yt the whole law 
was abolished by the death of Cht, for they state themselves 
under a new law, and not under yt law that Cht was made , 
under, and suffered the curse of, and so they are not con- 
cerned in Chts fulfilling ye righteousuess of the law in His 
life, or having the curse of it due to transgressors of it in His 
death; but are under a new law wch Cht never was made 
under, nor never suffered the curse of, so yt they are bound 
to fulfil the righteousness of it 'emselves or else lie under the 
curse of it, and so by principle they raise up grace and gospel 
in opposition to God's righteous law. They are run out of 
ye gospel and Cort of grace, and have espoused 'emselves to 
a new cort of works from wch can be no redemption. But 
in this we must say, Father, forgive 'em for they know not 
wht they do. But we may plainly see yt covetousness lies 



I 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 173 

at the bottom of all this opposition ; for those yt will not 
keep the sabbath at God's com't wod all keep it, if man did 
com'd ye keeping of it, as I could make manifest by their 
own principles and practices. 

And my dear friends, as for those yt are drawn back from 
ye sabbath to prophaneness after light, and establishment 
therein, yourselves must not take pleasure in them, but must 
withdraw yourselves from 'em as sinful and disorderly per- 
sons ; and if yr ch'h w411 hold com'n wth those apostates from 
the truth, yo ought then to desire to be fairly dismissed from 
ye ch. well if ye ch'h refuse, yo ought then to withdraw your- 
selves, and not be partakers of other men's sins, but keep 
yourselves pure, but with all humility, meekness andbroken- 
ness of heart. As touching ye ordinance of hands, I have 
sent ye a book yt treats at large upon it, and a book of mine 
that treats of the sabbath." 
Received this 29 July, 1670. 

XXIV. 

Joseph Davis, a prisoner in the castle of Oxford, wrote to 
me Feb. 7, 1669-70 and informed 'em of his having em- 
braced their sentiments about the sabbath for two years. 

Note. Another letter from the same man, dated "Oxen 
Castle, 26th of the 1st month, 1670," which is printed in the 
Seventh Day Baptist Memorial Vol. I. No. 2. (April, 1852), 
shows that he was a prisoner for his religious views. 

XXV. 

The church in Bell lane, London wrote to them Feb. 27, 
1669-70, and speaking of those four called apostates, said: 

"We find that doth greatly add to yr trouble, because 
those yt have done this, were none of the meanest among you 
in helping of you in the work of the Lord." Said ch. went 
on to give these the same advice as Mr. Stennett did, tho' 
after withdraw'g they say, "Be much in love to God and one 
another, building up yourselves in yr most holy faith, pray- 
ing in the Holy Spirit, in suitable frames, love and obedi- 
ence according to wt we receive from him. Therefore, let 



174 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

yv light distinguish yo to have love to all saints, holding up 
com'n with them, as prayer and prophesie, holy conference 
or other good works, unless it be those yo have the particular 
offence against." 

XXVI. 

In answer to Mr. Stennett, they say, "Your good counsel 
we have pondered well, and have taken some steps in, but 
we have no hopes of help from them; but they are encour- 
aging them that are drawn back from ye Lord's holy sabbath 
and he is become a speaker more than ever before. And, 
dear brother, yr desire is to know our standing, (we that is) 
we of the ch'h are very loth to leave all for some ; we being 
very few here, but 5, and weakling, also, beside brother 
Stephen Mumford and his wife. This is the very trouble to 
many of us, and having declared by one for all that we 
cannot have such full freedom of spirit with those yt are 
fallen back from ye truth once professed, most do hold yet 
full communion in breaking of bread, and the rest of the 
ordinance with them. But this by grace we are helped to 
do, we in our measure endeavor to sanctify God's holy day 
by assembling ourselves, seven of us to pray and edify each 
other ; and no man disturbs us in anv kind; blessed be God. 
Oh rich mercy! oh that we might find ye same effect as of 
old! wn the ch's had peace, were edified, and increased. Oh 
dear heart, O that the Lord wouM stir up some to come and 
help us poor ones! At Westerly is brother Joseph Clarke 
Junr. and his wife, sister Ruth Burdick, and sister Maxon. 
Farewell. 

From Newport on William Hiscox, 

Rhode Island, Stephen Mumford, 

4 day Sept. 1670. Samuel Hubbard." 

Note. The five referred to were William Hiscox, Samuel 
Hubbard, Tacy Hubbard, Rachel Langworthy (nee Hubbard) 
and Roger Baster. 

XXVII. 

Mr. Hubbard wrote another letter to Mr. Stennett, wherein 



MAGAZINE OF KEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 175 

be informs him yt he was alone in withdrawing com'n on 
acct of those he called apostates. And as Mr. Stennett was 
a physician he had before proposed to open a trade by 
sending medicens here: in answer to wch Mr. H. informed 
him of his proposing the case to Mr. John (Uarke who was a 
physician, and adds, "I spake also to a friend of mine who by 
God's help saved my life: a man of greatest fame in our 
colony, and most improved one Mr. John Cranston, doctor 
of physik, and captain of the town train band. Dated 12 
of ye 9tb month, 1670. 

Note. The persons here mentioned are, of course, the 
eminent Dr. John Clarke (b. 1609, d. 1676) whose services 
to the infant colony were so invaluable, and his younger 
contemporary Dr. John Cranston, (b. 1626, d. 1680) who 
subsequently became Governor. 

XXVIII. 

Another letter upon the subject says, "Dear father, as 
touching yr desire presented by sister Burdick, wch was for 
our advice as touching a seperation, truly let me tell you, I 
should be glad if I were able to answer your desires: yet 
thus far I am satesfied in my understanding, yt to hold 
com'n wth those apostates is very unsafe, and truly to hold 
com'n with those 3^t strike at the whole law of God, I must 
confess I am not able to maintain: yet I think there might 
be a waiting some time ; but if these lines shall find yo in 
the station you were in when sister left you, and with yt 
intention, two things I earnestly beg of you, first yt yo will 
be very careful in yr seperation yt ye moving cause is only 
and purely in love unto the law of God. In the next plape 
yt yo manage it with all humility, patience and meekness 
and with faithfulness keeping close to the rule of our Lord ; 
and Avhile yo remain among them, as the Lord shall give you 
ability and oppoitunity I beseech you be faithful to bear yr 
testimony for the truths discov'd unto you. 

Thus in haste I shall commit yo unto the Lord and ye 
good word of his grace, wch is able to make tho man of God 



17G MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

wise unto salvation, thoroughly furnished unto every good 
word and work; and I pray present our dutiful respects unto 
father CLarke and our uncles, with our love unto our 
brethren and sisters and cousins. We remain yr dutiful 
children." J. B. C. 

Westerly, 8 August, 1671. 

Note. The writers, "J. B. C," were Joseph and Bethiah 
(Hubbard) Clarke, the son-in-law and daughter of Mr. 
Hubbard. The sister Burdick referred to was Mr. Hub- 
bard's daughter Ruth, the wife of Robert Burdick. The 
Clarkes and Burdick's at this time lived in Westerly. 
"Father Clarke" was Joseph Clarke the elder, who still 
lived at Newport, as did his brothers Thomas and Carew, 
who are the "uncles" mentioned. 

XXIX. 

By a letter from John Crowell to Mr. Mumford, dated 
Twkesbury, 14th, 7 m., 1671, it appears that Mumford was 
originally of that place. 

Note. Stephen Mumford (b. 1639, d. 1707), with his 
wife, Ann, came from London in 1664 (Backus) to Newport. 
He had embraced Seventh Day Baptist views before leaving 
England, and disseminated them on his arrival. Mrs. Hub- 
bard was his first convert beginning the keeping of the 
Seventh day March 10, 1665 (i.e. 1664-5). Mr. Hubbard 
followed April 1, 1665, as did his three daughters and son- 
in-law Clarke within the next year. 

XXX. 

On Sept. 10, 1671, Mesrs. Hiscox, Mumford and Hubbard 
wrote to the ch. in Bell Lane, London, and informed them yt 
they had followed their advice in withdrawing from table 
com'n tho' they still met with the ch'h but did not propose 
to long. 

Note. William Hiscox, (b. 1638, d. 1704) was the 

youngest of the male dissidents. He became the first pastor 

of the church when formed. He was General Treasurer of 

the colony at his death. 

(To be continued.) 



Sketch of the Life of Capt. Wm. Torrey.* 



BY SAMUEL W. EEED. 




ILLIAM TORREY, the subject of this sketch, came 
over from England in 1640 and settled at Wey- 
mouth, being then about 32 years of age. His 
^ ^ former residence was Combe St. Nicholas, in the 
County of Somerset. He was doubtless an educated man, as 
he is spoken of by Edward Johnson in his book called "The 
Wonder Working Providence," published in 1654, as being a 
good penman and skilled in the Latin tongue. He was 
chosen in 1641 a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillei-y Company, or as it was then called the Military 
Compau}^ of Massachusetts. He was made fi'eeman May 18, 
1642, and in September of that year his name appears as one 
of the deputies to the General Court from Weymouth. In 
1643 he was again a de})uty to the General Court and also a 
commissioner for hearing small causes under 20 shillings at 
Weymouth. In vSeptember of this year the stock of powder 
allowed by the General Court to the town of Weymouth was 
placed in his charge, In 1644 and 1645 he was both a deputy 
to the General Court and commissioner for hearing small 
causes at Wejanouth. He was one of the townsmen or 
Selectmen for tlie year 1643-4. In January, 1644, the town 
voted that a foot-path four feet wide should be laid out 
speedily from the lower plantation by William Torrey and 
Nicholas Phillips. In June, 1644, he was chosen by the 
General Court one of a committee to consider the bill pre- 
sented to the house of deputies as to men's proprieties. In 

*Read before the Weymouth, Mass., Historical Society, April 29, 1891. 



178 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

April, 1645, his name appears again as one of the Townsmen. 
In May, 1645,he is mentioned as being a Lieutenant, and was 
appointed to take charge of the military company at Hingham, 
and was to train and exercise the train band there until 
further order of the General Court. He was relieved of this 
duty May 6, 1646, at his own request. In October, 1645, he 
was chosen one of a committee of the General Court to view 
the nearest way between Dorchester and Weymouth and 
report thereon at the next sitting of the Court. 

In November, 1646, he was chosen ''Clarke of the Writs" 
for Weymouth and also one of the commissioners for hearing 
small causes. On May 26, 1647, in answer to the petition 
of the town of Weymouth, he was authorized by the General 
Court to marry in that town such as shall be legally published 
and fit, according to the order of the Court. His name 
appears again among the list of deputies in 1648 and 1649. 
On May 2, 1649, the Court, finding that Lieutenant Torrey 
was employed as dark at the last session of the General 
Court to frame for the house of deputies their bills and 
transcribe fairly the orders of that year in their books, 
allowed him X4 as satisfaction for his paines out of the next 
county levy from the Town of Weymouth. In 1650 he was 
chosen dark of the deputies and also dark of the writs at 
Weymouth. On October 16, 1650, upon his own petition, 
Slate Island in the bay was granted to him in consideration 
that he was to enter the orders of two or three courts not yet 
entered in the deputies' books, This grant was upon the 
condition that the Island had not been expressly granted to 
another and that it was to be free for any man to use the 
slate. In November, 1659, this grant to him was confirmed 
upon the conditions above stated. In 1651 he was chosen 
dark . of the deputies. His name also appears as having 
served in that position in 1652, 1653, 1654, 1655, 1656, 1657, 
1658, 1660, 1661, 1662, 1666 and 1668. In 1654 he was 
chosen recorder for the purpose of recording sales and aliena- 
tions of land in Weymouth. He was also a commissioner 
for hearing small causes. In May, 1655, he was chosen by 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 179 

the General Court a member of a commission, which was to 
act in conjunction with a similar board chosen by the Ply- 
mouth Colony, in laying out a marsh at Conahasset belonging 
to the Massachusetts Colony. In 1657 he was empowered to 
act in all criminal cases in the towns of Hingham, Wey- 
mouth and Nantasket, as any one magistrate may do, and 
was to keep a record of his doings. 

In 1659 he was chosen one of the Selectmen. In October 
of this year he was empowered to "joyne in marriage at Wey- 
mouth such persons as shall desire, the same being published 
according to law." In 1660 he was again one of the Selectmen. 
In May, 1661, he was given "magistratical" power in Wey- 
mouth for the examination and conviction of vagabond 
Quakers, and in proceedings under the laws relating to them 
enacted by the General Court. In December of this year he 
is mentioned as Capt. Torrey, and as his services as dark of 
the deputies were more than usual this year, he was allowed 
£b extra. The salary fixed a number of years before was 
£16 per annum. In 1662, 1664, 1665, 1668 and 1670, his 
name appears as a member of the board of Selectmen. In 
October, 1666, he was allowed additional compensation for 
his services as dark of the deputies so as to make his salary 
for the year £20. In 1672, 1673, 1674, 1678, and 1679 he 
was one of the Selectmen. In 1670 he was a commissioner 
for hearing small causes. In 1672 he was again dark of the 
deputies. 

In 1673 he was given authority to administer oaths in 
Weymouth. In 1675 he was chosen a member of a commit- 
tee of the General Court ff)r the ordering of the granting of 
lots at a place near Mendon, which grant had been made to 
Nathaniel Bosworth and others of Hull. At a special session 
of the General Court called Feb. 4, 1679-80, his name 
appears as a deputy. In June, 1680, he was appointed by 
the General Court a member of a committee to peruse a 
history of New England written by Rev. William Hubbard, 
and report at the next session of the Court, so that the Court 
might oi-der an impression thereof. The report of this com- 



180 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

mittee was undoubtedly favorable, since the treasurer of the 
Colony in October, 1682, was ordered to pay Rev. William 
Hubbard £30 in monev, as a manifestation of their thank- 
fulness for his paines, in compiling a history of the passages 
of God's Providence toward the people of this jurisdiction. 

In Nov., 1682, he was chosen by the town a member of a 
committee to build a new meeting-house, the old one having 
become unfit for use. In March, 1683, he was chosen by the 
town a way warden. This year he was again a deputy to the 
General Court and was granted 500 acres of land for services 
rendered to the Colony. On Nov. 26, 1683, he was chosen 
moderator at a town meeting held on that date. He appears 
as one of the defendants in a writ of quo warranto issued 
against the Governor and Company of Massachusetts Bay by 
the Court of Queen's Bench, Westminster, June 27, 1683, 
being then dark of the deputies. The result of these legal 
proceedings was that the charter of the colony was revoked. 

In 1684 William Torrey was again dark of the deputies. 
In 1686, the charter of the colony having been revoked, Sir 
Edmund Andros was appointed Governor. All meetings of 
the people except for the choice of town officers were pro- 
hibited. This state of affairs continued until the spring of 
1689. When the rumor reached Boston in April, 1689, that 
there was a revolution in England and the Prince of Orange 
was about to be made king, the people seized and imprisoned 
Andros and re-established their charter government with 
Simon Bradstreet at its head. At the first meeting of the 
Council for the safety of the people and convention of the 
peace in May, 1689, to which deputies were chosen, Capt. 
William Torrey and Ephraim Hunt appear as deputies from 
Weymouth. In 1687 Capt. Torrey wrote a book entitled "A 
Discourse upon Futurity or Things to Come." The book 
shows that the author was well 'acquainted with the Holy 
Scriptures. The language is plain and simple and shows the 
humble and reverent spirit of the writer, Capt. Torrey. He 
died June 10, 1690, leaving a widow and eight children of 
whom the most prominent was Rev. Samuel Torrey, a dis- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 181 

tinguished clergyman at that time. The house in which 
Capt. Torrey lived was situated near what is now known as 
Sampson's Cove, about two hundred feet east of Neck street, 
and nearly opposite the estate of the late Gideon Sampson. 
The following affidavits taken from the Registry of Suffolk 
Deeds fix the time of his arrival in this country: 

''Philip Torrey,aged 59 years or thereabouts, heretofore of 
Combe St. Nicholas in the County of Somerset, within the 
realm of England,there Living until the yeare 1640 (yeoman), 
in that year removing to New England with Wm. Torrey & 
Samuel his son, both of the sd Combe St. Nicholas with 
whom he lived for Severall years, and beeing arrived in New 
England settled and hath ever since lived in Roxbury in the 
County of Suffolk in N. E., aforesaid, on his corporal oath 
deposed that hee well knew and was acquainted with the sd 
William Torrey the father, and Samuel Torre}" his son all the 
while hee lived in Combe St. Nicholas affors'd in old England, 
& ever since he came to N. E., & to this day being in their 
company, on his oath affirms them to be the same Wm. Torrey 
& Samuel Torrey, father and soun afores'd, having severall 
opportunities in each year to see and confer with them ever 
since, thev beeing both in good health this day, beeing the 
fifth day of March 1673-4. 

Taken upon oath before us, 

Richard Russell, 
Thomas Dan forth." 

"George Fry aged 58 years, or thereabouts, heretofore of 
Combe St. Nicholas, in the Realm of England, husband-man, 
living there until the year 1640, in that yeai- removed and 
came in the same shipp to N. E. with Wm. Torrey and Sam'l 
Torrey his son, both of the sd Combe St Nicholas, and being 
arrived in N. E. settled and ever since have lived in Wev- 
mouth in the County of Suffolk, in N. E. afore'sd, on his cor- 
poral oath deposed, that in old England for severall years until 
the yeare above sd, he was well acquainted with and knew 
Wm. Torrey the Father and Samuel Toi-rey his soun and 
ever since until the day of tlie date hereof, they and hee this 
deponent haveing lived in one town viz. in Weymouth in N. 
E. aforesd, and beeing with tliem in Boston in N .E. they are 
both in good health this day,being the fifth of March 1673-4. 

Taken upon oath in Boston March 5 1673-4, by George 
Fry before us, 

Richard Russell, 
Thomas Danforth." 



Extracts from the Friends Records, Portsmouth 

R.L 



ALMY. 




HE early records of this family found on the register 
kept by the Friends Society begin with the births of 
the children of Job and Mary, of Warwick, R. I. 
Job was son of William and Audry Almy of Lynn 
and Sandwich, Mass., William was born 1601, died 1676. 
His wife, whose maiden name is unknown, was born 1603 
and died about 1676. In 1642 he sold land in Sandwich, 
and two years later, Nov. 14, 1644, he was of Portsmouth, R. 
I., where he was made a freeman in 1655. Job was in Ply- 
mouth Colony in 1660, and in 1670-72 was a Deputy from 
Warwick, R. I. His wife was Mary Unthank, dau. of Christo- 
pher and Susanna. Job died 1684, his wife married 2d, Tho- 
mas Townsend, and died 1724. 

Marriages. 

Rebecca, of William, Tiverton, to Holder Slocum, of 
Peleg, Dartmouth, April 11,1734. 

Elizabeth, of Job and Alice, Portsmouth, to John How- 
land, of James and Elizabeth, Dartmouth, September, 1773. 

Job, of Job and Alice, to Sarah Lawton, of Isaac and 
Mary, Portsmouth, September 6, 1775. 

Isaac, of Job and Catharine, to Susanna Lawton, of Isaac 
and Mary, Portsmouth, Nov. 4, 1789. 

Peleg, of Job and Catharine, to Susannah Sherman, of 
Sampson and Ruth, Sept. 14, 1793. 

Catharine, of Isaac and Susannah, to Benjamin Anthony, 
of Abraham and Lettishe, Portsmouth^ May 1, 1812. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 183 

Ruth, of Peleg and Susannah, Portsmouth, to Daniel 
Cobb, of William and Lydia, Gorham, March 20, 1816. 

Phebe, of Holder and Sarah, Portsmouth, to Ebenezer 
Metcalf, of Ebenezer and Asenath, Cumberland, R. I., June 
10, 1818. 

Elizabeth, of Isaac and Rebecca, to Jacob Chase, of Shadrac 
and Rebecca, Portsmouth, Oct. 2, 1833. 

Births. 

William I ^^ j^^ ^^^^ ^j Warwick, Feb. 20, 16634 

Christopher ] -^^ 

William " '' " Sept. 5, 1605 

Susannah " '' '' July 29, 1666-7 

Audrey '' " '' April 5, 1669 

Deborah " " '' Aug. 5, 1671 

Katharine '' " " Jan. 22, 1673-4 

Sarah, wife of Holder, June 26, 1652 

Elizabetli, of Holder and Sarah, Portsmouth, Jan. 18, 1769 

Christopher " '' " June 17, 1771 

Mary '• " " Jan. 24, 1773 

Isaac " " '• March 3, 1777 

Rebecca " '' " June 2, 1779 

Jacob " '' " Feb. 24, 1782 

Holder, of Job Jr. and Sarah, Portsmouth, Aug. 26, 1777 

Samuel, " " " March 19, 1780 

Alice " '' " Nov. 8, 1781 

Elizabeth " " '' May 16, 1784 

Andrew " *' Newport, Sept. 21, 1787 

Catharine, of Isaac and Susannah, Portsmouth, Oct. 17, 1790 

Nancy " " '^ Oct. 3, 1793 

Ruth, of Peleg and Susannah, Portsmouth, June 7, 1794 

Sampson " " '^ Sept. 15, 1795 

Lydia, wife of Christopher, July 31, 1769 

Joseph, of Christopher and Ljalia, Newport, June 30, 1795 

Mary Lawton " " " Oct. 30, 1796 

Jacob " " " July 17, 1800 

Robert Lawton " " " Feb. 6, 1802 

Lydia '^ " '^ Nov. 23, 1803 



184 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Obadiah, of Christdplier and Lydia, Newport, June 8, 1805 

Sarah " " " April 26, 1807 

Rhoda *' *' •» June 15, 1810 

Samuel Holder " " *' April 13, 1812 

Phebe '^ '' " Oct. 21, 1815 

James, of Isaac and Hannah, Portsmouth, Oct. 18, 1801 

William " " " Aug. 18, 1803 

Edward " " " May 8, 1805 

Susannah •' " " May 10, 1807 

Elizabeth '^ " " Feb. 21, 1813 

Deatl^s. 

Christopher, of Job and Mary, Warwick, May 10, 1663. 

William, of Job and Mary, age H years, Jan. 3, 1665-6. 

Anstis, wife of Job, and dan. of Isaac Lawton, Newport, 
Feb. 11, 1739. 

Peleg, Portsmouth, age 35 years, Sept. 18, 1797. 

Jacob, of Christopher and Lydia, Newport, age 15 months, 
Oct. 24, 1801. 

Elizabeth, of Holder and Sarah, Portsmouth, age 41 years, 
7 months, March 12, 1811. 

Isaac, of Holder and Sarah, Portsmouth, age 40 years, 1 
month, 28 days. May 2, 1817. 

Mary Lawton, of Christopher and Lydia, Gloucester, age 
36 years, 9 months, March 2, 1817. 

James, of Isaac and Hannah, Portsmouth, age 7 months, 
Jan. 28, 1802. 

Sarah, widow of Job, Newport, dau. of Isaac and Mary 
Lawton, Portsmouth, ''at her son-in-law's. Dr. Richardson," 
age 66 years, 6 months, 7 days, Oct. 14, 1820. 

Alice, of Job and Catharine, Portsmouth, Oct. 29, 1831. 

Rebecca, of Job and Catharine, Portsmouth, Jan. 24, 1833. 

Isaac, of Job and Catharine, Portsmouth, age 70 years, 
Jan. 11, 1835. 

Rhoda, Portsmouth, age 69 years, Feb. 6, 1851. 

Nancy, of Isaac and Susanna, at Jacob Chase's, Berkeley, 
Mass., age 64 years, 3 months, 14 days, July 17, 1817. 

Hannah, widow of Isaac, Portsmouth, age 92 years, Nov. 
21, 1869. 



James Skiff, of Sandwich, Mass., and some of 

His Descendants. 



BY O. P. ALLEN, PALMER, MASS. 




> AMES SKIFF came from England to Lynn, Mass., as 
early as 1635, he removed to Sandwich soon after, as 
we find that he had a grant of ten acres of land there 
Jan. 14, 1GG6, where he was one of the earliest set- 
tlers. He was one of the leading men in Sandwich, and was 
admitted a freeman in 1644. He was selectman, excise man. 
Constable, Deputy to the General Court for many years, also 
a member of the Governor's Council. He seems to have 
been a man who had broader views than many of his con- 
temporaries, as we find on the old records that he was several 
times reproved because he was lenient and merciful to the per- 
secuted Quakers. From all accounts we have of him, he 
deserved well of his town, as well as of the Colony. I have 
failed to ascertain the date of his death, but as he was one of 
the selectmen as late as 1674 he must have lived to an ad- 
vanced age. His wife Mary died Sept. 21, 1673. Their 
children were: 

I. James^ b. Sept, 12, 1638,' m. Elizabeth Cooper of 
Boston. He removed to Martha's Vineyard in 
1670. 

11. Stephen^ b. April 14, 1641, m. Lydia who 

died his widow, March 17, 1713. Their child- 
ren were Abigail b. Mar. 2, 1666, Deborah b. 
July 14, 1668, Mary b. Nov. 13, 1671, Stephen 
b. Feb. 4, 1685. Like his father, Stephen was 
a man of affairs, was Selectmen, Town Agent, 



186 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Deputy to the General Court, and on the 
Governor's Council. 

III. NathanieP b. Mar. 20, 1645. 

IV. Sarah^b.Oct. 12, 1646. 

V. Bathsheba^ b. April 20, 1648, m. 1666, Shea- 
jashub Bourne. 
VI. Marj2 b. Mar. 25, 1650. 
VII. Patience^b. Mar. 25, 1652, m. Oct. 26, 1675, 

Elisha Bourne. 
VIII. Benjamin^ b. Nov. 15, 1655. 
IX. Nathan^ b. May 16, 1658. 

Nathan^ Skiff (James\} born in Sandwich, May 16, 

3658, m. (1) Hephzibah , who died before 1698. He m. 

(2) Dec. 13, 1699, Mercy Chipman, dau. of John and Hope, 
of Barnstable. She was granddaughter of John Howland and 
of John Tilley of the Mayflower, and was born Feb. 6, 1668. 
Have no record of the death of Nathan Skiff and his 2d 
wife. He removed to Chilmarte, M. V., where the record of 
his children is found. Children by the first marriage: 
I. James^b. Mar. 10, 1689. 
II. Elizabeth^ b. Sept. , 1690. 

III. Benjamin^ b. April 29, 1691. 

IV. Slyshon^ b. May 26, 1693. 
V. Mary3 b. May 26, 1695. 

Children by second marriage. 

. VI. MacyS b. July 5, 1701. 

VII. SamueP b. Dec. 24, 1703. 

VIII. Johns b. Aug. 22, . 

IX. Joseph^ b. Nov. 18, 1709. 

Macy^ Skiff (Nathan^ James\) b. at Chilmarth, M. V., 
July 5, 1701, m. (1) 1722, Prince Coffin^, (Menezer\ James^ 
Tristram^ Peter^.) He d. Dec. 10, 1729. Their children 
were: 

I. Prince^ d. Feb. 4, 1781. 
II. Hannah* b. Oct. 15, 1728, m. John Wilcox, son 
of Stephen and Judith. She d. Oct. 2, 1814. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 187 

III. Mray4 b. Feb. 28, 1729, m. Tristram Folger, son 
of Jethro aifd May. She d. Sept. 4, 1776. 
The widow Mercy (iSkiff,) Coffin m. (2) May 2, 1732, 
Nathaniel Allen {Edivard^^ Edward?^ IIope\') of Nantucket. 
Nathaniel was the great, great grandfather of the writer. 
The authorities for the above are Plymouth Colony Records, 
Freeman's History of Cape Cod, Town Records of Chilmark 
and Nantucket, and the Rowland Genealogy. 

Query. — What was the date of the death of the elder 
James Skiff, of Sandwich? Also the dates of the death of 
Nathan Skiff and his wife Mercy? Did the}^ spend their 
closing years on the Vineyard? There was a Nathan Skiff 
who was a witness to a deed in Coventry, Conn., in 1739, was 
he the Nathan of the Vineyard? If any one has additional 
facts connected with the above family they will be thankfully 
received. 



Portrait of One of the Old School Gentlemen of a 
Century Ago. — Sir Jonah Barrington says : "Dress has a 
moral effect on mankind. Let an}^ gentleman find himself 
with dirty boots, old surtout, soiled neckcloth and a general 
negligence of dress, he will in all probability find a corre- 
sponding disposition, by negligence of address. We should 
perhaps feel the force of this could we but see one of the 
'solid men of Boston' of olden times, as he came down State 
street at the hour of high change, then twelve o'clock. His 
appearance would cause as much or more excitement than 
that of the Turkish Ambassador, who recently made us a 
visit. Col. Jacob Wendell, merchant, who died in 1761, is 
thus described: 'His dress was rich, being a scarlet embroi- 
dered coat, gold-band cocked hat, embroidered long waist- 
coat, small clothes, with gold knee buckles, silk stockings 
with gold clocks, shoes and large gold or silver buckles, as 
the importance of the occasion or business demanded, full 
ruffles at the bosom and wrists, and walking with a gold- 
headed cane.' " 



Notes. 

PiERCE-MouLTON. Clothier Pierce of Swanzey, Mass., son 

of John and grandson of the celebrated Captain Michael 

Pierce of King Philip's War, was b. May 5, 1698, and m. Nov. 

19,1718, Hannah Sherman, daughter of Eber and Honora 

Sherman. She was b. June 23, 1700. Their children were: 

I. Clothier b. Feb. 24, 1720. 

II. Hannah b. Feb. 16, 1722. 

III. Elizabeth b. Oct. 23. 1724. 

IV. Freelove b. July 4, 1727. 

In the eommon burying ground at Newport, R. L, is the 
grave stone of Mary Pierce, wife of Clothier Pierce who d. 
Nov. 27, 1768, at 70 years, 2 months, 22 days. She was 
probably a second wife. The eldest daughter, Hannah, was 
married in Newport, Oct. 4, 1747, to Michael Moulton and 
the Newport Records contain the marriage, October 28, 1740, 
of a John Moulton to Elizabeth Pierce, who may or may not 
have been the second daughter of Clothier Pierce, as John 
Moulton may or may not have been a brother of Michael. 
Michael Moulton was a sea captain and his name was en- 
rolled in the Fellowship Club of Newport, Dec. 5, 1752. He 
was one of its charter members. He d. Jan. 30, 176S, in 
Jamaica. The children of Michael and Hannah {Pierce) 
Moulton were: 

I. John b. April 28, 1748, d. in St. Martins, Oct. 

23 1762. 
II. Elizabeth, k Nov. 29, 1749, m. Nov. 12, 1768, 
Jeremiah Fones Greene, and died within a year 
or so, as on July 18, 1771, he m. (2) Rebecca 
Marshall. 

III. Michael b. March 17, 1757. 

IV. William b. July 2, 1760, d. May 9, 1761. 
V. John Cooper b. June 21, 1762. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 189 

Michael Moulton, son of Michael, followed the sea and 
during the War of the Revolution did splendid service for 
his country in its armed vessels. In January 1778, he was a 
Lieutenant on the Sloop Providence, Capt. John Peck 
Rathbone, and assisted in taking Fort Nassau, New Provi- 
dence. With but two men he captured a second fort four 
miles from Fort Nassau, and after spiking the guns in it, 
made a successful retreat to Fort Nassau. He was b. March 
17, 1757, and d. Dec. 18, 1820, at which time he was a Revo- 
lutionary Pensioner. He m. 1777, Dorothy Brown, daughter 
of Esek Jr. and Rachel {Cole) Brown, of Swanzey. She was 
b. 1759 and d. Aug. 20, 1837. Children: 

I. John, b. Swanzey, June 7, 1778. 
II. William, b. Swanzey, June 14, 1780, d. June 10, 
1856, m. Mary Henshaw of John. She was b. 
1782, and d. Sept. 26, 1833. 

III. Elizabeth, b. Providence, July 19, 1782, d. Nov. 

3, 1807, m. Oliver Vars. 

IV. Rachel, b. Newport, Sept. 7, 1785, m. William 

Friend. 
V. Michael, b. Newport, April 3, 1788. 
VI. Clothier Pierce, b. Newport, Nov. 6, 1790. 
VII. Hannah, b. Newport, Oct. 27, 1793, m. Thomas 

Stevens. 
VIII. Sarah, b. Newport, Aug. 13, 1796, d. Jan. 15, 
1861, m. March 18, 1821, James Perry Jr., who 
was b. Sept. 20, 1795, and d. April 18, 1860. 

IX. Clarissa, b. Newport, May 11, 1800, m. 

Johnnot. 
The writer would be glad to obtain the ancestry in his 
own name of the first Michael Moulton. He is believed to 
be a descendant of John and Elizabeth ( Corey) Moulton of 
Salem, Mass. Information relative to the Moulton and 
Corey families, and their connection with Clothier Pierce, if 
any, respectfully solicited. 

Washington, D. C, Gen. T. L. Casey. 



190 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Knapp Family. — In 1630 there left Old England for New 
England a large colony of well to do farmers under com- 
mand of Winthrop and Salstansall, and among them were 
William and Nicholas Knapp. Tradition says, three brothers 
came to this country in early days, one a bachelor, who re- 
turned to England. William Knapp was probably born at 
Buoy St, Mary's, Suffolk Co. England, about 1578, and emi- 
grated to America 1630; settled at Watertown, Mass. His 
children were William, Mary, Elizabeth, Ann, Judith, John 
and James: they and their children settled at Newton, 
Roxbury, Boston, Spencer, Salem and Newburyport, Mass. 
He was a widow^er when he came, but married for his second 
wife Priscella Akers. 

Nicholas Knapp was born in England, and emigrated to 
America 1630; settled at Watertown, Mass., where he lived 
till 1648, when he moved to Stamford, Conn. His first wife 
was Eleanor, whom he probably married in England; she died 
June 16, 1658. His second wife was Unica, widow of Peter 
Brown, of Stamford, Conn., whom he m. 9 January, 1659; 
he died at Stamford, April 16, 1670. Their children were: 
I. Jonathan^ born and died 1631. 
II. Timothy2 b. 24 Dec, 1632, settled at Rye, N. Y. 

III. Joshua^ b. 5 June, 1635, settled at Greenwich, Ct. 

IV. Caleb2 b. 20 Jan., 1637, settled at Stamford, Ct. 
V. Sarah^ b. 5 Jan., 1639, m. John Disbrow. 

VI. Ruth^ b. 6 Jan., 1641, m. Joseph Ferris. 
VII. Hannah^ b. 5 March, 1642. 
VIII. Moses2 b. 1655, settled at Peekskill, N. Y. 

IX. Lydia^ b. , m. Thomas Pennoyer. 

Of Caleb's^ children, 

I. Caleb^ settled at Norwalk, Conn. 
II. Moses^ settled at New Fairfield, Conn. 
III. SamueF settled at Danbury, Conn. 
About the same time there were two other families of 
Knapps in the country. So far I have not discovered any 
relation between them. Roger Knapp was at New Haven, 
Conn., 1643-7, Fairfield, 1656-75. He probably came in 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 191 

the Plymouth Colony about 1640; by his will he mentions 
wife Elizabeth, and children Jonathan, Josiah, Lydia, Roger, 
John, Nathaniel, Eliza and Mary; the}^ settled at Bridgeport, 
Weston and Redding. 

Aaron Knapp was at Taunton, Mass., 1639, probably 
arrived about that time with the Plymouth Colony which 
settled Taunton, and it is said named the place from their 
home in England. His will, which is recorded at Plymouth 
and proved 2 Nov., 1674, mentions wife Elizabeth, children 
Aaron, John, Samuel, Moses, Joseph, Mary and Elizabeth ; 
his descendants settled Norton, Mansfield, Rehoboth and 
Raynham. 

In this century Knapp was spelled with a single p, and 
some still hold it to this day. 

I propose to compile a genealogy of this family and will 
be pleased to correspond with all interested. 

Interlachen^ Florida^ Charles R. Knapp. 

Markham Family. — An effort is being made to compile 
a record of the Markham family. Most of this name 
descend from Deacon Daniel, who came from England about 
1665, whose name was variously written: Markum, Marcum, 
and Marcam. In addition to Daniel's family, records of the 
following have been collected, viz : William, of Middletown, 
1650, complete; Nathaniel, of Watertown, 1673; Jeremiah, 
of Dover, 1659; Gov. William, of Pennsylvania, 1681; John 
of New York and Virginia, 1720; and of Mr. Markham, of 
Virginia, 1635. E. A. Markham, Box 95, Durham, Conn., 
will be pleased to correspond with all interested. 

Cone Family of Connecticut. — Daniel Hurlburt 
Cone, son of Daniel and Susannah {Hurlburt) Cone, born in 
Middletown, Conn., April 6th, 1753, married Elizabeth 
Adkins, dau. of James and Rebecca (Storrs) Adkins, Aug. 
18th, 1776. She was born in Middletown, Conn., Oct. 16th 
1755, and died in Winchester, Conn., Feb. 27th, 1829, aged 
73 years, 4 months and 11 days. He died in Winchester, 
April 17th, 1841, aged 88 years and 11 days. By occupation 



192 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

lie was a shoemaker. During the Revolutionary war he 
served three enlistments, enlisting first in the 4th, Company, 
2nd, Continental Troops from Conn., under Col. Joseph 
Spencer, from May 10th, 1775 to Dec. 19th, 1775. The 
second enlistment was from June 5th to Dec. 25th, 1776, 
under Col. Comfort Sage. He afterwards served in an Ar- 
tillery company to near the close of the war, and in 1818 was 
granted a pension for his services. Their children (all born 
in Winchester,) were: 

I. Susannah, b. June 22nd, 1781, m. James Bragg, 

and d. Winchester, Feb. 11th, 1816. 

II. Daniel, b. Oct. 14th, 1782, m. Belinda White and 

d. Norfolk, Conn., 1821. 

III. Elizabeth,29th, b. Jan. 1784, m. Leonard Hurlburt 

d. Winchester, Jan. 6th 1839. 

IV. Samuel, b. Oct. 18th, 1785, m. Clarissa Hunger, 

and d. Norfolk, May 4th, 1836. 
V. Hurlburt, b. Jan. 5th, 1788, m. Marianna Fair- 
child, d. Newton, Conn., . 

VI. Warren, b. Aug. 19th, 1789, m. Laura Jones and 
d. Norfolk, May 8th, 1852. 
VII. Sullivan, b. ,1793, m. Lucretia Hum- 
phrey, d. Westfield, N. Y.. July 31st, 1833. 
VIll. Silas, b. Jan. 27th, 1795, m. Sarah Hayes and d. 
West Granby, May 12th, 1863. 
An effort is being made to collect and publish the records 
of the descendants of Daniel Cone, 1626-1706, the pioneer 
Cone of America. The undersigned will be pleased to cor- 
respond with all interested. 

1405 Polk St.^ Topeka^ Kansas, William W. Cone. 
Diary of a Trip from Portsmouth to Albany with 
Munitions of War, in 1776. — I am glad to give a copy ad 
literatim of my grandfather's diary, kept by him, Joshua 
Berry, in his Journey from Portsmouth, N. H. to Albany, N. 
Y.; appointed by Genl. Stark. He was born in Greenland, 
N. H. Sept. 27, 1755, son of Thomas, was 21 years of age 
when thus appointed captain of a company of young men to 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 193 

carry munitions of war. The money he received for this 
enterprise he laid out in wild land in Pittsfield, N. H., then a 
part of Chichester, where he became a successful farmer and 
miller, and died on the day he was 71. 

Boston, Mass. Nehemiah Chase Berry. 

(^OPY OF DIARY. 

"The Road From Portsmouth to Albany. 

Started from Portsmouth, November 21 da}^ 1776, with ten ox teams. 
Each team carried three and twenty hundred weight. 

Portsmouth. Brookfields, Cap. Rices, Smiles. 

Greenland. Wester. 

Strathum, (put up at) Pipers, 9 miles. Palmer, Blisses, 11 miles. 

Kinstown, Stephens, 14 miles. Wilbraham. 

Plasto. Springfield, Willingstones, 20 miles. 

Havril Pherry, 10 miles. West Springfield, Elies, 2 miles. 

Bradford, Kimbles, 2 miles. Westfield, Mr. Kings, 

Andover, Fosters, 9 miles. Gasso, Cap. Greys, 

Tuksberry. B omford, Moss, 

Belricker. Louden Woods, 

Bedford, Cap. Mors, 15 miles. Tyringham, Brewers, 

Sutberry, Rices, 12 miles. Great Barrington, Lords, 

3t<>w. Agramount. 

Marlberry, Brighams, 10 miles. Nobletown, Coates, 

Northberry. Spencer. 

Shoesberry. Canterhook, Unbust'ers, 

Worster, Starkses, 15 miles. Greenbush, Storks, 

Lester. Albany Pherry, 

Spencer, Ginks, 12 mil s. 

We rested the twenty first day and the twenty sixth day we saw 
Albany Pherry. We returned home, laid by two days, and got back in 
eighteen days. 

Signed: JOSHUA BERRY." 

Land Sold for the use of the Pequot Indians, 1683. — 
We desire to make a few corrections in the article in the 
April number of the Magazine of New England Histor}^ 
"Land sold in Stonington, Conn., for the use of the Pequot 
Indians, in 1683," viz: The word Stonington in the 10th line 
on page 129 shoukl read Southerton. The name of the Indian 
Chief, Mornoho, should be Momoho wherever it occurs. The 
name of the son of Harmon was Oatapeset, not Catepunt. 
The name of the Pequot soldier, Robert Stenford should be 
Robert Stanford. The Court mentioned, at the close of the 
article, should read Superior Court. — [Ed. 



7 


miles. 


8 


miles. 


7 


miles. 


4 


miles. 


II 


miles. 


6 


miles. 


i6 


miles. 


i6 


miles. 


14 


miles. 


12 


miles. 



Queries. 



21. Carr. — Mary Carr, who is buried next to her hus- 
band, William Gardner, and near Daniel Carr, in the com- 
mon ground, so called, at Newport R. I., was born in 1716, 
married about 1734, by Rev. Nicholas Eyres. She died in 
1787. Was she the daughter of Daniel Carr, who was born 
1687 and died 1738? He was the son of Caleb and grandson 
of Gov. Caleb Carr of Newport, R. I. Her marriage is re- 
corded in the copied town records (p. 236). Her children were: 
John, Caleb, Daniel, Joseph, William, Mary Clarke, Frances 
Taber, Catharine Burroughs, and Hannah. 

Dostey^ Md. Wm. Fowler Gardner. 

22. Cone. — Mr. W. W. Cone, of Topeka, Kansas, who is 
collecting material for a Cone Genealogy will gladly ex- 
change data. The names of the parents of the following 
persons are especially desired, viz.: 

Icabod Cone, b. 1757, m. Anna Holmes, of Saybrook, Conn., 
and d. 1831. 

Robert Cone, b. 1758, m. Sarah Cook, of Wilmington, Vt., 
and d. Colerain, Mass. 

Jesse Cone. b. about 1760. Had Edward and Mahi table 
and d. 1824. 

Henry Cone, b. 1745, m. Waits tilt Champion and d. 1827. 

Giles Cone, d. 1776. Had Anderson, b. Dec. 12, 1776. 

Joseph Cone, b. Nov. 26, 1779, d. 1861. 

Simon Cone, b. 1747, m. Hannah Clark and d.^Colchester, 
Ct., 1824. 

Silas, b. about 1790, m. Sarah Tyron,in Haddam,Ct.,'1835. 

Abner, an early settler of Wells, Vt., had Abner, Enoch, 
Noah, John and Joseph. The above were born in Connecticut. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 195 

Thomas Cone, m. Lois Watson, in Williamstown, Mass., 
1799. 

Riley, b. about 1800, m. Catlierine Smith, d. 1875. 

Calvin, b. about 1750, m. Miss Leete. 

Lemuel, b. 1770, m. Polly Parker, of Charlestown, N. H. 

23. Seabury. — Ichabod Seabury of Little Compton, R. 
I., born Jan. 18, 1734, died at Harwich (now Brewster) Cape 
Cod, Oct. 30, 1788, married in 1756, Temperance Gibbs of 
Little Compton. ? 

Information is desired of her parentage and ancestry, by 
one of her descendants. 

109 Summit Ave., St. Paul. Mirin. C. E. Mayo. 

24. Mayo. — Thomas Mayo, of Harwich, Cape Cod, was 
captured from a privateer in the Revolutionary war, was a 
prisoner on the "Jersey" at Wallabout Bay, was discharged 
sick, and died on his journey home at Newport, R. I., in 1778. 

Is there any record of his death and burial? 
109 Summit Ave., St. Paul, Minn. C. E. Mayo. 

25. Family of Gen. Greene. — I wish to obtain the 
names of General Nathaniel Greene's brothers and sisters, 
and whom they married. He was born at or near Warwick, 
R. L, in 1742. 

Springivater, N. Y. D. Byron Waite. 

26. Mumford. — Information wanted relative to the an- 
cestors of Stephen Mumford (b. 1639, died 1707), who came 
from London, England, 1664 and settled in Newport, R. I. 
He was one of the founders of the Seventh Day Baptist 

Church, in 1671 at Newport. His wife, Ann , was 

born 1635, and died 1698. I also desire information relative 
to the ancestors of Benjamin Mumford, of Newport, R. I., 
who died, 1773. His wife was Ann, daughter of John and 
Peace (Perry) Mumford, born 1701, and granddaughter of 
the Stephen Mumford first named. I can find no relationship 
between Benjamin and Stephen. I shall be glad to correspond 
with any person having Mumford Records. 

313 Chestnut Street, Phil, Penn. J. P. MuMFORD. 



196 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

27. The Compact of the Pilgrims. — What became of 
the original compact signed by some forty two of the Pilgrims 
on board the Mayflower? Of the forty-two signers, only some 
twenty-four are known by their autographs, so far as I know. 

Warren, R. 1. Theodore Warren. 

28. Mayo. — I am in search of the name of my great- 
grandfather, who married Anna Winchester, in or about 
Norwich, Conn., about 1790; to this marriage was born a son 
William, on Sept. 17, 1799, at Norwich, who was my grand- 
father; also were born two daughters, names not known to me, 
one of the daughters married a man by the name of Carpen- 
ter, who then went to New York City. William's father died 
when he was young, and his mother, Anna Mayo, married 
again soon. William left home at about twelve years of age. 

Any fact, data or clue that will lead to finding the name I 
desire will be much appreciated, and rewarded as far as pos- 
sible. Correspondence solicited. 

Lake Charles, La. A. M. Mayo. 

29. Smith. — Rev. Peter Smith was settled as minister of 
the gospel, in East Kingston, N. H., soon after the town was 
incorporated (1788), and remained until 1772. Of what 
family was he? Information relative to him will be of interest 
to many. 

Boston, Mass, ^ J. H. C. 

30. Adams. — Lt, Col. Winborn Adams was killed in the 
battle of Behmus's Heights, Sept. 19, 1777. His widow, 
Sarah Adams, petitioned the Assembly of New Hampshire 
for half pay, which was allowed for seven years from his 
death. In a petition dated 1782 she calls herself of Exeter. 
What was her maiden name, and of what family was her 
husband? 

Boston, Mass. J. .H .C 

31. Rootes-Gale. — Jonathan Rootes, son of Josiah, of 
Beverly, Mass., was born about 1666. In 1687 he was in 
possession of much property as in that year he gave deeds of 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 197 

certain lands. In some of those documents he is spoken of 
as a "fisherman of Marblehead," at other times as "of Bever- 
ly." In 1694, "Jonathan Rootes and his wife were dismissed 
from the Salem church to the church about gathering in 
Middleboro, or if the brethren object, to the church at Ply- 
mouth." It does not appear from the records of these 
churches that he went to either place or joined either church. 
This was shortly after his mother, Mrs. Susannah Rootes, 
had been imprisoned and shackled for witchcraft, and it may 
be supposed that he did not entertain any too good an opinion 
of the people of Salem. He probably married Abigail Gale, 
of Marblehead. He died before 1729, as she was received 
into full communion in the Marblehead church, February 2, 
1729, and recorded as the wife of a Mr. Deveraux. Can any 
of the readers of this Magazine give any further inforn^ation 
relating to Jonathan Rootes. When did he die? Did he 
leave any descendants? R. 

32. Chapman. — Ralph Chapman, son of Ralph and Lj^dia 
(Wills} Chapman, of Marshfield, Mass., born about 1655, 

married first Mary , she died, Newport, R. I., March 

22, 1688. His second wife was Abigail , who died 

Newport, R. I., in 1694. His third wife was Mary, daughter 
of Gov. Walter Clarke, of R. I. What were the maiden 

names of his first and second wives? 

Chapman. 

38. Delano. — Where can I obtain some information of 
the family of Lt. Jonathan Delano, of Dartmouth, Mass? He 
was born 1648, died Dec. 23, 1720. His wife was Mary, 
daughter of Nathaniel and Sarah ( Walker) Warren, to whom 
he was married, Feb. 1678. She was born in 1658. A record 
of their children is wanted. T. 

34. Paige. — Who were the ancestors of Timothy Paige, 
who was a representative to the General Court of Massachu- 
setts for mau}^ years in the latter part of the 18th century? 
He was also a member of the Constitutional Convention of 

Massachusetts in 1820. Where did he reside? 

St. Louis^ Mo. J. T. P. 



198 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

35. Tubbs-Laurence. — Whose daughter was Anne 
Laurence, whose marnage to Thomas Tubbs, November 9, 
1780, is found on the records of Canaan, Conn.? L. 

36. Richardson.— Ezra Richardson, of East Medway, 
Mass., married Jemima Lovell. They had a son Joseph 
Lovell, who was born March 29, 1789. What are the dates 
of birth, death and marriage of Ezra Richardson and his wife 
Jemima? B. S. 

37. Clarke-Wanton.— Who were the ancestors of John 

and Elizabeth ( ) Clarke, of Newport, R. I., whose 

children were: 

I. Anne, born July 6, 1730. 

II. Nathaniel, born August 26, 1732. 

III. Jeremiah, born May, 3, 1734, married, Newport, 
• R. I., September 19, 1765, Sarah, daughter of 

Joseph Wanton. She died at Bath, N. Y., 
April 29, 1813, aged 67 years, 11 months and 
11 days. He died Bath, N. Y., September 14, 
1815. 

IV. George, born May 17, 1736. 
V. James born F'eb. 14, 1737-8. 

Was John, the father of the above, a descendant of Gov. 
Jeremy Clarke, one of the settlers of the island of Rhode 
Island, and Governor of the Colony of R. I.? What was the 
maiden name of Elizabeth, the wife of John? 

Information is also wanted relative to Sarah Wanton, wife 
of Jeremiah Clarke. Was she a granddaughter of Gideon of 
Tiverton? Who were her Want®n ancestors? Correspondence 
solicited. 
IfOO Marshall Ave., St. Paul, Minn. Mrs. Charles E. Smith. 

38. Capt. James Morgan, of New London, 1694. — In 
July, 1694, Capt. James Morgan was appointed one of the 
committee "to agree with workmen for building a new meet- 
ing house, and managing the whole concern about it," at New 
London, Conn. Who was the James Morgan named? Can 

any one give information concerning him and his family? 

P. T. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 199 

39. Simmons. — Who were the parents of Deliv^erance 
Simmons, who married June 19, 1706, Walter, son of Benja- 
min and Phillippa (Sherman) Chace, of Portsmouth, R. I. 

W. C. 

40. Benson.— Who were the ancestors of John Benson' 
of Portsmouth, N. H., who married Hannah Brown, June 18' 
1724. H. T. T. 

41. Chapman-Kaighn. — Brenton Chapman, son of Peleg 
and Mary, of Newport, R. I., married Rebecca Kaighn, about 
1780, and had Elizabeth, Peleg and Rebecca. Rebecca, 
widow of Brenton Chapman, died Newport, R, I., Jan. 16, 
1813, aged 52. Any information relative to Brenton Chap- 
man or of the parents of his widow solicited. 

Newport, R. 1. R. H. Tilley. 

42. Clarke-Hacker. — Who were the parents of Rose 
Clarke? She married Seth Spooner, of Dartmouth, Mass., in 
1719. Tradition makes her a descendant of one of Gov. 
Walter Clarke's brothers. She named a son Walter. Who 
were the parents of Joshua Hackers wife, Martha, — — ? She 
was born about 1725, and died in Providence, R. I., 1797. 

Box 81, Providence, R, I. J. O. Austin. 

43. Cole. — Information wanted of descendants of Abra" 
ham^ and Samuel* Cole who were at Salem, about 1740; of 
Thomas'^, of Salem, who married there 1710; of Daniel, born 
1708, emigrated from Boxford, Mass., 1726; of Phineas^ 
Eliphalet^ and Sanluel^ brothers, all living 1793, the two first 
inPelham, N. H.; of Nathan, a Revolutionary soldier from 
Amherst (?) N. H. ; of the ten children of John^ who died 
in London, Canada. 1850, aged 87 ; of Jesse^ rb.l765); Moses^ 
(b. 1767) and SamueF (b. 1776), brothers, of Boxford, Mass; 
of Asa^ who married Sally Davis of Boxford, 1792; of Timo- 
thy and Benjamin, brothers, of Richmond, Mass. ; of DanieF, 
who went from Canada to Wisconsin in 1839; of Hiram, 
who died on borders of Lake Huron after 1826; of Davis S^, 
who was born 1817, and emigrated to Missouri. 

Columbus, 0. Frank T. Cole. 



I 



200 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

f^EPLilES. 



7. Windsor, Vt. Prison. Death of P. Fane. — Infor- 
mation relating to the Vermont State prison, and the death 
of P. Fane, can be found in ''Recollections of Windsor Prison, 
by John Reynolds, Boston, 1834." 

Chicago, 111. W. P. Baxter. 

12. Mayo. — The maiden name of Hannah, wife of John^ 
Mayo, grandson of Rev. John, was Freeman. She ' was 
daughter of Maj. John Freeman, of Eastham, Cape Cod, and 
Mercy Prence, daughter of Gov. Thomas Prence and Patience 
Brewster, daughter of Elder William Brew^ster, of the May- 
flower. 

The John^ Mayo above mentioned was son of SamueP, 
eldest son of Rev. John, and was born probably at Oyster 
Bay, Long Island, about 1656. 

6'^. Paul, Minn. Charles E. Mayo. 

25. Greene Family. — Nathaniel Greene, son of Jabez 
and Mary (Barker) Greene, was born Warwick,R. I., Nov. 4, 
1707, married, (1st) Phebe Greene, of Benjamin; (2d), Mary 
Mott of Jacob, and (3d), Mary Rodman, widow of John, and 
daughter of Samuel Collins, of Newport, R. I. He died in 
1770. His first wife died May 11, 1735. His children by 
first wife died young. His second wife, Mary, daughter of 
Jacob and Rest (Perry) Mott, to whom he was married 
April 18, 1739, was born April 25, 1708. She died March 7, 
1753. By 2d wife, Mary, he had: 

I. Jacob, b. March 7, 1788. 
II. Phebe, b. March 20, 1740-1. i 

III. Nathaniel, (General) b. July 27, 1742, d. June 

12, 1786. 

IV. William, b. Nov. 1, 1743. 
V. Elihu, b. Dec. 10, 1746. 

VI. Christopher, b. July 3, 1748. 
VII. Perry, b. Nov. 5, 1749, 
Newport, R. I. E. H. Turner. 



Inquisitions Post Mortem. 



CONTRIBUTED BY COL. J. S. VIVIAN, OF LONDON, ENGLAND. 




S it may interest the readers of the Magazine of New 
England History to obtain some information regarding 
the value of this class of English Records, I venture 
to send this article. 
This collection of records is now to be found in the Public 
Record Office in London, but like many others the documents 
are in many cases nearly illegible through past neglect. The 
Inquisition is of great value to the Genealogist showing as it 
does, the descent of landed property in families. During the 
feudal system the greater part of the land was held either 
mediately or immediately of the Crown, therefore on the 
death of each tenant "in capite" a tax called a relief was due 
to the King, and before the heir could take possession he was 
bound to pay this and also perform homage, after which 
livery was given him of his inheritance. When the heir was 
a minor, or the last holder had been attainted of treason or 
felony, the land in the former case escheated to the Crown 
till the heir attained his majority, made proof of his age and 
peiformed homage, in the latter case they reverted to the 
Crown forever. 

An "Escheator" was appointed for each County, whose 
duty it was to seize into the King's hands all lands held of 
the (^/rown ''in capite" on receiving a writ "De diem clausit 
extremum" commanding him to assemble a Jury to enquire 
1, What lands the party died seized of. 2, By what rents or 



202 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

services the same were held. 3, Who was his next heir and 
his age. 

The Inquisition was taken on oath and the verdict re- 
turned under the seal of the Jury, and upon that report the 
Crown acted. Space will not permit me to give a translation 
of a long Inquisition, but the following is a very short one 
and will serve our purpose equally well. 

''Devon. An Inquisition taken at Great Torrington in the 
aforesaid County, this 25th day of October in the 1st year of 
the reign of our sovereign Lord, Charles the first, by the 
Grace of God, King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland 
and Defender of the Faith, &c., before John Ratenbury, 
Gentleman, Escheator for our Lord the King, for the County 
aforesaid, by virtue of his olifice, to enquire after the death of 
Thomas Rowcliffe, late of Tarnscombe in the County afore- 
said. Gentleman, deceased. In the presence of John Were, 
Esquire Feodary of our Lord the King, for the County 
aforesaid, on the try oaths of Thomas Prust, Gentleman, 
Valentine Ley, Gentleman, Charles Yeo, Gentleman, Richard 
Prideaux, Gentleman, Philip Clarke, Gentleman, Richard 
Baylie, Gentleman, Samuel White, Thomas May, of Marland, 
Andrew Martin, Sebastian Carter, William Drewe, John 
Hutchins and Nicholas Raymond, who upon their solemn 
oath, say that the said Thomas Rowcliffe, on the day that he 
died was seized in his demesne as of fee of and in two parts 
of one Messuage, one garden, one orchard, twenty acres of 
land, three acres of meadow, twenty acres of pasture, twelve 
acres of wood and twenty acres of furse and heath with the 
appurtenances in Prescott and Hill in the Parish of Fristocke 
alias Frithelstocke in the County aforesaid, in the parts 
divided, parcel of the Manor of Frithelstocke, in the County 
aforesaid and so seized died, also the said Jury upon their 
oath say that the said two parts in three parts divided with 
their appurtenances at the time of the death of the said 
Thomas Rowcliffe were held of our Sovreign Lord, James, 
late King of England, and are now held of our Sovreign 
Lord, the King "in capite" by Military Service, but for what 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 203 

part of a Knight's fee they are ignorant, and that the yearly 
value of the same beyond the reprisals is thirty-two shillings 
and eight pence. And lastly the said Jury upon their sacred 
oath say that the said Thomas Rowcliffe, on the day he 
died held no other lands nor any other Messuages or tene- 
ments of our Lord Sovreign James, late King of England or 
of any other person "in capite" demesne, by service or use in 
the County aforesaid, or try elsewhere to their knowledge, 
and that the said Thomas Rowcliffe died on the 21st day of 
September in the 19th year of our Sovreign Lord James, late 
King of England, &c., and that George Rowcliffe, Gentle- 
man, is his son and next heir, and was at the time of the 
death of the said Thomas Rowcliffe, his father, of the age 
of twenty three years and more. In testimony of which the 
said Escheator and the said Jury have herewith placed their 
seals on the day and place aforesaid 1625." 

This is not an extensive Inquisition. Many contain the 
will of the deceased, references to and extracts from Deeds 
and other documents relating to property, showing several 
generations of descent from ancestors on the father's and 
mother's side, how land came into the family, the nature of 
the tenure being fully described, and the tenure was in itself 
a curiosity such as "by the presentation of a red rose at 
Christmas", "a pair of spurs when the Chief Lord came to 
hunt" at a certain place and so on. 

The return of the Jury having been engrossed on Parch- 
ment was returned with a writ or commission authorizing the 
Enquiry into the Kings Chancery, whence a copy was sent 
into the Exchequer, and those are the records now in ques- 
tion. They commence with the reign of King Henry III, and 
come down to the 20 Charles I, when there was an inter- 
mission of the business of the Court of Ward and Liveries 
which was established by Act of Parliament in the reign of 
Henry VIII, to prevent the abuse of compelling persons who 
were not tenants of the Crown to sue out their Livery, and 
with this most of the appendages offended tenure were 
abolished. 



204 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

The Irish Inquisitions do not commence before the reign 
of Elizabeth. 

The ''Returning of Special Service" for finding the heir 
to lands on the death of a holder are still in use in Scotland. 

A great number of these records were lost before they were 
removed to the Public Record Office, but many extracts from 
them are to be still found in the Manuscript Department in 
the British Museum. Of these Coles Escheats contained in 
Harl, Mss., 410, 411 and 756 to 760, are most valuable to 
the Genealogist. 

When Parish Registers fail us and will give little or even 
no information as to children of a deceased person an Inquisi- 
tion post mortem frequently gives everything we want, and 
supplies a long list of ancestors for whom we have vainly 
sought, As a Genealogist and Author of several Genealogi- 
cal books I am able to say that those records of the past have 
been of inestimable value to me. 



The Manufacture of Nails was one of the household 
industries of New England during the eighteenth century. 
P'isher Ames, in a speech in Congress, in 1789, said: "It has 
become common for the country people of Massachusetts to 
erect small forges in their chimney corners: and in winter, 
and in the evenings, when little other work can be done, 
great quantities of nails are made, even by children. These 
people take the rod iron of the merchant and return him the 
nails, and in consequence of that eas}^ mode of barter the 
manufacture is prodigiously great." In the history of Mid- 
dleborough, Mass., by Nehemiah Benet,1793, the author says 
that "the most common and general employment of the in- 
habitants of said town is agriculture, which seems to be in- 
creasing ; though there are a number of mechanicks. Nail- 
ing, or the business of making nails is carried on largely in 
the winters by the farmers and young men, who have but 
little other business at that season of the year." 



Record of Marriages, 

BY EEV. GARDNER THURSTON, PASTOR OF THE SECOND BAP- 
TIST CHURCH, NEWPORT, R. I. 

1759-1800. 



1781. 


Nov. 


5. 


Dec. 


6. 


1782. 


Jan. 


13. 


a 


17. 


i( 


31. 


Feb. 


21. 


Mar. 


25. 


Apr. 


11. 


C( 


14. 


a 


18. 


May 


10. 


i(. 


23. 


a 


24. 


11 


29. 


June 


Ifj. 



(Continued from page 146.) 



Clarke Brown and Mary Green. 

Jacob Mann, Jr., Wrentliam, Mass., and Mary 

Brownell, of Portsmouth, R. I. 

Simon Sprague, Exeter, and Abigail Holloway. 
John Baptist LeGrand, born in Britannia, and 
Betsey Traffore, New[)ort. 

Seth Tliomas, Portsmoutli, and Martha Prior, 
Newport. 

James Potter, Portsmouth, and Polly Stoddard, 
]\liddletown. 

George Perry and Abigail Williams. 
Mattliew SlocuQi and Elizabeth Cundall, Ports- 
mouth. 

Job Sisson and Anu Albro, Portsmonth. 
Benedict Lewis and Mary Cartwright. 
John Philli[)« and Pheby Ra}^ 
Benjamin Butts and Barberry Stafford. 
John Cahoone, Jr., and Elizal^eth Hudson. 
Nicholas P. Tillinghast and Sarah Almy. 
(Iiristoplier Biiboock, Jr,, Cliarlestowii, K. I., and 
Polly Potter, Middletown. 



206 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

June 20. John Franklin and Lidia Tears. 

" 23. Louis Gannot (French gentleman) and Mary Fry. 
Aug. 7. Joseph Perry and Hannali Knap. 

" 8. John Anton and Lidia Tears. 
Sept. 18. John Easton and Ruth Taylor. 

" 19. Green Burroughs and Sarah Tilley. 
Oct. 13. John Smith and Henryetta Easton. 
Nov. 9. William Parker and Darkis Gardner. 

" 24. Adam Wise and Rebecca Shearman. 
Dec. 4. Henry Peckham and Abigail Martin. 
" 6. Peter Treby and Patience Arnold. 
" 15. Thomas Smith and Sarah Robbards. 
" 22. Richard Baxby and Abigail Ingraham. 
1783. 
Jan. 5. Thomas Goddard and Sally Ambrose. 

" 5. Coggeshall Butts and Hannah Brayton. 
Mar. 17. Peleg Shearman, Portsmouth, and Biah Phillips. 

" 23. Thomas Mumford and Abigail Cory. 
Apr. 6. John Miller and Ann Scudder. 
" 8. Jacob Burk and Rebecca Bazell. 
27. Henry Gardner and Abigail Cane. 
27. Lewis Benner and Polly Paul. 
27. Nicholas Alger and Rebecca Colburne. 
May 11. Hendrick Peerham and Rachel Wanton. 
" 11. James Gavit and Lidia Thomas. 
" 25. William Burroughs and Susannah Burroughs. 
June 22. Alfred Arnold, Providence, and Amey Read, 
Newport. 
30. Thomas Weaver, Jr., Newport, and Jane Holmes, 
Taunton. 

John Sow — ell and Elizabeth Powers. 
Thomas Horswell, Portsmouth, and Amey Lake, 
Tiverton. 

Daniel Groseconit and Sarah Niel. 
William Borden and Mary Hardy. 
William Osborn and Hannah Read. 
Richard Chilcut and Elizabeth Thurston. 



(( 



a 



4( 



«i 


15. 


a 


16. 


Aug. 


5. 


Sept. 


14. 


a 


2L 


Oct. 


10. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 207 

Henry Mumford and Ruth Card. 

Hugh Wright and Mary Sisson. 

John Remmington and Phebe Card, Jamestown. 

Peter Daspre and Lavhiia Marlarmee. 

Nathaniel Horswell and Ruth Clarke. 

Anthony Cowell and Kitty Hargill. 

Giles Sanford and Marj^ Young. 

John Stevens and Mary Shephard. 

Henry Young and Freelove Gardner. 

Richard Card and Hannah Weedon. 

William Rider and Abigail Ward. 

John Fish and Elizabeth Cook, Portsmouth. 

Alexander Hamilton and Sally Lake. 

Thomas Angle, Great Britain, and Mary Spinner. 

William Dedwick and Mary Hammett. 

Anthony Adrick and Lidia Stewart. 

Thomas Potter and Ann Oldfield. 

Ricliard Clarke and Lidia Stanhope. 

Peter Hervey and Mary Morey. 

William Holmes and Betsey Coggeshall. 

John CoGr^'eshall and Susannah Burk. 

Jan. 6. William Pratt, Bristol, and Polly Lawton, New- 
port. 
'' 9. John Munroe, Bristol, and Elizabeth Munroe. 
'^ 28. Edward Stanhope and Mary Stall. 
Mar. 6. Georc^e Munroe and Rachel Aiken. 

G. Charles Morris and Huldah Coggesliall. 
14. Isaac Pearce, Swanzey, and Sally Bliss. 
May 3. Samuel Brooks and Phebe Slocum. 
'*• 8. Robert Potter and Rebecca Shaw. 
'' 8. Jenkins Perkins, South Kingston, and Eliza 

Wanton, Newton. 
'' 22. William Britton and Elizabeth Clarke. 
30, William Slocum and Mary Bailey. 

(To be continued.) £>.?-*» \ 



Oct. 


12. 


a 


16. 


a 


27. 


fcC 


28. 


a 


30. 


Dec. 


4. 


ii 


14. 


a 


25. 


1784. 


Jan. 


11. 


a 


25. 


a 


29. 


Feb, 


1. 


(w 


15. 


June 


13. 


(c 


20. 


Aug. 


15. 


ti 


20. 


Oct. 


3. 


4C 


rr 


(.i 


17. 


Nov. 


30. 


1785. 






u 



Book Notes. 



Publishers and authors wishing a notice in this department should send 
copies of their publications to R. H. Tilley, Newport, R. I. 



The Publication of Town Records is now being enconraged 
in many parts of the countiy, and there are indications that it will 
become general within a few years. In Rhode Island the births, 
marriages and deaths of every town in the State are being printed 
by authority of the General Assembly. In Massachusetts there is 
a movement to induce the printing of the records in all the older 
towns. Boston has already published twenty-two volumes, and 
will continue the work. Other places in Massachusetts that have 
printed, or are now printing, their records, are Amherst, Braintree, 
Brookline, Concord, Dedham, Groton, Lancaster, Manchester, 
Plymouth, and Woburn. 

Early Records of the Town of Providence, R. I. Vol. One, 
"being the first Book of the Town of Providence, otherwise called 
the 'Long Old Book' with Parchment cover," printed under 
authority of the City Council, by Hon. Horatio Rogers, Hon. 
George Moulton Carpenter and Edward Field Esq., Record Com- 
missioners, has recently made its appearance. The first volume is 
a valuable one, and, if the present commissioners are allowed to 
continue their work, is but a sample of what must follow. The 
volume of records selected for perpetuation in print is the earliest 
in date of the existing public records of the city, and has at differ- 
ent times been referred to in town documents as the "First Book 
of the Town of Providence," and "The Long Old Book with 
Parchment Cover." The earliest date mentioned in this volume 
is that of the birth of the first child of Roger Williams, Viz: 
"Mary ye daughter of Roger Williams and Mary his wife, was 
borne at Plymouth, ye first week in August, 1633 (so called.)" 

In presenting the book to the public the Commissioners say 
"that the object of the work required of them is the perpetuation 
in type of the records as they now exist, whereby the material may 
be preserved and become accessible to many who could not have 
access to the original. They have retained the old orthrography and 
have not attempted to correct the confusion in dates by any arbi- 
trary correction of their own discretion, for often times such so 
called correction would be more misleading than the evil attempted 
to be corrected. In short, their duty, as they understand it, is 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 209 

to present to the possessor of this book, as nearly as possible, the 
same information which he would receive from a perusal of the 
original." The book has a good index. Providence. 1892. 

History of Westborough, Mass. — The Committee in charge of 
the' History of Westborough, Mass., are now ready to receive 
orders for this book, which has been in course of preparation for 
four years. The work was compiled by Rev. Heman P. De 
Forest, of Detroit, Mich., (formerly pastor of the Westborough 
Evangelical Church) and Hon. Edward C. Bates of Westborough, 
and covers the history of the town from the days of Indian occu- 
pancy to the present 3^ear. Mr. DeForest has sketched, in a re- 
markably interesting and readable style, the struggles and suffer- 
ings of the early settlers, their character and manner of life, the 
patriotic action of the town in Revolutionary days, and the princi- 
pal events in the early part of the present century. Judge Bates 
continues the history to the present year. The Appendix contains 
biographical sketches of men prominent in the town's history, an 
exceedingly valual)le chapter by Judge William T. Forbes on 
the land grants within the territory of the town, lists of the more 
important town officers from 1717 to 1890, the Rev. Ebenezer 
Parkman's sketch of the history of Westborough (written in 1767), 
and much other valuable information. 

The illustrations, mostly' b}' the pliotogravure process, are ex- 
ceedingly^ good. Inchuling botli portraits and views they number 
thirty-four. A map, especially prepared for this history, adds 
value to the book. 

The printing has been done by John Wilson & Son, of the 
University I*ress, Cambridge, Mass., in the most tasteful manner. 
Orders should be sent to George B. Brigham, Joshua E. Beeman, 
or Charles S. Henry, Committee on Publication. 

Strobridge, Morrison or Morison, Strawbridge. — An inter- 
esting and valuable work on the families of Strorbridge and Morri- 
son, by Mary Stiles (Paul) Guild, of Lynn, Mass., has recently 
been i)ublished. It contains a record of the descendants of William 
Strobridge, who came to America from Ireland, early in the last 
century, and settled in Middleborough, Mass., where he died Nov. 
14, 1777, at the age of 87 years. The descendants of William 
Morrison, son of Robert, who settled at North Bridgewater, Mass., 
in 1740, is also given. Much information relating to the Strawbridge 
family in America forms Part III of the volume. While this in- 
teresting and faithfully wrought volume has all the substantial 
qualities of our best genealogical works, its departure from the 
usual method in which such books are written adds greatly to its 
value and interest, and makes it instructive to a large class of 
readers. It has an excellent index and is handsomely printed 
with nun^erous fine portraits. 8 Vo. pp. XXIX-299. Edition 
limited to 500 Copies. 



210 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Records ok Wokckstek, Mass. — The publiciition of the Wor- 
cester Records has been Jidvtinced so far that its completion is 
now a matter of easy accomplishment. A period of one hundred 
and forty-nine years has been covered, leaving to be printed only 
the Records of thirty-two years and the Births and Marriages, to 
complete the history of the Town organization. The printing of 
the Records was begun in 1878 by The Worcester Society of 
Antiquity, and carried on successfully for five years, when lack of 
funds compelled a suspension of the work. In 1889 the under- 
taking was resumed under an arrangement by which the City and 
the Society share the expense, and appropriations have been made 
towards the printing of two volumes, one of which has been issued, 
and the other is now in press. Below is a list of the volumes 
published : ^ 

1. Record of Deaths in Worcester to 1825. 

2. PEARLY Records OF Worcester, 1722 to 1739. 

3. Early Records of Worcester, 1740 to 1753. 

4. Records of the Proprietors, 1667 to 1788. (With near- 
ly 300 plans) 

5. Worcester Town Records, 1754 to 1783. . 

6. Worcester Town Records, 1784 to 1800. 

7. Worcester Town Records, 1801 to 1816. 
The following remain to be printed : 

8. Worcester Town Records1817 to 1832. {In Press.) 

9. Worcester Town Records, 1833 to 1848. 

10. Births and Marriages, from the earliest to 1848. 

Vermont History.— The address on "Points in Vermont His- 
tor3^*' delivered January 27, before the Boston Vermont Associa- 
tion, by Col. J. H. Benton Jr., has been issued in pamphlet form, 
and is both entertaining and instructive. From July 30,1609, 
when Vermont was first known to the white man, at the battle 
between the Iroquois and Lieutenant-Governor Champlain, of New 
Fi-ance, down through the Revolution, the War of 1812, and the 
civil war, Mr. Benton in this address, gives many choice bits of 
history not mentioned in the stereotyped work of the historian. 

The Stanton Genealooy, by Rev. William Stanton, D D., has 
recently been issued from the press of JoelMunsell's sons, Albany, 
N. Y. An interesting record of the descendants of Thomas Stan- 
ton, who came to America in lu35 and settled near Westerly, R. 
I., is given in the work. Besides genealogical statistics, the volume 
contains much in the way of old wills, inventories, and extracts 
from Town and State records. By intermarriage with the Stan- 
tons, the records of manj^ of the early settlers in southwestern R. 
I., are given, these include the Palmer, Noyes, Denison, Chese- 
borough, Wheeler, Babcock, Thompson, Williams and other 
families. The book is printed in new t^^pe, bound in red morocco, 
presenting a handsome octa\o volume of 613 pages. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 211 

History of Industry, Maine. — For ten years Dr. William C. 
Hatch, of Stark, Somerset County, Maine, has been engaged in 
writing a history of the Town of Industry, Maine. The contract 
for printing has been awarded to Knowlton, McLeary & Co., of 
Farmington, whose reputation for fine printing is well known. The 
contractors are already at work, and are putting the Ms. in type 
as rapidly as is compatible with accuracy and good workmansliip. 
The book, beside giving a full and concise history of the town 
from its earliest settlement in 1787 down to the present time, will 
contain numerous full-page illustrations, including portraits of 
many prominent citizens of the past as well as of the present gen- 
eration. The genealogical portion will contain numerous family 
histories, many with their complete ancestral line back to the 
immigrant ancestor including such names as Allen, Ames, Atkin- 
son, Bailey, Bean, Benson, Bradbury, Bryant, Boyden, Burgess, 
Boardman, Butler, Burns, Brown, Beedy, Collins, Cottle, Corn- 
forth, Caswell, Crompton, Cutler, Cutts, Daggett, Davis, Drew, 
Emery, Eveleth, Ellis, Edwards, Edgecomb, Elder, Fassett, Fish, 
Fogg, FoUett, Folsom, Frost, Furbush, Goodridge, Goodwin, 
Gower, Greenleaf, Greenwood, Gilmore, Hammond, Harris, 
Hatch, Hayes, Higgins, Hildreth, Howes, Hilton, Hobbs, Hinkley, 
Jenniugs, Jewett, Johnson, Look, Luce, Manter, Mason, Meader, 
Merrill, Merry, Mood}^ Marshall, Morse, Norcross, Norrton, 
Nichols, Oliver, Page, Fatterson, l*ike, Pollard, Pinkham, Pekins, 
Rackliff, Pnndall, Peinick, lvol)bins, Kogers, Roach, Rand, Shorey, 
Shaw, Smith, Stanley, Swift, Sullivan, Stevens, Stimpsou, Spin- 
ney, Seavey, Speucer, Stetson, Spaulding, Thompson, Thing, 
Tolmau, Trafton, Trask,Tibbetts, Tliwing, True, Viles, Vehue, 
AVade, Watson, AVest, Willard, Williamson, Willis, Withee, 
Winslow, Wilson, Withaui, Webster, etc., etc. This work will 
be printed from new type, on fine paper, and haudsomely bound 
in cloth, with orujimeutcd back, forming a compact volume of 500 
octavo pages. This valuable work will l3e sold to a few more sub- 
scribers at the very low price of $2.50 per copy. The edition 
limited to 100 copies, is nearly taken up and under no considera- 
tion will more than this number be printed ; hence, first come first 
served. 

POHTRAITS OF G FNKKAL WiLLIAM WniPPLE AND AdMIRAL DaVID 

G. P'ahuagut. — We have received from Paymaster Joseph Foster, 
U. S. N., Portsmouth, N. H., a copy of a pamphlet compiled by 
him on the recent presentation of the portraits of General William 
AVhipple and Admiral ]:)avid (i. Farragut to the Whipple and 
Farragut Schools of Portsmouth, N. H. The pamphlet gives a 
full account of the presentation ceremonies, together with much 
data relating to General Whipple's ancestors and to the Ports- 
u^o^th ancestry of James Russell Lowell. 



212 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

History of Lancaster, N. H. — The committee chosen to com- 
pile the Lancaster town history are making good progress. The 
several ministers in town will write np the history of the ehnrches. 
James W. Weeks has been assigned the early histcry of the town, 
its inhabitants and their characteiistics ; Jndge Everett Fletcher 
the legal and jndicial history, a description of the conrt honses, 
jails and other bnildings, and the probate conrt ; Col. Henry O. 
Kent, the Military, Masonic and other secret societies ; James S. 
Brackett the educational systems ; J. I. Williams the geological 
and topographical, and Hon. C. B. Jordan the political history. 
Other minor parts have been assigned to different individuals. 



f^ecent Pablicatiops. 

Descendants of George Wheeler of Concord, Mass., 1638, 
through Deacon Thomas Wheeler, of Concord, 1696, and of John 
Warren, of Boston, Mass., through Ebenezer Warren, of Leicester, 
Mass., 1744. Compiled by Henry Warren Wheeler. Albany, N. 
Y., Joel Munsell's Sons, Publishers, 1892. $3.00. 

The Original Mother Goose Melody, as issued b}^ John New- 
berry, of London, circa 1760, Isaiah Thomas of Worcester, Mass., 
circa 1785 ; and Munroe & Francis of Boston, circa 1825. Repro- 
duced in facsimile, from the first Worcester edition, with intro- 
ductory note by ^William H. Whitmore, etc., etc., Boston ; Damrell 
& Upham. 

A History of the First Regiment of Massachusetts Cavalry 
Volunteers, by B. W. Crowninshield, Brevet vColonel. With a 
Map, numerous Portraits, and other illustrations. 8vo, $6.00. 

Early Nevt England People. — Some accounts of the Ellis, 
Pemberton, Willard, Prescott, Titcombe, Sewall, and Longfellow, 
and allied families, by Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, 8 vo. 288 pages, 
$2.00. Address the author, 618 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

Vermont, A Study of Independence, b}" Rowland E. Robinson, 
(American Commonwealths.) Edited b}^ Horace E. Scudder. 
Boston and New York ; Houghton, Mifflin & Company. 

Town Records of Manchester, Mass., from 1718 to 1769, as 
contained in the "Commoners' Records," and the "Fourth Book 
of Town Records," 1736 to 1786. Vol. II, Salem, Mass., 1891. 
8 Vo. pp. 212. 

The Beckw^iths. By Paul Beckwith, Albany, N. Y., 1891. 8 vo. 
pp. 384. Address the author, Paul Beckwith, St. Louis, Mo. 

First Re-Union of the Hills Family of Franklin, Mass.. with 
Historical Notes. By Edwin M. Hills. C. A. Hack & Son; Taun- 
ou, Mass., 1891, 8 vo. pp. 47. 



]V^GAZINE OfJ\(eW ^NGLANDjflSTORY 

Vol 2. October, 1892. No. 4 

John Myles. 

RELIGIOUS TOLERANCE IN MASSACHUSETTS.* 



BY HON. THOMAS W. BICKNELL, BOSTON, MASS. 




^^ OMETIME since, while ransacking colonial, chiircli, 
^ ' ^ and family records for the materials of a town history, 
I came across a fignre that intei'ested me deeply, and 
if I can present his lineaments and ontline his work 
in any trne sense, I hope I ma}^ satisfy you for your pi-esence 
for an hour. To me the man seemed unique and his life 
fascinatiufr thouofli not eminent. All that has been written 
of him, I dare say, would not cover ten duodecimo pages, 
but he worked so sweetly and quietly in troublous times and 
with all so effectual 1}', and in an obscure corner of our 
colonial life, illusti-ated his faitli by his works in so charitable 
and so peaceable a manner, that in his miuistrations and influ- 
ence, those who came to scoff remained to pray. His own 
denomination be taught moderation and liberality. The men 
of the ruling Puritan Church he conquered by love. An 
outline picture of his life and times has helped me to under- 
stand better the character of the men who founded our city 
and commonwealth, and has suggested valuable lessons in 
the development of civil and religious freedom, and the 

*Read before the Bostonian Society, Old State House, Boston, March 
8, 1892. 



214 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

sacredness of the conscience as tlie Ark of the Covenant of 
individual, and social progress and evolution. If I needed 
an apology for introducing my hero, I should say to you that 
the significance of his life springs out of events which trans- 
pired beneath "the droppings of this sanctuary", and that his 
family found a fit representative in the rectorate of King's 
Chapel from 1689 to 1728, the longest pastorate save that of 
the Rev. Dr. James Freeman, that has honored this venerable 
chapel, a place of sacred memories and service. It has not 
been an unusual thing for Boston and Massachusetts to be 
theological storm centres, and it is to the scenes and discus- 
sions of one of the earliest, most vigorous and most deter- 
mined of these contests with "the Prince of thepowei'sof the 
air" that your interested attention is invited. 

As the son of Pilgrim and Puritan ancestry, I must pre- 
face what I have to say of my ecclesiastical friend,by a word 
as J;o the common purpose of the founders of Boston and 
Salem and Weymouth and Plymouth. These good men and 
women came to America for several good and sufficient 
reasons: one was to find comfortable rest from the deep 
political and religious unrest of the mother land. Spiritually 
they had found an enlightment above most of their fellow 
countrymen, and finding themselves growing out of sympathy 
with what was transpiring about them, tliey looked about for 
a city of refuge to which to flee. Men they were with a 
new revelation, heretics if you please, honest, sincere, devout, 
godly, and tremendously in earnest. John Milton and Oliver 
Cromwell belonged to their order ; so did Harry Vane, once 
governor of Massachusetts, the defender of Quakers, Bap- 
tists, Roman Catholics and Presbyterians, who suffered death 
at the Restoration with Hugh Peters, once the minister at 
Salem and one of the founders of Harvard College. These 
early New England people wished, as they thought they had 
a right to ask, to be let alone as to religious concerns, and if 
not in Old England then in New England, or some other 
corner of the earth, they would seek out their coveted rest. 
Toleration, to them, meant to be independentand undisturbed 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 215 

in the enjoyment of their religious principles and prerogatives. 
As to letting others alone, whose presence and influence 
seemed to them intolerant and to threaten their own quiet, 
was another matter. The Boston Puritan had no use in tho 
17th Century for a Baptist, a Quaker, a Churchman or a 
Catholic. Their presence on Boston soil was a menace to the 
solidarity of Puritanism in which he implicitly believed. 
What he regarded as errors in religion was also considered 
treason to the commonwealth. 

Cotton Mather says, ''It was also thought that the very 
Quakers themselves would say that if they had got into a 
corner of the world, and with an immense toyle and change 
made a wilderness habitable, on purpose there to be undis- 
turbed in the exercise of their worship, they would never bear 
to have New Englanders come among them and interrupt 
their public worship, endeavor to seduce their children from 
it, yea and repeat such endeavors after mild entreaties, first, 
and then banishment, to oblige their departure." 

On the 13th of November, 1644, the General Court of 
Massachusetts Bay, John Endicott, governor, expressed its 
ideas of the Anabaptists in such legislation as this: 

''Forasmuch as experience hath plentifully and often proved 
that since the first arising of the Anabaptists, about a hun- 
dred years since, they have been the incendiaries or common- 
wealths, and the infectors of persons in main matters of re- 
ligion and the troublei's of churches in all places where they 
have been, and that they who have held the baptizing of 
infants unlawful have usuall}^ held other errors or heresies 
together therewith, tliough they have (as other hereticks use 
to do) conceded the same, till they spied out a fit advantage 
and opportunity to vent them by way of questions or scruple ; 
and whereas divers of this kind have, since our coming into 
New England, appeared amongst ourselves, some whereof 
have (as others before them) denied the ordinance of magis- 
tracy, and the lawfulness of making war, and others the law- 
fulness of magistrates, and their inspection into any branch 
of the first table ; which opinions, if they should be connived 



216 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOKY. 

at by us, arc like to he increased amongst us, and so must 
necessarily bring guilt upon us, infection and trouble to the 
churches and hazard to the commonwealth : 

It is ordered and agreed, that if any person or persons 
within this jurisdiction shall either openly condemn or oppose 
the baptizing of infants, or go about secretly to seduce others 
from the approbation or use thereof, or shall purposely depart 
the congregation at the administration of the ordinance, or 
shall deny the ordinances of the magistracy, or their lawful 
right or authority to make war, or to punish the outward 
breaches of the first table, and shall appear to the Court, 
wilfully and obstinately to continue therein after due time 
and means of conviction, every such person or persons shall 
be sentenced to banishment." Records of Colony of Massa- 
chusetts Bay. Vol. II. page 85. 

Laws of like tenor and equal severity were made b}^ Ply- 
mouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies against Rantors or 
Quakers. Such was the reasoning of the combined legal, 
ecclesiastical and lay judgment of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, two hundred and fifty years ago. 

Our fathers established a state church that they might 
express as strongly as a \\q^ society could its belief in homo- 
geneity in all matters relating to the social, civil and re- 
ligious order. The Puritan would solve the problem of re- 
ligious freedom by a process of social and theological differ- 
entiation and segregation. Roger Williams might set up his 
church and its worship in Providence, and so might Lord 
Baltimore in Marjdand, under protest, but not in Salem or 
Plymouth, or Boston. ' The New Englander's ideal govern- 
ment was church and state. He knew that France was the 
Catholic church, that England was the Establishment, and 
what he desired for Massachusetts Bay was a Puritan State, 
sincere, pure, without adulteration. The Bible was the best 
Statute Book for the Puritan ; and Puritan divines, well 
educated and learned must be its supreme legal expounders. 
Hence Harvard College with its motto "Christo et Ecclesiae," 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 217 

where godly men should be taught doctrine and duty so that, 
they in their turn should guide the brethren to intelligent 
convictions and a vigorous defence of the same. 

With such conceptions of the state as a divine institution 
after the Mosaic fashion of the Hebrew commonwealth which 
they so carefully studied and patterned, it is not strange to 
see what was the most natural thing for them to do ; the 
very thing we are doing every day, namely, resist, as Gen. 
Walker proposes, the incoming of dangerous elements and 
the proper education and discipline, if need be, of the in- 
tractible and incorrigible, already within the fold of the 
Commonwealth. According to Puritan standards the Bap- 
tist, the Quaker and other dissentients had better stay at 
home on the English side of the Atlantic, for all concerned, 
but once here, they must hold their tongues or have them 
held by Puritan nippers. 

My story is a sim[)le unfolding of a chapter in ecclesiastical 
colonial history in the second half of the first century of our 
New England life. I may as well begin with the departure 
of Roger Williams, the great Baptist protestant and his 
migration to Rhode Island. 

The act of banishment which severed Roger Williams from 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 16^5, was the means of 
advancing rather than hindering, the spread of the so-called 
heresies which he so bravely advocated. As the persecutions 
which drove the disciples of Ciirist from Jerusalem were the 
means of extending the cause of Christianity, so the princi- 
ples of toleration and of soul-liberty were strengthened by 
opposition, in the mind of tins a[)ostle of freedom of con- 
science in the new world. His Welsh birth and Puritan 
education made him a bold and earnest advocate of whatever 
truth his conscience approved, and he went everywhere 
"preaching the word" of individual freedom. The sentence 
of exile could not silence his tongue, nor destroy his in- 
fluence. ''The divers new and dangerous opinions" which 
he had '^broached and divulged," though hostile to the 



218 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

notions of the clergy and the anthorities of Massachusetts 
Bay, were at the same time quite acceptable to a few brave 
souls, who, like himself, dared the censures and even the 
persecutions of their brethren, for the sake of liberty of con- 
science. 

The dwellers in old Rehoboth were the nearest white 
neighbors of Rog-er Williams and his band at Providence. 
The Rev. Samuel Newman was the pastor of the church in 
this ancient town, having removed with the lirst settlers from 
Weymouth in 1643, Learned, godly and hospitable as he 
was, he had not reached the "height of that great argument," 
concerning human freedom, and while he cherished kindly 
feeUngs towards the dwellers at Providence, he evidentl}^ 
feared the introduction of their sentiments among his people. 
The jealous care of Newman to preserve what he conscien- 
tiously regarded as the purity of religious faith and polity, 
was not a sufficient barrier against the teachings of the 
founder of Rhode Island. 

Although the settlers of Plymouth Colony cherished more 
liberal sentiments than their neighbors of the Bay Colony, 
and sanctioned the expulsion of Mr. Williams from Seekonk 
only for the purpose of preserving peace with those whom 
Blackstone called "the Lord Bretheren," yet they guarded 
the prerogatives of the ruling church order as worthy not 
only of the respect^hut also the support of all. Rehoboth, was 
the most liberal, as well as the most loyal of the children of 
Plymouth, but the free opinions which the planters brought 
from Weymouth, where an attempt had already been made 
to establish a Baptist church, enabled them to sympathize 
strongly with their neighbors across the Seekonk river. "At 
this time," says Baylies, "so much indifference as to the sup- 
port of the clergy was manifested in Plymouth Colony, as to 
excite the alarm of the other confederated colonies. The 
complaint of Massachusetts against Plymouth on this sub- 
ject, was laid before the Commissioners, and drew fi'om them 
a severe reprehension. Rehoboth had been afflicted with a 
serious schism, and by its proximity to Providence and its 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 219 

plantations, where there was a universal toleration, the 
practice of free inquirj^ Avas encouraged, and principle, fancy, 
whims and conscience, all conspired to lessen the veneration 
for ecclesiastical authority." As the "serious schism" re- 
ferred to above led to the foundation of the first Baptist 
Church within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, on New 
Meadow Neck in Old Swansey, it is worthy of record here. 

The leader in this church revolt was Obadiah Holmes, a 
native of Preston, in Lancashire, England. He was con- 
nected with the church in Salem from 1689 till 1646, when 
he was excommunicated, and removing with his family to 
Rehoboth, he joined Mr. Newman's church. The doctrines 
and the discipline of this church proved too severe for Mr. 
Holmes, and he, with eight others, withdrew in 1649, and 
established a new church by themselves. Mr. Newman's 
irascible temper was kindled into a persecuting zeal against 
the offending brethren, and, after excommunicating them, he 
aroused the civil authorities against them. So successful 
was he that four petitions were presented to the Plymouth 
Court; one from Rehoboth, signed by thirty-five persons; 
one I'rom Taunton ; one from all the clergymen in the colony 
but two, and one from the government of Massachusetts. 

Massachusetts Bay Colony had heard of the ongoings and 
the undoings at Seekonk, and the General Court sitting in 
Boston under date of October 18, 1649, John Endicott still 
governor, sent the following letter to tlie Plymouth General 
Court: 

^'Honored and I>eloved Brethren, We have heard hereto- 
fore of divci-s Anabaptists, arisen up in your jurisdiction,but 
being but few, we well hoped that it miglithave pleased God 
by the endeavors of youi'selves, and the faithful elders with 
you, to have reduced such erring men again into tiie right 
way. But now to our great grief, we are credibly informed 
that your patient bearing with such men hath produced 
another effect, namely, the multiplying and increasing of the 
same errors, and we fear maybe of other eiTors also, if timely 
care be not taken to suppress the same. Particularly, we 



220 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

understand that witliin these few weeks there have been at 
Seekonk, (Sea Cuncke) thirteen or fourteen persons rebap- 
tized, (a swift progress in one town,) yet Ave hear uot of any 
effeetual restriction is intended thereabouts. Let it not, we 
pray you, seem presumptions in us to mind 3^ou hereof, nor 
that we earnestly entreat you to take care as well of the sup- 
pressing of erroi's as of the maintenance of truth, God equally 
requiring tlie performance of both at tlie hands of Christian 
magistrates, but rather that you will consider our interest 
is concerned therein. The infection of such diseases, being 
so many, are likely to spread into our jurisdiction ; 'tunc 
tua res agitur paries cum proximus ardet.' We are united 
by confederacy, by faith, by neighborhood, by fellowship in 
our sufferings as exiles, and by other Christian bonds, and we 
'hope neither Sathan [Satan] nor any of his instruments, shall 
by this or any other errors, disunite us, and that we shall 
never have to repent us of our so near conjunction with you, 
but that we shall both so equally and zealously uphold all 
the truths of God revealed, that we may render a comfortable 
account to Him that hath set us in our places, and he- 
trusted us with the keeping of both tables, of which well 
hoping, we cease your farther troubles, and rest. 

Your very loving friends and brethren." 

How will the authorities at Plymouth treat this first divi- 
sion in the ruling church of the colony? Will they punish 
by severe fines, by imprisonment, by scourgings, or by ban- 
ishment? By neither, for a milder spirit of toleration pre- 
vailed, and the separatists were simply directed to ''refrain 
from practices disagreeable to their brethren, and to appear 
before the Court." 

In 1651, sometime after his trial at Plymouth, Mr. Holmes 
was arrested, with Mr. Clarke, of Newport, and Mr. Crandall, 
for preaching and worshipping God with some of their breth- 
ren at Lynn. They were condemned by the Court at Boston 
to suffer fines or whippings, — Clarke <£20, Holmes X30 and 
Crandall £5. Holmes refused to pay the fine, and would 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 221 

not allow his friends to pay it for him, saying that, ''to pay 
it would be acknowledging himself to have done wrong," 
whereas liis conscience testified that he had done right, and 
he durst not accept deliverance in such a way. He was 
accordingly punished with thirty lashes from a three-corded 
whip, on Boston Common, with such severity, says Gov. 
Jenks, ''that in many days, if not some weeks, he could take 
no rest, but as he lay upon his knees and elbows, not being 
al)le to suffer any part of his body to touch the bed whereon 
he lay." "You have struck me with roses," he said to his 
tormentors. Soon after this, Holmes and his followers moved 
to Newport, and, on the death of Rev. Mr. Clarke, in 1676, 
he succeeded him as pastor of the First Baptist Church in 
that town. Mr. Holmes died at Newport in 1682, aged 76 
years. 

The persecution offered to the Rehoboth Baptists, scat- 
tered their church, but did not destroy their principles. 
F'acijig the oblo(|uy attached to their cause, and braving 
the trials imposed by the civil and ecclesiastical powers, they 
must wait patiently God's time of deliverance. That their 
lives were free from guile, none claim. That their cause 
was righteous, none will deny, and while the elements of a 
Baptist church were thus gathering strength and purification 
on this side of the Atlanlic, a leader was prepared for them, 
by God's providence on the other. Jn the same year that 
Obadiah Holmes and his band established their church in 
Massachusetts, in opposition to the Puritan order, Charles 
tlie First, the great English traitor, expiated his "high crimes 
and misdemeanors" on the scaff'old at the hands of a Puritan 
Parliament. Then followed the period of the Commonwealth 
under Cromwell, and then the Restoration, when "there 
arose up a new king over Egypt, who knew not Joseph." 
The Act of Uniformity, passed in 1662, under the sanction 
of Chailes the Second, though a fatal blow at the purity and 
piety of the English church, was a royal blessing to the cause 
of religion in America. Two thousand bravely conscientious 
men, who feared God more than the decrees of the Pope, 



222 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGI-AND HISTORY. 

King or Parliament, were driven from their livings and from 
the kingdom. What was England's great loss was America's 
great gain, for a grand tidal wave of emigration swept west 
ward across the Atlantic to our shores. Godly men and 
women, clergy and laity, made up this exiled band, too true 
and earnest to yield a base compliance to the edict of con- 
formity. For thirteen years, have the Dissenters from Mr. 
Newman's church waited for a spiritual guide, but not in 
vain; for among the number who sought a refuge from re- 
ligious oppression, we find John Myles, of Swansea, Wales. 

How our Baptist brethren have conducted tliemselves 
during these years, and the difficulties they may have occa- 
sioned or encountered, we know but little. Plymouth, lib- 
eral already, has grown more lenient towards church offend- 
ers in matters of conscience. Mr. John Brown, a citizen of 
Rehoboth, and one of the magistrates, has presented before 
the court his scruples at the expediency of coercing the peo- 
ple to support the ministry, and has offered to pay from his 
own property the taxes of all those of his townsmen who may 
refuse their support of the ministry. This was in 1655. 
Massachusetts Bay has tried to correct tlie errors of her sister 
colony on the subject of toleration, and has in turn been 
rebuked by her example. 

Leaving the membership awhile, let us cross over to Wales 
to find their future pastor and teacher, John Myles. 

Wales had been the asylum for the persecuted and op" 
pressed for many centuries. There freedom of religious 
thought was tolerated, and from thence sprung Oliver Crom- 
well and John Myles. About the year 1645, the Baptists in 
that country, who had previously been scattered and con- 
nected with other churches, began to unite in the formation 
of separate churches, under their own pastors. Prominent 
among these was the Rev. Mr. Myles, who preached in vari- 
ous places with great success, until the year 1649, when we 
find him pastor of a church which he organized in Swansea, 
South Wales. It is a singular coincidence that the termina- 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 223 

tion of Mr. Myles' pastorate at Swansea, and tlie separation 
of the members from the Rehoboth church, a part of whom 
aided in establishing the church in Swansej, Mass. occurred 
in the same year. 

During the Protectora<"e of Cromwell, all dissenters en- 
joyed the largest liberty of conscience in the mother land, 
and, as a result, the church at Swansea grew from forty-eight 
to three hundred souls. Around tliis centre of influence 
sprang up several branch churches, and pastors were raised 
up to care for them. Mr. Mjdes soon became the leader of 
his denomination in Wales, and in 1651 he was sent as the 
representative of all the Baptist churches in Wales to the 
Baptist Ministers' meeting, at Glazier's Hall, London, with 
a letter, giving an account of the peace, union and increase 
of the work. As a preacher and worker he had no equal in 
that country, and his zeal enabled him to establish many new 
churches in his native land. The act of the English Saint 
Bartholomew's Day, in 1662, deprived Mr. Myles of the sup- 
port which the government under Cromwell had gi-anted him, 
and he, with many others, chose the freedom of exile to the 
tyranny of an unprincipled monarch. It would be interest- 
ing for us to give an account of his leave taking of his 
churcii at Swansea, and of his associates in Christian labor, 
and to trace out his passage to Massachusetts, and to relate 
the circumstances which led him to search out and to find the 
little band of Baptists at Rehoboth. Surely some law of 
spiritual gravitation or aflinity under the good hand of God 
thus raised up and brought this under-.shepherd to the flock 
thus scattered in the wilderness. 

Nicliolas Tanner, Obadiah Brown, John Thomas, and 
others, accompanied Mr. Myles in his exile from Swansea, 
Wales. The first that is known of them in America was the 
formation of a Baptist churcli at the house of John Butter- 
worth in Rehoboth, Mr. Myles and his followers had probably 
learned at Boston, or at Plymouth, of the treatment offered 
to Holmes and his party ten years before, and his sympathies 
led him to seek out and unite the elements which persecution 



224 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

liad scattered. Seven members made up tliis infant church, 
viz.: John Myles, pastor, James Brown, Nicholas Tanner, 
Joseph Carpenter, John Buttervvorth, Ehhad Kingsley and 
Benjamin Alby. The pi-inciples to which their assent was 
given were the same as those held by tlie Welsh Baptists, as 
expounded by Mr. M3des. The original record book of the 
church contains a list of the members of Mr. Myles' church 
in Swansea, from 16J:0till 1660, with letters, decrees, ordi- 
nances, &c., of the several churches of the denomination in 
England and Wales. This book, now in the possession of 
the First Baptist Churcli in Swanzey, Mass. is probably a 
copy of the original Welsh records, made by or for Mr. 
Myles' church in Massachusetts, and the sentiments of which 
controlled their actions here. 

Of the seven constituent members, only one was a mem- 
ber of Myles' church in Wales, Nicholas Tanner. The oth- 
ers were probably residents of Rehoboth at the time of their 
arrival. James Brown was a son of John Brown, both 
of whom held high offices in the Plymouth colony. Mr. 
Newman and his church were again aroused at the revival 
of this dangerous sect, and they again united with the other 
orthodox churches of the colony in soliciting the Court to 
interpose its influence against them, and the members of 
thi^ little church were each fined five pounds, for setting up 
a public meeting without the knowledge and approbation of 
the Court, to the disturbance of the peace of the place; or- 
dered to desist from their meeting for the space of a month, 
and advised to remove their meeting to some other place 
where they might not prejudice any other church. The 
worthy magistrates of Plymouth have not told us how these 
few Baptist brethren ''disturbed the peace" of quiet old 
Rehoboth. Ancient Rehoboth, that roomy place, was not 
big enough to contain this church of seven members, and we 
have to-day to thank the spirit of Newman and the order of 
Plymouth Court for the handful of seed corn, which they 
threw away on the waters, which took root in Swansey and 
has brought forth the fruits of a sixty fold growth. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 225 

From a careful reading of the first covenant of the church, 
we judge that it was a breach of ecclesiastical, rather than 
of civil law, and that the fines and banishment from the 
limits of Rehoboth were imposed as a preventative against 
any further inroads upon the membership of Mr. Newman's 
church. In obedience to the orders of the Court, the 
members of Mr. Myleg' church looked about for a more 
convenient dwelling place, and found it, as near to the 
limits of the old town and their original homes, as the law 
would allow. Within the bounds of old Swansey, in Mass. 
the northern part of the present town of Barrington, R. I. 
they selected a site for a church edifice. Here they planted 
their first spiritual home, and enjoyed a peace which pastor 
and people had long sought for. 

The original covenant is a remarkable paper, toned with 
deep piety and a broad and comprehensive spirit of Christian 
fellowship. ■ 

HOLY COVENANT. 

Swansey in New England. — A true copy of the Holy Cov- 
enant the first founders of Swansey Entered into at the first 
beginning and all the members thereof for Divers years. 

Whereas we Poor Creatures are through the exceeding 
Riches of Gods Infinite Grace Mercyfully snatched out of the 
Kingdom of darkness and by his Infinite Power translated 
into the Kingdom of his dear Son, there to be partakers with 
all the Saints of all those Privileges which Christ by the 
Shedding of his Pretious Blood hath purclmsed for us, and 
that we do find our Souls in Some good Measure wrought on 
by Divine Grace to desire to be Conformable to Christ in all 
things, being also constrained by the matchless love and 
wonderfuU Distinguishing Mercies that we Abundantly 
Injoy from his most free grace to Serve him according to our 
utmost capacitys, and that we also know that it is our most 
bounden Duty to Walk in Visible Communion with Christ 
and Each other according to the Prescript Rule of his most 
holy word, and also that it is our undoubted Right through 



226 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Christ to Tnjoy all the Privileges of Gods House which our 
souls have for a long time panted after. And finding no 
other way at Present hy the all-working Providence of our 
only wise God and gracious Father to us opened for the 
Injoyment of the same. We do therefore after often and 
Solemn Seeking to the Lord for Help and direction in the 
fear of his holy Name, and with hands lifted up to him the 
most High God, Humbly and freely offer up ourselves this 
day a Living Sacrifice unto him who is our God in Covenant 
through Christ our Lord and only Saviour to walk together 
according to his revealed word in the Visible Gospel Relation 
both to Christ our only head, and to each other as fellow- 
members and Brethren and of the Same Household faith. 
And we do Humbly praye that through his Strength we will 
henceforth Endeavor to Perform all our Respective Duties 
towards God and each other and to practice all the ordinan- 
ces of Christ according to what is or shall be revealed to us 
in our Respective Places to exercise Practice and Submit to 
the Government of Christ in this his Church, viz. further 
Protesting against all Rending or Dividing Principles or 
Practices from any of the People of God as being most abom- 
inable and loathsome to our souls and utterly inconsistent 
with that Christian Charity wdiich declares men to be Christ's 
Disciples. Indeed further declaring in that as Union in 
Christ is the sole ground of our Communion, each with other. 
So we are ready to accept of. Receive to and hold Commu- 
nion with all such as by judgment of Charity we conceive to 
be fellow-members with us in our head Christ Jesus tlio dif- 
fering from us in Such Controversial Points as are not abso- 
lutely and essentially necessary to salvation. We also hope 
that though of ourselves we are altogether unworthy and 
unfit thus to offer up ourselves to God or to do him a, or to 
expect any favor with, or mercy from Him. He will gra- 
ciously accept of this our free will offering in and through 
the merit and mediation of our Dear Redeemer. And that 
he will im{)loy and emprove us in his service to his Praise, 
to whom be all Glory, Honor, now and forever. Amen. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 227 

The names of the persons that first joy n eel themselves in 
the Covenant aforesaid as a Church of Christ, 

John Myles, Elder, 

James Brown, 

Nicholas Tanner, 

Joseph Carpenter, 

John Butter worth, 

Eldad Kingsley, 

Benjamin Alby. 
The Catholic spirit of Mr. Myles, as expi'essed in this cove- 
nant and in his godly life, soon drew to the new settlement 
many families who held to Baptist opinions, as well as some 
of other church relations, friendly to their interests.* The 
opposition which their liberal principles had awakened had 
brought the little company into public notipe throughout the 
two colonies, and their character had won for them the re- 
spect and confidence of all their neighbors and authorities. 

The Rehoboth church had come to regard Mr. Myles and 
his followers with more kindly feelings, and, in 1666, after 
the death of Mr. Newman, in 1668, it was voted by the town 
that Mr. Myles be invited to "preach, viz.; once in a fort- 
night on the week day, and once on the Sabbath Day," in 
the orthodox church of the town. And in August of the 
same year the town voted ''that Mr. Myles sliall still continue 
to lecture on the week day, and further on the Sabbath, if he 
be thereunto legally called." 

This interchange of pulpit relations indicates a cordial 
sentiment between the two parishes, which is in striking 
contrast to tlie hostility manifested to the new church but 
three j^ears before, when they were warned out of the town, 
and suggests the probable fact, that animosities had been 
conquered by good will, and that sober judgment had taken 
the place of passionate bigotry. 

*"They tell me at Swanzey that Elder Miles permitted Mr. Brown's 
wife, who was not a Baptist, to commune with their church, till by Elder 
Olney's.intluence she was dismissed to Mr. Angier's church (Cong.) in 
Rehoboth." — \BaccJius History of Baptist's. 



228 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Previous to 1667, an acquaintanceship had sprung up 
between Rev. Mr. Myles, Capt. Willett, Mr. Brov^^n, and 
others of the settlers, which had ripened into close friendship, 
and the proposition was entertained between them of secur- 
ing for the Plymouth Court the grant for a new township 
south of the Rehoboth limits. To this end an application 
was made for a separate corporation under the name of New 
Swansea. The name was suggested by Mr. Myles, in re- 
membrance of his former home in Wales, and its original 
orthography indicates that the waters of the bay near the 
town were the favorite resort of this bird, and was called the 
Sea of Swans, or Swansea. This word has been corrupted to 
SWansey, Swanzey, Swansy and Swauzy. Their application 
was successful, as will be seen by the following: 

Grant of New Swansea. 

A true copy of the grant of this Township of New 
Swansea, lying on Record at the Court of New Plymouth, 
1667. 

Whereas, Liberty hath been formerly granted by the 
Court of the jurisdiction of New Plymouth, unto Captain 
Thomas Willett and his neighbors of Wannamoisett, to 
become a township there if they should see good, and that 
lately the said Capt. Willett and Mr. Myles and others their 
neighbors have requested of the C^ourt that they may be a 
township there or near thereabout, and likewise to have 
granted unto them such parcels of land as might be 
accomodate thereunto not disposed of to other townships; 
this Court have granted unto them all such lands that lieth 
between the salt water bay and covering Taunton River, viz.: 
all the land between the salt water and river, and the bounds 
of Taunton and Rehoboth not prejudicing any man's 
particular interest, and for as much as Rehoboth hath 
meadow land within the line of Wannamoisett, and 
Wannamoisett liath lands within the line of Rehoboth, lying 
near the south line of Rehoboth; if the two townships cannot 
agree about them amongst themselves, the Court reserves it 
within their power to determine any such controversy. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 229 

1667. The Court hath appomted Capt. Thomas Willett, 
Mr. Paine, Sen., Mr. Brown, Mr. John Allen, and John 
Butterworth, to have the trust of admittance of town 
inhabitants in said town, and to have the disposal of the land 
therein, and ordering the other affairs of said town. The 
Court do allow and approve that the township granted unto 
Capt. Thomas Willett, and others, his neighbors at 
Wannamoisett, and parts adjacent, shall henceforth be called 
and known by the name of Swansea. 

The organization of towns and the establishment of town 
governments is a democratic notion, and belongs by right of 
origin to New England. The town was the germ of the 
state. From Plymouth and Providence sprang the Common- 
wealths of Massachusetts and Rhode Island and Providence 
Plantations. The original settlers formed a pure democracy 
with inherent rights for determining the policy of the 
settlement, the character of its inhabitants, the officers who 
should govern them, and the spirit of the laws which should 
control them. As the population of the first settlement 
increased, the nature of the government remained the same, 
while it was changed from a pure to a representative 
republic, where a few, by the consent and choice of the many, 
administered all the duties and offices which related to the 
interests of the whole community. This was the leading 
characteristic of the New England policy. In this sense, 
towns were never known or established before, and the 
success of the state and the nation is primarily due to this 
system here introduced. 

As was noticed in the town grant, Capt. Willett and Mr. 
Myles were the founders and leading men in establishing 
New Swansea. The history of the church of which Rev. 
Mr. Myles was the pastor, is therefore inseparably associated 
with the civil history of the town, and the two elements are 
united in the legislation of the inhabitants. Indeed, it may 
seem to some from what has already been written, that the 
town was created for the sole purpose of affording a corporate 
and legal existence to the Baptist church, which had been 



230 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

founded at Wannamoisett, and of securing a more sure 
protection to its members. 

While this result was secured, we are assured that a 
broader platform than that of any church organization was 
proposed, and to Mr. Willett, who was probably a Pedobap- 
tist, we owe the settlement of the following principles, which 
have made the history of the old town so worthy of preser- 
vation, and the character of her population so worthy of 
commendation. On pages three and four of the town records, 
I find the following proposals, and the action of the church 
thereon: 

Capt. Willett's Proposals. 

"Whereas, Capt. Thomas Willett, shortly after the grant 
of this township, made three following proposals unto those 
who were with him, by the Court at Plymouth, empowered 
for the admission of inhabitants, and of granting lots, 

1. That no erroneous person be admitted into the town- 
ship as an inhabitant or sojourner. 

2. That no men of any evil behavior, as contentious 
persons, &c., be admitted. 

3. That none may be admitted that may become a charge 
to the place. 

The church here gathered and assembling did thereupon 
make the following address unto the said Capt. Willett and 
his associates, the Trustees aforesaid: 

"We being engaged with you (according to our capacity) 
in the carrying out of a township, according to the grant 
given us by the honored Court, and desiring to lay such a 
foundation thereof, as may effectually tend to God's glory, 
our future peace and comfort, and the real benefit of such as 
shall hereafter join with us herein, as also to prevent all 
future jealousies and causes of dissatisfaction or disturbance 
in so good a work, do in relation to the three proposals made 
by our much honored Capt. Willett, humbly present to your 
serious consideration (before we further proceed therein) 
that the said proposals may be consented to and subscribed 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 231 

by all and every town-man under the following explications : 
"That the first proposal relating to non-admission of 
erroneous persons may be only understood under the explica- 
tions following, viz.; of such as hold damnable heresies 
inconsistent with the faith of the gospel, as to deny the 
Trinity or any person therein ; the Deity, or sinless 
humanity of Christ, or the union of both natures in Him, or 
His full satisfaction to the divine justice by His active and 
passive obedience for all His elect, or His resurrection, ascen- 
sion to Heaven, intercession, or His second personable coming 
to judgment ; or the resurrection of the dead, or to maintain 
any merit of works, consubstantiation, transsubstantiation, 
giving divine adoration to any creature or any other anti- 
christian doctrine, thereby directly opposing the priestly, 
prophetical, or kingly office of Christ, or any part thereof ; 
or secondly such as hold such opinions as are inconsistent 
with the well-being of the place, as to deny the magistrate's 
power to punish evil-doers, as well as to encourage those that 
do well ; or to deny the first day of the week to be observed 
by divine institution as the Lord's or Christian Sabbath, or 
to deny the giving of honor to whom honor is due, or to offer 
those civil respects that are usually performed according to 
the laudable custom of our nation, each to the other as 
bowing the knee, or body, etc., or else to deny the office, 
use, or authority of the ministry, or the comfortable mainte- 
nance to be due to them from such as partake of their 
teaching, or to speak reproachfully of any of the churches of 
Christ in the country, or of any such other churches as are 
of the same common faith with us and them. 

"We desire also that it may be understood and declared 
that this is not understood of any holding any opinion 
different from others many disputable points yet in contro- 
versy among the godly learned, the belief of these not 
essentially necessary to salvation, such as pedo-baptism, anti- 
pedo-baptism, church discipline or the like ; but that the 
minister or ministers of the said town may take their liberty 
to baptize infants or grown persons as the Lord shall 



232 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 

persuade tlieir consciences, and so also the inhabitants to 
take the liberty to bring their children to baptism or 
forbear. 

''That the second proposal, relating to the non-reception of 
any of evil behavior, such as contentious persons, &c., may 
be only understood of those truly so called, and not of those 
who are different in judgment in the particulars last men- 
tioned, and may be therefore accounted contentious by some, 
though they are in all fundamentals of faith, orthodox in 
judgment, and excepting common infirmities blameless in 
conversation. 

"That the proposal relating to the non-admission of such 
as may become a charge to the town, be only understood so 
that it may not hinder any godly man from coming amongst 
us whilst there is accommodation that may satisfy him, if 
some responsible townsman will be bound to save the town 
harmless. 

"These humble tenders of our desires we hope you will 
without offence receive, excusing us therein, considering that 
God's glory, the future peace and well-being, not only of us 
and our posterity who shall settle here, but also of those 
several good and peaceably minded men whom you already 
know are liked, though with very inconsiderable outward 
accommodation to come among us are very much concerned 
herein. Our humble prayer both for ourselves and you, is 
that our God would be pleased to cause us to aim more 
and more at his glory, and less to our own earthly concern- 
ment, that so we may improve the favors that hath been 
handed to us by our honored nursing fathers to the advance- 
ment of the glory of God, the interest of our Lord Jesus 

Christ, and to the common benefit both of the Township and 
Colony, wherein he hath providentially disposed of us to 
serve our generation. 

"Your brethren to serve you in Christ. 
"Signed in behalf and in the name of the church meet- 
ing at Swansea, by 

John Myles, Pastor. 
John Butter worth." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 233 

The history of Mr. Myles has already been sketched, from 
his home in Swansea, Wales, where he occupied a prominent 
place among the Baptist clergy of that country, to his new 
home in Swanzey, New England, where he became a leader 
in the establishment, not only of Baptist principles in 
Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies, but also in the 
grander and broader notion of religious toleration. In these 
times, when a liberal Christian sentiment pervades our 
communities quite generally, it is difficult for us to appre- 
ciate the struggles and contests which the last two centuries 
have witnessed to secure it. The men who could plant 
churches in the wilderness in the presence of personal perse- 
cutions, with a firm reliance on the Divine arm for support, 
possessed the courage and sublime faith which makes heroes. 
Certainly the various trials which Mr. Myles and his asso- 
ciates endured show that they acted upon the instructions 
given to Joseph of old, "Be strong and of good courage." 

The covenant of the church, already given, indicates that 
Mr. Myles was a strong advocate of open communion, 
although while in Wales he was equally strenuous in advo- 
cating close or restricted communion. He also declared 
"that the ministry might take the liberty to baptize infants 
or grown persons as the Lord shall persuade their consciences, 
and so also the inhabitants to take their liberty to bring their 
children to baptize or forbear." True to his new convictions 
and desirous of uniting the elements around him in a har- 
monious and flourishing civil as well as religious community, 
he made his church the abode of all who sought a pure 
worship, untrammeled by sectarian tenets. On such a basis 
Mr. Brown and Capt. Willett could build a hearty fellow- 
ship, and engage with earnest zeal with Messrs. Butterworth, 
Tanner, Alby and Kingsley in the work of settlement of this 
plantation. ^ \ 

Mr. Myles' first residence in Swanzey was near the resi- 
dence of the late Mason Barney, Esq., at Barneysville. The 
bridge just east of his house, across the Sowams, or Palmer's 
river, was called Myles' Bridge. His neighbors on New 



234 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Meadow Neck were Deacon Butterworth, Nicholas Tanner, 
Benjamin Alby, Eldad Kingsley, and others. Myles Garrison 
used for defence in Phillip's War was in the same neighbor- 
hood. 

In these early days of Massachusett's history, even to times 
within an hundred years, the selection of the minister, the 
payment of his salary, and the question of his removal, were 
a part of the business of the towns at their annual meetings. 
While the larger number of the first families of Swanzey 
were Baptists, several were of the Congregational order. 
All, however, united most harmoniously, in the election of 
Mr. Myles as their pastor, for several years. His salary was 
small, and like Goldsmith's minister he 

"Was passing rich with forty pounds a year." 

His compensation was increased by the use of certain lands, 
denominated ''pastors and teachers lots," set apart in the 
first division of the town for the support and benefit of the 
ministry. His congregation was scattered over a wide ex- 
tent of territory, and although the majority of settlers had 
established themselves on New Meadow Neck, in the vicin- 
ity of the meeting-house and their pastor's residence, we find 
Mr. Willett's and Mr. Brown's families travelling from 
Wannamoisett, a distance of five or six miles, and Hugh Cole 
and his neighbors from Kickemuit, a distance of three miles, 
and other families still, a distance of four or five miles from 
Mattapoisett or Gardner's Neck, to attend Mr. Myles' preach- 
ing on the Lord's day. 

His interest in matters of education was second only to his 
desire to spread the Gospel. In 1673, the town voted to es- 
tablish a school "for the teaching of grammar, rhetoric, and 
arithmetic, and the tongues of Latin, Greek and Hebrew, 
also to read English and to write." Of this school Mr. Myles 
was invited to be school-master, at a salary of "forty pounds 
per annum in current country funds." He accepted and per- 
formed the duties of minister and school-master until the 
settlement was broken up by the Indian war. 

This school was kept in the several neighborhoods of the 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 235 

town in different portions of the year, so that the reverend 
schoolmaster not only enjoyed the privilege of boarding 
among his school parishioners, but also of carrying the means 
of a literary education from one community to another over 
the town. Then, as now, the clergy did not grow rich from 
the people. Some of the inhabitants saw no necessity of a 
schoolmaster, and others argued against paying his salary as 
a minister, and between both difficulties, Mr. Myles secured 
but a lean support. 

When Philip's war opened in 1675, Mr. Myles's house was 
fortified, and was known as Myles' Garrison. Here the 
troops collected at the first outbreak, and Mr. Myles was 
among the foremost in the defence of the infant settlement, 
holding the position of Captain. At the close of the war, 
the pastor found the membership of his church and society 
so scattered that he was obliged to seek a support elsewhere. 
Boston, Providence and Newport had become the only places 
of safety and sympathy for Baptist believers, and he preached 
in Boston for a considerable time after leaving his home in 
Swanzey.* At a town meeting of the town, May 27, 1678, 
"John Allen and John Brown were chosen to draw up a let- 
ter in the behalf of the church and town, to be sent to Mr. 
John Myles, pastor of the church, and minister of the town, 
manifesting their desire of his return to them; and Thomas 
Eastabrooks was chosen to carry the town's letter to Mr. 
Myles, at Boston." On his return he found the settlement 
nearly broken up near his old residence, and a large increase 

*Towards the close of this year (1677) Mr. Myles came again and 
ministered a while to his brethren in Boston. And Mr. Sprague, who 
in those times joined to the Baptist Church in Providence, in writing to 
the Massachusetts many years after says, "Why do you strive to per- 
suade the rising generation that you never persecuted nor hurt the bap- 
tists which is so apparently false? Did you not barbarously scourge Mr* 
Baker in Cambridge, the chief mate of a London ship? Where also you 
imprisoned Mr. Thomas Gould, John Russell and Benjamin Sweetser, 
and many others and fined them;^5o a man. And did you not nail up the 
Baptist Meeting-House doors, and fine Mr. John Myles, Mr. James 
Brown and Mr. Nicholas T3.nner?''—[Back2fs' History of the Baptists in 
New England, Page ^02, Edition of lyjy^ Boston. 



236 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

of inhabitants on the south end of the town, near Tyler's 
Point. Here in 1678 and '79, a meeting-house was built, 
and near it a house for the pastor. The house for Mr. Myles 
was built before the new meeting-house, as it was voted in 
1679, "that Mr. John Myles shall have the house built for 
him, to indemnify him for debts due him in the time of the 
Indian war, in full of his demands against them, and accept- 
ed by him." Mr. Myles continued his labors among this 
people for three years or a little more after his return, and 
died Februrary 3d, 1683, between sixty and seventy years 
of age and in the thirty-eighth year of his ministry. He was 
a man of good talents and education, with unusual energy of 
character. He was liberal in his religious opinions, but not 
loose; he was an apostle and not a proselyte. His sacrifices 
for conscience's sake testify to his firm adherence to truth, 
and his interest in civil society is evinced by the labors which 
he undertook for its prosperous advancement. His burial 
place is unknown, but it is supposed to be with man}^ of his 
people, near his home and place of preaching, at Tyler's 
Point, Swansea. Silence alone marks the resting-place of 
this pioneer and founder of (our ancient plantation) a larger 
religious freedom, through the First Baptist Church within 
the bounds of the present Commonwealth of Massachusetts.* 

*Cotton Mather mentions Rev. John Myles as among those who 
deserve to live in our Book for their piety, as having a respectful charac- 
ter in these churches of this wilderness. 

Hutchinson says, "I have seen a letter dated not many years after this 
time (1665) from Mr. Myles, a Baptist minister of Swansea, to one of the 
Congregational ministers of Boston, which breathes the true spirit of the 
Gospel and urges Christian concord, charity and love, althoagh they did 
not agree at every point. " 

Backus in his History of the Baptists in New England records the 
death of Mr. Myles as follows; ''The learned and pious Mr. Myles hav- 
ing returned to his flock in Swanzey, fell asleep in Jesus on February 3, 
1683, and his memory is still precious among us. We are told that being 
once brought before the magistrates, he requested a bible, and upon ob- 
taining it, he turned to these words: 've should say. Why persecute we 
him, seeing the root of the matter is found in me, Job 19.28,' which having 
read he sat down, and the word had a good effect on their minds, and 
moved them to treat him with moderation and kindness." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 237 

The name of his wife, Ann Humphrey, is all that is known 
of her. John, Susannah, and Samuel, were their children. 
John, Jr., probably lived and died in Swanzey. Samuel was 
at College at Cambridge in 1683; graduated in 1684; taught 
school in Charlestown 1684-5; went to England, received A. 
M. at Oxford; took Episcopal orders, settled as minister of 
King's Chapel, Boston, in 1689; and died in 1728. 

Of their descent, Daniel and three brothers served in the 
patriot army in the Revolution, and Daniel, with his great 
faith in the cause converted all his property into Continental 
money, losing all by its repudiation. Gen. Nelson A. Myles 
is a descendant. 

SWANZEY RANKS. 

All the lands of the town, which had not been distributed 
among the proprietors of Sowams and Mattapoisett prior to 
1667, were under the general control of the inhabitants and 
subject to its legislation, as we have already seen. 

We come now to consider a most extraordinary and novel 
method of dividing the lands of the town among its citizens, 
a plan which was practised in no other town in Plymouth 
colony, and so far as I can learn in no other colony in New 
England. The inhabitants were divided into three ranks or 
classes, according to their character and influence, corres- 
ponding in some sense to the three Roman orders, the Patri- 
cian, the Equestrian and the Plebeian. The power of rank- 
ing the inhabitants was exercised by the five persons ap- 
pointed by the Court to regulate the admission of the same, 
in 1666, and was afterwards assumed by committees appoint- 
ed by the town. Capt. Thomas Willett, Mr. Paine, Senior, 
Mr. Brown, Jolni Allen, and John Butterworth arranged the 
ranks at the first. Promotions and degredations were made 
from one rank to another according to the authority and 
judgment of the committee in charge. 

A portion of the legislation of the town with reference to 
this subject, was as follows: 

Swansea, February 9, 1670. 

It is ordered, that all lots and divisions of lands that are 



238 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

01' hereafter shall be granted to any particular person, shall 
be proportioned according to the three-fold ranks underwrit- 
ten, so that where those of the first rank shall have three 
acres, those of the second rank shall have two acres, and 
those of *the third rank shall have one, and that it shall be 
in the power of the selectmen for the time being, or commit- 
tee for admission of inhabitants, to admit of and place such 
as shall be received as inhabitants, into either of the said 
ranks as they shall judge fit, till the number of three score 
inhabitants shall be made up, and that when the said number 
of three score is accomplished, the lands that are already 
bought shall be divided and proportioned according to the 
said three-fold ranks; that in the meantime, the said select- 
men or committee shall have full power to grant lots unto 
such persons as may not be placed into any of the said ranks, 
until further order provides; the grants not to exceed nine 
acres to a man. 

The said first rank are only such as are in these columns: 
Capt. Thomas Willett Mr. Richard Sharpe 

Mr. Nathaniel Paine William Ingraham 

Mr. James Browne Mr. John Myles, Pastor 

Mr. John Allen, Sen. A Pastor's lot 

Mr. John Dickse A Teacher's lot 

The above second rank are only such as are in these col- 
umns: 

Samuel Luther William Howard 

Zach'r Eddy Thomas Lewis 

Robert Jones Gideon Allen 

Hugh Cole Jonathan Bosworth 

John Myles, Jr. Anthony Low 

Nicholas Tanner Obadiah Bo wen 

Benjamin Alby Thomas Eastabrooks 

Sampson Mason William Bartram 

Thomas Barnes George Aldrich 

John Cole William Salisbury 

Joseph Carpenter John Brown 

Gerard Ingraham A Schoolmaster 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 239 

* 

The said third rank are only such as are in these columns: 
Hez. Luther John Martin 

Joseph Lewis Isaac Allen 

Caleb Eddy Eldad Kingsley 

John Paddock Samuel Woodbury 

Nathaniel Lewis Joseph Wheaton 

Samuel Wheaton John Wheaton 

Thomas Manning John Harding 

William Cahoone Jeremiah Child 

In 1681, Mr. James Brown, Senior, Mr. John Allen, Sen. 
and John Butterworth were the committee for the admission 
of inhabitants. The}' granted to Capt. John Brown, Ensign 
Thomas Eastabrooks, Sergeant Samuel Luther, Sergeant 
Hugh Cole and Mr. Nicholas Farmer, their heirs and as- 
signs forever, "the full right and intent of the highest 
rank," &c. 

The establishment of ranks had already created a landed 
aristocracy; this act of the committee proceeded a step further 
and made the rank hereditary. The inhabitants of the town 
began to understand the tendency of their extraordinary 
rules on this subject. Although great dissatisfaction had 
been caused by the several assignments of ranks and the pro- 
motions and degredations from one rank to another, they 
had not been led to see the purely undemocratic tendency of 
their regulations, until the further singular action of the 
committee occasioned a unanimous protest on the part of the 
town, ahd a declaration that the act was utterly void and of 
no effect. From this time, the ranking system was wholly 
neglected, and this element of feudal tyranny enjoyed but a 
short life in our old town. 

Samuel Myles. 

As John M3des bore so excellent a part, by charity and 
patience, in settling the long and troublous debate relative 
to the rights of Baptists in a community where the ruling 
spirits were of the Congregational order, it was ordained 
that his son, Samuel Myles, inheriting the free and inde- 



240 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

pendent spirit of his father, should bear an equally impor- 
tant part in the bitter controversy which was coming on for 
many years against the Episcopal or established church, 
which made its first permanent home in America at King's 
Chapel, Boston. Born of Baptist parentage, reared in a 
community which represented the freest religious thought of 
his time, and educated in a Puritan college, it is no wonder 
that in his change of faith and service, and his entering 
upon Episcopal orders, that Cotton Mather in his "Vindica- 
tion of New England," should speak of him as ''a Parson (or 
a piece of one,) subscribing to Lyes." And in referring to 
his apostasy from the Baptist to the Episcopal faith says, 
'^This youth is an unfledged bird who thus defiles the nest 
in which he was hatcht." And. again the same yoluminous 
w:iter says, ''Twas therefore a brave and happy thought that 
first pitched upon this college; Tho at some time it has been 
unhappy in this, that it has bestowed its favors (its A. M.'s) 
on some ungrateful persons, who would now undermime that 
government upon which its foundations were laid and by 
which for so long a time, its superstructure has been always 
sustained." 

Samuel Myles, Class 1684. 

The only record which Harvard gives of the youth Sam- 
uel beyond that of his Latin name in his degree, Samuel 
Mylesius, Mr., is found in the curious diary of Tutor 
Noadiah Russell under date of March 23, 1682, wherein he 
sa^^s that Danforth, Myles and Watson were publickly ad- 
monished for speaking irreverently before the corporation 
"at a meeting when the abusing of freshmen was con- 
sidered." 

Mr. Samuel Myles graduated from Harvard in 1684, 5th, 
in rank in a class of nine, and within two weeks was called 
to the charge of the Harvard School, Harvard St., Charles- 
town, as the records state: 

"July 17, 1684, Mr. Samuel Miles did then enter on the 
keeping of the free school of this ,Town, and to have fifty 
pounds per annum, for his services." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 241 

Mr. Mather is more lenient to Schoolmaster than to Par- 
son Myles for he says, '''Tis but yesterday that his A. M. 
had recommended him to the school of a neighbor-town for 
which he was pretty well qualified (for he writt a good 
hand, and made good pens, and was able to construe a sen- 
tence in Corderius). We most readily own a good school- 
master to be one of the most honorable and valuable sights 
in a country and wish New England fuller of them. But if 
any of them after a while swaggering amongst boys, come 
out into the world, and will become domineering amongst 
men, and prescribing them scheams and representations of 
government, and take up and lash whole countreys, bring 
that lad's fingers to the Ferule and let the calling go free," 

The same author saj'S, 

"We must confess there was one who had the impudence 
to preach before he was baptized; His name was Samuel 
Myles A. M., but this was none of the country's fault, — 
'twas because of his descent." 

Mr. Myles taught the Charlestown school about three 
years and then went to England where he took orders in 
the Establishment. Returning to Boston he was inducted 
into the rectorship of King's Chapel, Jan. 29, 1689, as the 
successor of Ratcliffe and in 1692-6, during a second visit to 
England, he received a master's degree from the University 
of Oxford. Fi'om 1696, the worthy son of the Baptist par- 
son, continued to minister to the church at King's Chapel, 
till his death in 1728-9. Says Rev. Henry W. Foote, 

''Under the long ministry of Rev. Samuel Myles it (King's 
Chapel) won the respect if not the love of its neighbors. 
The plain building was the only place in New England 
where the forms of the court church could be witnessed. 
The prayers and anthems which sounded forth in the cathe- 
drals of the mother country were here no longer dumb. The 
equipages and uniforms which made gay the little court of 
Boston brightened its portals. Within, the escutcheons of 
Royal Governors hung against the pillars; at Christmas it 
,was wreathed with green; the music of the first organ heard 



242 MAGAZINE OF KEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

in New England here broke the stillness of the Sabbath air. 

The religious struggle of twenty-five years was over. If 
it be asked which party won in it, the answer must be, 
neither, and both. The religious despotism of Puritanism 
was broken forever. Baptists, Episcopalians, Quakers, 
might henceforth worship as the}^ would." # 

Of his character. Greenwood writes, ''he must have been 
a worthy and pious man and an accepted preacher." 

This was a stormy period both for church and state. The 

sons of men, who fought at Naseby and Marston Moor, 

were not put to flight by bulls, civil or ecclesiastical on this 

side of the water. The contest was necessary and its trials 

essential to the evolution of a purer faith. Had either party 

shown less of the persecuting or the martyr spirit — we 

should not to-day enjoy so great a heritage of liberty under 
the royal law. " 'Twas sharp medicine," as Raleigh said 
of the axe that beheaded him, but it was heroic in its puri- 
fication of the body politic of the ecclesiastical disease of 
intolerance. When John Myles landed at Weymouth in 
1663, Boston was the hot-bed of intolerant persecution. The 
thirty years following witnessed scenes as tragic and as 
heroic as have been embalmed in history. Men's bodies and 
souls were tried and not found wanting in physical and 
moral courage nor in a sublime faith. 

John Myles at Swansea, and Samuel at Boston stood for 
the larger and broader faith of our own day, and though 
they died without the sight, yet they lived long enough to 
see the whole spirit of the ancient time breaking in the 
presence of the "sweeter manners, purer laws" of tolera- 
tion. One step was taken in their day from persecution to 
toleration. Later, toleration gave way to liberty whose 
dawn is now the hope of mankind. 

We have good reason to hold John Myles in memory as 
the founder of the first free Baptist Church in The Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts; as the co-founder with Captain 
Thomas Willett of a town after the Baptist order, the first 
and the only one in the Commonwealth of the early finding 
and of the declaration on Massachusetts soil and the practical 
application of the principles of a true Christian Society, 'Tn 
essentials, unity — in non-essentials, liberty — in all things 
Charity." 



Extracts from Letter Book of Samuel Hubbard. 

CONTRIBUTED BY RAY GREENE HULING, NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 




{Continued from page 176.) 
betters. 
XXXI. 
UTH Burdick wrote a letter Jan'y 8, 1671-2, where in 
it appears that Mrs. Maxon of Westerl}^, was his 
daughter to whom he had written against those who 
had separated. (Backus). 

Note. It is hard to understand this allusion to Mrs. Max- 
on. The only person bearing that name in 1672 was Mary, 
the wife of John Maxon, of Westerly, who was the daughter 
of Hugh Mosier. Possibly Ruth Burdick called her sister 
Mosier, and Dr. Backus interpreted it not in the sense of a 
sister in the church, but of a sister by birth. 

XXXII. 

Mr. Hubbard wrote to his children at Westerly, Dec. IG, 
1671, and said, "This is to inform 3^ou upon yt sermon Rutli 
heard Obe Holmes preach. B. Hiscox spake publickly, 
admirably, of free grace by Jesus Christ, not by the works 
of the law, tlio' holy, just and good; no not baptism and the 
like, calling sinners to repentence for the breach of the law 
&c. Andtlien breaking of bread we all withdrew, they 
being troubled, warned in all of the ch'h(or relinquants) that 
stood off, as bro. Joseph Clarke, T. Clarke, J. Man, old 
Devil, S. Turnly, S. Rogers, Ed. Greenman, B. Hiscox, I, 
my wife, Rachel Andrew, B. Baster to come in 5 days: So 
it was aledged because some keeping the 7th day or sab'th, 
either they in an error or we, etc. Then bro. Hiscox began 



244 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

biittliey would not let him — eveiy one must answer for 
himself — lest others led by him; so they named me, but I 
would not be first; then my wife laid down three grounds, 
then br. Hiscox laid down his grounds, three also, then bro. 
Baster sd br. His. hath spoke my mind, so said Rachel, then 
br. Tory said, 'bro. Hubbard yo may lay down yr grounds if 
you will'. I answered, *I believe there is but one God, 
Greater of all things by His word at first, and then made the 
7th day and sanctified it and rested on it and was refreshed, 
never altering it com'd it to be kept holy, &c., that Christ 
our Lord stablished it, Mat. 5, the holy apostles stablished 
it, did not say it was holy, but is holy, just and good: and in 
the Revel'n the dragon made war with the woman's seed that 
kept the courts of God &c.' Bro. Tory said they required 
not my faith. I sd it was one ground for my practice (note 
br. John C. & br. Tory writ what all said, or some of it.) 
Br. Weeden said its his grounds, therefore should be written 
all, or else not well, &c. So I went on saying yt the back- 
slidings of some from wht they sd they had received of ye 
Lord, and one on his bended knees to God gave thanks for 
the discovery of it &c. Another say if ever God had dis- 
covered his grace to her soul, then he had made this also. 
They replied fircely: it was a tumult. J. Tory stoped them 
at last. Br. Hiscox, my wife and Rachel witnessed it. 
Another ground was Ob. Holmes saying we had left Christy 
gone to Moses &c. The ch'h left off appointing next 6 
day which was spent with br. J. Clark so we or some of us 
at last attended; and such was the good providence that 
tho' I and my wife were in town, yt br. Hiscox being there 
and no other that they began with him; so I and my wife 
came in and heard the discourse that day, next day again 
br. His. alone; so we seeing how things went to catch us, 
we drew up our result, appointed br. Hiscox to declare for 
us all in God's name and ours, an admonishment for preaching 
down God's holy 10 com'ts say all done away and upholding 
those apostates, and standing by Ob. Holmes preaching an 
untruth (or we) in God's name." 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 245 

Those who joined in this act were Mr. Hiscox, Hubbard 
and his wife and daughter Rachel with R. Raster. [See my 
history Vol. 1, p. 411.] (Backus). 

Note. The "B" before the names of Mr. Hiscox and Mr. 
Baster is the abbreviation for Brother. Joseph and Thomas 
Clarke here referred to were brothers of Dr. John Clarke. 
Thomas, the older, (b. 1605, d. 1674) like Dr. John and 
Carew died childless. Joseph (b. 1618, d. 1694) was the 
ancestor of all the Clarke's of this family. James Mann was 
one of the Baptists who, like Obadiah Holmes, removed to 
Newport for the sake of peace. "Old Devil" was another of 
the same company, William Davol, who came from Duxbury 
to Rehoboth in 1646 and bought the house of John Hazel. 
Between 1650 and 1653 he removed to Newport (to escape 
persecution) where he died in 16^0. "S. Turnley" I suppose 

to have been sister Turner, the wife of Lawrence, "S. Rogers 
may have been Mary Rogers, wife of James, or the wife of 
one of his sons. Ed Greenman was a wheelright who died at 
Newport in 1688. "Rachel" and "Andrew" were his daughter 
and her husband Andrew Langworthy. 

It would appear that the Sabbatarians were refraining 
from communion because Nicholas Wild and John Salmon, 
with their wives, were retained in fellowship by the Church. 
These had kept the seventh day for a time but had reverted 
to the customary practice. The members earlier named 
seem to have refrained from communion because Mr. Hub- 
bard and his fellow-believers were still members of the 
church. 

William Weeden was a deacon in the First Baptist 
Church, and'died in 1676. Joseph Torrey was an elder in 
this church and also Attorney General of the Colony. He 
was styled "Lieut." in 1676, which was the year of his death. 
He had a daughter married and resident at Westerly, but 
her name and that of her husband are unknown. 

XXXHL 

April 9, 1671, Mr. Stennett wrote to them from Walling. 



246 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

ford in the county of ''Barks," where said he "I now live", 
and says, "Things look here with a bad face, thick clouds 
and darkness is upon us in many places; the saints are much 
spoiled in their estates, for meeting together to worship the 
Lord, and we are in jeopardy every hour; pray earnestly yt 
we may hold out thro' this storm." 

XXXIV. 

The ch in Bell-lane wrote Mar. 24, 1672, and said, "We 
have been under some exercises more than ordinary from the 
hands of men; most of the brotherhood having been put in 
prison for some time; and tho' not now in hold, yet stand 
prisoners, and we know not what the issue will be." 

XXXV. 

Mr. Hubbard wrote to them, Oct. 6, 1672, and said, "Dear 
breth'n pray for us, a poor weak band in a wilderness beset 
round with opposites, from the com'n adversary, and from 
quakers, generals and prophane persons, and most of all 
from such as have been our familiar acquaintance; but our 
battles are only in words: praised be God." 

Note. "Generals" does not seem to refer to military 
opponents, but to General Baptists, probably to the members 
of the Second Baptist Church of which William Vaughn 
was pastor. 



Sanbornton N. H. — Seventy years ago the town of San- 
bornton N. H., was the third in the state in point of popula 
tion and general importance, though then as now, it was dis- 
tinctively a farming town. Portsmouth and . Gilmanton 
alone exceeded it, while Concord and Manchester together- 
hardly surpassed it in population. It was a large town terri- 
torially, as well as in other respects; and even today, al- 
though shorn of its proportions to some extent in the"fforma- 
tion of Franklin, and more extensively when Tilton was 
created, it remains of goodly size, and embraces some of the 
best of the hill farming land in New Hampshire. 



Extracts from the Friends Records, 
Portsmouth R. L 



BORDEN. 




^ F this name there are many items on the records kept 
^^ by the Friends of Rhode Island. Richard Borden 
born 1601, died May 25, 1671, was admitted aninhab! 
tant of the island of Aquidneck in 1638. By his 
wife, Joan, who died July 15, 1688, he had Thomas, Francis, 
Mary, Matthew, John, Joseph, Sarah, Samuel, Benjamin and 
Amey. It is the record of this family that is given below. 

Marriages. 

Thomas, Providence, to Mary Harris, Providence, Janu- 
ary 20, 1663. 

John, Portsmouth, to Mary Earll, of William, December 
25, 1670. 

Matthew, Portsmouth, to Sarah Claiton, Newport, March 
4, 1673. 

Amey, Portsmouth, to William Richardson, March 27, 
1678. 

Sarah, widow of John, Portsmouth, to John Earll, Free- 
town, December 24, 1719. 

William, Newport, of John, Portsmouth, to Alice Hull, 
of John, Jamestown, July 7, 1715. 

Abraham, of Matthew, Portsmouth, to Elizabeth Wanton, 
of Joseph, Tiverton, December 1,1713. 

Joseph, of Matthew, Portsmouth, to Elizabeth Bryer, of 
Joseph, Newport, April 8, 1718. 

Mary, of John and Elizabeth, Newport, to Philip Tilling- 
hast, of Philip and Martha, Providence, December 20, 1733. 



248 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 

Matthew, of Joseph and Elizabeth, deceased, to Hannah 
Clarke, of Samuel and Mary, Jamestown, December 21, 
1737. 

Sarah, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Newport, to Peleg Thurs- 
ton, of Thomas and Mehitable, Freetown, November 15 
1739. 

Mary, of Richard, Tiverton, to Christopher Gifford, Dart- 
mouth, June 6, 1721. 

Samuel, of Richard and Innocent, to Peace Mumford, of 
John and Peace, Newport, November 18, 1729. 

Rebecca, of Richard and Innocent, Tiverton, to Caleb Rus- 
sell, of Joseph and Mary, Dartmouth, April 25, 1734. 

Sarah, of -John and Elizabeth, Newport, to Thomas How- 
land, of John and Bathsheba, Tiverton, December 22, 1748. 

Elizabeth, of Abraham and Elizabeth, to Charles Whit- 
field, of Charles and Sarah, May 8, 1742. 

Thomas, of Joseph and Elizabeth, to Mary Wanton, of 
Philip and Hannah, Portsmouth, November 3, 1748. 

Matthew, of Abraham and Elizabeth, to Sarah Whipple, 
of Joseph and Sarah, Newport, October 19, 1749. 

Mary, of Abraham and Elizabeth, to Thomas Rodman, of 
Samuel and Mary, ''late of Newport," April 5, 1750. 

Richard, of John and Hannah, Tiverton, to Priscilla West- 
gate, of George and Elizabeth, Tiverton, September 12, 1754. 

Hannah, of John and Hannah, Tiverton, to Charles Wil- 
bour, of William and Elizabeth, Little Compton, November 
17, 1757. 

Matthew, of Abraham and Elizabeth, Newport, to Mary 
Borden, widow of Thomas, and daughter of Philip and Han- 
nah Wanton, Newport, November 5, 1761. 

John, of Richard and Innocent, Tiverton, to Ruth Peck- 
ham, of John and Mary, Little Compton, August 18, 1763. 

John, of Joseph and Catherine, to Sarah Shearman, of Job 
and Martha, Portsmouth, December 8, 1784. 

Ruth, of Richard and Priscilla, to George Harris, of David, 
and Martha, Smithfield, November 29, 1787. 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 



249 



Priscilla, widow of Richard, Tiverton, to Joseph Stead, of 
Edward and Phebe, Tiverton, March 27, 1793. 

Waite, of John and Eleanor, to Peter Lawton, of Isaac 
and Mary, Portsmouth, November 5, 1794. 



Matthew 


of Richard 


Births, 
and Joan, 


Poi 


'ts mouth 


, • May, 1638 


John 


n 




a 




(( 


Sept. 1640 


Joseph 


u 




a 




a 


Jan. 3, 1642-3 


Sarah 


u 




a 




a 


May, 1644 


Samue'. 


ii 




a 




a 


July, 1645 


Benjamin 


u 




«( 




a 


May, 1649 


Amie 


fcfc 




a 


Providence 


Feb. 1653 


Mary of 


Thomas 


and 


wife, 




ti 


Oct. 1664 


Dinah of 


Thomas 


anc 


Mary, 


Providence, 


Oct. 1665 


William 


a 




a 




a 


Jan. 10, 1667 


Joseph 


(6 




(t 




a 


Nov. 20, 1669 


Mercy 


(( 




(( 




a 


Nov. 3, 1672 


Experience 


(t 




a 




a 


June 8, 1675 


Meribah 


(( 




a 




a 


Dec. 19, 1676 


Ri chare. 


of John 


ant 


Mary, 


PO] 


■tsmouth 


, Oct. 24, 1671 


Amey 


it. 




a 




a 


May 30, 1677 


Joseph 


a 




a 




a 


Dec. 3, 1680 


Thomas 


t( 




a 




a 


Dec. 30, 1682 


Hope 


41 




a 




a 


March 3, 1685 


William 


n 




a 




i,i 


Aug. Id, 1689 


Mary of 


Matthew 


and 


Sarah, 




a 


Sept. 20, 1674 


Matthew 


11 




a 




a 


Aug. 14, 1676 


Joseph 


(( 




(( 




a 


July 17, 1678 


Sarah 


a 




a 




a 


Dec. 29, 1680 


Ann 


it 




a 




(k 


Jan. 5, 16823 


Thomas 


a 




a 




a 


April 9, 1685 


Richard 


a 




a 




(( 


Oct. 10, 1687 


Abraham 


a 




a 






March 29, 1690 


John 


a 




a 




a 


Aug. 20, 1693 


Benjamin 


a 




a 




a 


April 5, 1696 



250 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 



Mary of 


Joseph { 


md I 


Elizabeth, 


S^ewport, 


June 30, 


1710 


Matthew 




u 




(,i 


(,i 


Jan. 21, 


1711 


Joseph 




a 




li 


a 


Oct. 2, 


1713 


Joseph 




(( 




u 


a 


Sept. 28, 


1714 


Thomas 




a 




(,(, 


a 


May 30, 


1717 


Sarah 




4fc 




(( 


u 


Oct. 24, 


1718 


Ruth 




(,<, 




ii 


(I 


Nov. 6, 


1720 


Joseph 




4fc 




u 


a 


May 16, 


1724 


Benjamin 




(( 




(( 


a 


May 9, 


1726 


Elizabeth 




(,(, 




ti 


a 


July 27, 


1727 


Sarah 


of 


John 


and Elizabeth, 


a 


May 2, 


1719 


Ann 




(( 




(C 


ii 


Aug. 25, 


1720 


Joseph 


of Abraham 


and Elizabeth, 


Tiverton, April 2, 


1716 


Sarah 




(( 




!,(, 


i( 


Jan. 10, 1717-18 


Abraham 
Elizabeth 




(( 




ii 


(( 


Sept. 24, 


1719 


Benjamin 




(( 




(( 


(( 


July 17, 


1721 


Matthew 




(( 




t,i 


a 


April 2, 


1723 


Edward 




u 




ii 


a 


March 11, 


1725 


Edward 




a 




a 


a 


May 31, 


1727 


Mary 




it 




4( 


a 


March 10, 


1729 


John 




a 




(( 


ti 


April 16, 


1731 


Gideon 




a 




(4 


(( 


Sept. 16, 


1733 


Joseph 


of 


Samuel 


and 


Peace, 


n 


Oct. 14, 


1736 


Perry 




(( 




(( 


i(, 


Nov. 9, 


1739 


Anne 




a 




(( 


a 


March 18, 


1743 


Joseph of 


Matthew 


anc. 


Hannah, Newport, 


Feb. 8, 


1741 


William 




a 




i • 


(,i 


March 5, 


1746 


Hannah 




u 




(( 


u 


June 18, 


1749 


John 








Portsmouth Feb. 16, 


1752 


Waite ( 


31 


John 


and 


Eleanor, 


i<. 


June 8, 


1776 


Elizabeth 




a 




(i 


<,(, 


Nov 21, 


1778 


Ruth 




u 




u 


a 


Sept. 27, 


1781 


John 




a 




ii 


u 


Nov. 19, 


1783 


Isaac 


of 


John 


and 


Sarah, 


u. 


Sept. 9, 


1787 


Stephen 




i( 




(( 


a 


May 3, 


1789 


Eleanor 




ii 




u 


a 


Jan. 26, 


1791 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 251 



Asa 


of 


John an 


d Sarah, 


Portsmouth. 


Jan. 24, 1793 


Ann 




i(. 


fc( 


a 


Feb. IB, 1795 


VTary 




a 


u 


a 


Dec. 28, 1797 


Sarah 




u 


ii 


a 


Sept. 9, 1799 


Levi 




a 


(.i 


ki 


May 27, 1801 


Cyrus 




a 


u 


u 


Feb. 3, 1803 


William 




u 


ii 


a 


Nov. 27, 1805 



Deatt^s, 

Richard, "one of the first planters, buried in burying place 
Robert Dennis gave Friends," Portsmouth, May 25, 1671, 
age 70 years. 

Hope, of Joseph and Hope, Portsmouth, March 25, 1676. 

Thomas, of Richard, Portsmouth, Nov. 25, 1676. 

Joan, widow, Portsmoutli, July 15, 1688, age 81 years. 

Matthew, of Matthew, Portsmouth, June 22, 1700. 

Matthew, Sr , ''at Boston," May 5, 1708, age 70 years. 

Thomas, of Matthew and Sarah, "died at his mother-in- 
laws, Judah Pease," Newport, July 28, 1710, age 25 years. 

John, Portsmouth, June 4, 1716, age 76 years. 

Benjamin, at Barbadoes, of Matthew and Sarah, March 22, 
1718, age 22 years. 

Joseph, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Newport, December 11, 
1713, age 11 weeks. 

Joseph, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Newport, July 22, 1716, 
age 2 years. 

Joseph, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Newport, August 21, 
1725, age 1 year, 3 months, 6 days. 

Benjamin, of Joseph and Elizabeth, Newport, Oct. 7, 1727, 
age 1 year, 4 months. 

John, of Matthew, Portsmouth, at sea, August 16, 1727, 
age 35 years. 

Joseph, Newport, Oct. 1, 1729, age 51 years. 

Edward, of Abraham and Elizabeth, June 10, 1726, age 15 
months. 

Edward, of Abraham and Elizabeth, November 5, 1729, 
age 1 year, 6 months. 



252 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Ruth, of Joseph and Elizabeth, April 15, 1729, age 9 
years. 

Abraham, Newport, December 13, 1732, age 42 years, 9 
months. 

Richard, Tiverton, of John and Mary, Portsmouth, July 
12, 1732, age 61 years. 

Mary, widow of John, age 79 years, June 1734. 

Joseph, of Abraham and Elizabeth, at sea, Nov. 17, 1734, 
age 18 years. 

Sarah, widow of Matthew, Sr., April 19, 1735, age 81 
years. 

Joseph, of Richard, 1734, age 34 years. 

Elizabeth, widow of John, March 9, 1737. I 

John, of Abraham, deceased, Newport, August 28, 1747^ j 
age 16 years. ' j 

Thomas, at Jamaica, April 17, 1749, age 31 years. ^ 

Benjamin, of Abraham and Elizabeth, June 29, 1749, age 
7 months. 

Hannah, of Matthew and Hannah, April 29, 1765, age 15 
years, 10 months. 

Eleanor, wife of John, Portsmouth, March 4, 1783. 

Hannah, widow of Matthew, and daughter of Samuel and 
Mary Clarke, Jamestown, at Newport, March 11, 1783, age 
,69 years. 

Elizabeth, of Abraham and Elizabeth, wife of Charles 
Whitfield, January 16, 1796, age 70 years. 

Anna, of John and Sarah, Portsmouth, March 25, 1801, 
age 66 years. 

Cyrus, of John and Sarah, Portsmouth, Feb. 19, 1807. 

Levi, of John and Sarah, Portsmouth, Sept. 1, 1822^ 
age 21 years, 3 months, 4 days. 

John, Portsmouth, of Joseph and Catherine, April 30, 
1828, age 76 years. 

Elanor, of John and Sarah, and wife of Gardner Thomas, 
February 12, 1846, age 55 years. 



Notes. 



The Old Thompsonville Ferry.— The incorporation of 
the Thompsonville Bridge Company and the building of the 
bridge over the Connecticut river from Thompsonville to 
Suffield, is destined to put an end to an enterprise which is 
interesting for its age, as well as for its humble usefulness. 
The Thompsonville ferry is an institution over 200 years old, 
and deserves some mention and recalling of its quiet history 
before it drops into oblivion. 

No doubt the bridge will be very welcome as a great im- 
provement on the ferry. And yet it will be pleasant, if only 
as ministering to the satisfactory feeling that the world 
moves, for those rejoicing in the greater convenience, to re- 
call how they have perchance been caught out at night after 
ferry hours, and been forced to go around by Enfield bridge 
or have found the boat locked in ice and unable to take them 
and team to their desired home. The gray-haired grand- 
father, who was a happy lover in the days of the feriy, will 
gather his grandchildren around the hole in the floor which 
will do duty in lieu of a chimney corner, and recount how, 
in going home snugly tucked in his sleigh with the future 
grandmother by his side, having tripped it in Suffield's town 
hall till the wee sma' hours, he essayed to cross on the ice, 
the ferry being closed for the winter, was engulfed and 
fished out by kind neighbors, and given dry clothes and a 

bed until morning. These inconveniences become a pleasant 
memory when recalled in the presence of better times. 

— olim haec meminisse juvabit. 
In volume A of the Hampshire court records may be found 
the following paragraph: — 
1691; Upon some motion that there maybe a ferry started over ye 



254 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Great River at the house of John Allyn of Sufifield; this courte doth ap- 
prove & appointe Jno Allin of Suffield for ye affaire & he to require and 
be contente with 4d ye horse & 2d ye man. 

It must be remembered that until 1794 the towns of Suf- 
field and Enfield, now in Connecticut, belonged to the Mas- 
sachusetts Bay colony and to Hampshire county. The ferry 
named in the record was the first ferry at Sufiield and was a 
short distance north of the present one. For many years 
before and after 1749, when the place was finally decided to 
be in Connecticut, the ferry was kept by John Pengilly and 
Joseph Trumble, and was known as Gilly's ferry and Trum- 
ble's ferry. In 1754 the Assembly of Connecticut granted 
the privilege to the two men together. Two years later Mr. 
Trumble complained to that body that the town of Suffield 
had taken no care to provide either boats or a ferryman, and 
the privilege was granted him on condition that he keep and 
maintain in good repair sufficient boats for the purpose. He 
seems not to have fulfilled his task very well, for in 1758 
Thomas Marvin memorialized the assembly that the ferry, 
which was still known as Gilly's ferry, was in need of a good 
boat and wharf. He was willing to be at the expense of pro- 
viding these necessary things if he could have the monopoly 
of all ferry privileges north of what was known as the fall. 
One 3^ear later, however, the same man had found that his 
business was not paying very well, and he came back to the 
Assembly with the request that his fares might be increased. 
The fare was thereupon fixed at three pence for each horse 
and load, one penn}' farthing for each led horse, two pence 
for foot men, four pence for neat cattle, and a half-penny for 
each sheep, hog, or goat. 

As we should expect of so long a period of history, the fer- 
ry boat has been run by all methods of propulsion. Previous 
to the building of a dam a mile ar so below, it was possible 
to propel the boat by the current and this was the means 
used; but the dam destroyed the current. At one time it 
was run bj^a treadmill on the boat, and paddle wheels moved 
by horse power. James Saunders was the first to introduce 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 255 

steam, sometime before 1859. The boat was propelled in 
this way until about 1863 or '64, when it was found that 
steam did not pay satisfactorily, and it was discontinued. 
For two or three years from this time the owners reverted to 
a wire ferry, men walking from end to end of the boat and 
pulling it across. In 1867 the ferry had run down a good 
deal and did not pay expenses. Capt. A. S. Burbank was at 
one time at the point of throwing the ferry on the town. 
Finally it was bought by W. W. Pease, the present ferry boat 
being then partly finished, and the two towns on either side 
of the river gave $500 apiece to start the ferry anew. Mr. 
Pease was put under $2000 bonds to run a steam ferry for 
10 years. The present ferryman, S. A. Griswold, has been 
employed at the ferry as help for Mr. Pease, and later as pro- 
prietor, ever since March, 1868. The present ferry boat was 
put on in 1867. It has been repaired many times, and only 
a few planks of the original boat are left, and yet it preserves 
its identity like the famous metaphysical jacknife. Only a 
few casualties are remembered in connection with the ferry. 
Occasionally restive horses have been with difficulty kept 
from going into the water, and once or twice horses have 
been drowned. In 1827, when the boat was being turned 
over in the spring to be calked, Zenas Sikes was struck by 
the descending boat and so injured that he lived only three 
days. But on the whole the history of the ferry has been a 
happy one, and a pleasant landmark will be gone when it is 
replaced b}" more convenient and continuous means of cross- 
ing the river. — Springfield Mass., Republican. 

Rhode Island Coal M^ne. — The following extract is 
taken from ''The Boston Post-Bo}^ & Advertiser," Novem- 
ber 5, 1761. Does it refer to the coal mine at Portsmouth 
R. I.? If so, that mine was worked at an earlier period thaa 
is generally supposed. 

Samuel A. Gkeen. 

''We hear from Newport, on Rhode Island, That a very 
valuable Mineral, of the Coal Kind, is discovered withiii the 



256 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

Limits of that Town, in Land belonging to Captain Benja- 
min Almy. Upon repeated Trials, it is found to be a very 
good Fuel, emitting an intense Heat, and more durable than 
any of the Coal imported, and there is no doubt of its an- 
swering many valuable Purposes. The Inhabitants are well 
pleased with this Discovery, at a Time when the Scarcity 
of Cash, and Decline of Trade, seems to be a universal Com- 
plaint." 

An Interesting Memento. — The Bangor, Maine, His- 
torical Society is in receipt of an interesting memento, it 
being the Wyoming Memorial Medal, issued in accordance 
with a resolution of the Wyoming Centennial Association? 
passed at a meeting held October 11, 1877, and commemo- 
rates the "One Hundredth Anniversary of the Battle and 
Massacre of Wyoming, July 3, 1778— July 3, 1878." The 
medal is of beautiful design, in white metal by George Mor- 
gan, of the United States Mint, Philadelphia, and has on the 
obverse side a spirited view of the massacre, with the burn- 
ing of the log houses of the settlers, surrounded by the 
words: "In Commemoration of the Battle and Massacre of 
Wyoming, July 3, 1778;" and on the obverse a representation 
of the monument erected to the memory of the slain, sur- 
rounded by the legend: "Dulce et decorum est pro patria 
mori," and the figures 1778 — 1878. As the number of 
medals struck off was limited, the value of them will increase 
by age. 



-•-♦-^ 



FiTCHBURG Mass., originally a part of Lunenburg, was in- 
corporated in 1728. The original grant of the territory to 
the Proprietors, as they were called, was made by the Gen- 
eral Court in 1719, and it also included that which was after" 
wards incorporated as Townsend and a large part of Ashley* 
The original oi'thography of the name of Fitchburg has been 
a matter of some doubt and dispute. On the original act of 
incorporation it is spelled Fitchburgh, but it appears on ex- 
amination of the Town Records that the final letter was very 
soon dropped. 



Queries. 



44. Ayrault. — Information is desired regarding relatives 
of Doct. Nicholas Ayrault, a Hugenaut who was driven out 
from Rochelle, France, about the year 1690, and who died 
at Old Wethersfield, Conn., in the year 1707, at the age of 
37 years. 

It is supposed that one or more brothers came out about 
the same date, and that one settled at or near Newport, R. I. 

I should like to learn of them and of their ancestors in 
France if anything is known. 

Tonawanda^ N. Y, Miles Ayrault. 

45. Cornell. — Information wanted as to the descent 
and ancestry of Ezekiel Cornell who was Maj. General in 
the Revolutionary War, and later, member of Congress. 

Nice^ France. John Cornell. 

46. — Curtis. — Can an3^one tell me from whom Eunice Cur- 
tis or Curtiss was descended? Her parents and ancestral line? 
She was the wife of Thomas Wlieeler 2d of Woodbury, Conn. 
He was born in 1715, in Woodbury, married the above men- 
tioned Eunice Curtis about 1741 or 2, and lemoved to North 
East Dutchess Co., New York, in 1749, and died from the 
effects of exposure in the French and Indian War, in 1758. 
The date of his wife's death is not known by me. I shall be 
very glad of any information regarding Eunice Curtis or her 
line. There was also a Ruth Curtis who removed to North 
East Dutchess Co., New York, with the family of Thomas 
Wheeler, wlio died the same year of their removal, 1749. 

W William iSt., New London^ Conn. Annie E. Wheeler. 

47. Hill. — Can any one inform me of the parentage of 
Priscilla Hill, who was married to Lieut. Stephen Decatar, 



258 MAGAZINE OP HEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 

26 Sept. 1751, in Trinity church, Newport, R. I. Peterson, 
in his History of Rhode Ishind, page 102, says she was a 
widow whose maiden name was George, and his remarks im- 
ply that the family of George was a well-known one at that 
time in Newport. 

Providence^ R. I. Rev. Evelyn P. Bartow. 

48. Barton.— Da vid^ Barton b. 1746, d. 1819, Warren, 
R. I., married Rebekah Brightman of Freetown, Mass. He 
was descended from Rufus of Warwick; (Rufus,^ Benjamin,^ 
Andrew,^ Benjamin,*) was an officer in the Revolu- 
tionary War. I should like to know something of his ser- 
vices, and of the ancestry of his wife. Rufus Barton mar- 
ried Prudence Cole, daughter of Ebenezer and Prudence 
(Miller^ Cole, April 7,1771. They had Benjamin, Caleb, 
William, Caleb (2), Polly, Martha, Rufus, Nathan Sisson, 
Lillis Turner, Turner and Ebenezer Cole; the last named 
was born in Cambridge, N. Y., all the others iu Warren, R. 
I. I want to ascertain if this husband of Prudence Cole was 
that Rufus Barton who was born to Samuel and Lillis 
(^Turner} Barton, Aug. 20, 1749. There was a Rufus Bar- 
ton commissioned Lieutenant in a R. I., Reg., July 1780; who 
was he? Who were the ancestors of Ebenezer Cole who es- 
tablished the Cole House in Warren, R. I., in 1762? 

9^7 T St.^ Washington, Z>. C. Mary L. Barton. 

49. Graves. — Have all persons of this family given Gen. 
John C. Graves of Buffalo, N: Y. (this address will reach 
him) the histories of their immediate branches for the last four 
generations for publication. General Graves has been en- 
gaged for the past twenty years in compiling a history of all 
the great branches of his family from the first settlement of 
this country down to the fourth generation from the present, 
and will be ready to publish the history of the family in this 
country, on the invitation and under the auspices of The 
Buffalo Historical Society, as soon as he can complete the 
record of late generations. 

50. Pearce. — What was the maiden name of Experience, 



MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTORY. 259 

wife of Richard Pearce? He was son of Richard, born in 
Portsmouth, R. I., Oct. 3, 1643; removed to Bristol, R. I. 
where he died, July 19, 1720. 

P. 

51. Aldrioh. — Where can I find information relating to 
the following children of Nathaniel and Martha (JilUon) 
Aldrich, of Richmond, N. H. : 

Nahum, born Aug. 28, 1774. 

Levin, born May 24, 1777. 

Rhodia, born Sept. 1, 1779. 

Waite, born March 11, 1782. 

Nathan, born April 9, 1784. 
, Nathaniel, born August 6, 1786. 

Luke, born Oct. 25, 1788. 

Vena, born Sept. 25, 1790. 

Sarah, born Oct. 9, 1792. 
Whom did they marry, and what is the date of death of 
each. 

N. M. P. A. 

52. Brigham. — Of what family was Rev. Alanson Brig- 
ham, who in 1828 entered the Divinity School of Harvard 
College, and during the three following years held the office 
of proctor? In 1832 he went to Meadville, Penn,, and be- 
came a minister of the then infant Unitarian church in that 
town. He died there in 1833. 

T. 

53. Litter. — Elizabeth Litter was a daughter of Thomas 
Litter, of Plymouth, Mass., who came from London in 1635, 
at the age of twenty thi'ee, and died in 1684. He left one 
son and three daughters, the second of whom, Elizabeth, mar- 
ried Oct. 1655, William Shurtliff, who was struck by light- 
ning June 23, 1663. By him she had three sons. On Nov. 
18, 1669, she married Joseph Cook, the youngest son of 
Francis, who came to America in the Mayflower in 1620. 
He was born in Holland and came over in the Ann, in 1623, 
with his mother and brother. He died in 1676, and Jan. 1, 



260 MAGAZINE OF NEW ENGLAND HISTOEY. 

1689, she married Hugh Cole, who survived her. Hugh 
Cole was son of James and Mary Cole. Where can I find 
information, printed or otherwise, of the family of Litters, 
of which Elizabeth was a member? Facts relative to her 
brother and sisters desired. 

L. 

54. Clarke. — Where can a record of the births and 
deaths of the children of Rev. Ward Clarke, of Exeter, N. 
H., be found. He was graduated at Harvard College in 
1723, and for several years was a minister at Kingston, N. 
H., and died at Exeter, N. H., at the age of 34. His wife 
to whom he was married Nov. 20, 1727, was Mary, daughter 
of Charles and Sarah Frost, of Kittery, Me. Mr. George K. 
Clarke, in his work, ''The Descendants of Nathaniel Clarke 
of Newbury, Mass.," gives a good account of him, but has no 
record of his children, other than the following: 

I. John b. d. young. 

n. Tyler b. d. young, 

III. Infant b. d. July 27, 1735. 

St. John, JSr. B. J. P. J. 



flp^lSWE^S TO QUERIES. 



33. Delano — Jonathan Delano was